Posts Tagged ‘ Kansas ’

Kansas Bill Would Permit Spanking to the Point of Bruising

Thursday, February 20th, 2014

A Kansas lawmaker has proposed legislation that would make it legal for parents to spank children to the point that the strikes would be allowed to leave redness or bruising on the child.  (Update: On Feb. 20 the bill was killed before getting a hearing). More from The Associated Press:

Current Kansas law allows spanking that doesn’t leave marks. Rep. Gail Finney, a Democrat from Wichita, says he wants to allow up to 10 strikes of the hand and that could leave redness and bruising. The bill also would allow parents to give permission to others to spank their children.

It would continue to ban hitting a child with fists, in the head or body, or with a belt or switch.

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Discipline Without Spanking
Discipline Without Spanking
Discipline Without Spanking

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Sperm Donor Ordered to Pay Child Support

Friday, January 24th, 2014

A Kansas man who claims he acted as a sperm donor for a lesbian couple and waived all parental rights in the process has been told that because the artificial insemination was not performed by a licensed physician, the man is in fact the child’s father and is obligated to pay child support.  More from Time.com:

William Marotta claims to have waived his rights as a parent during the process, but Shawnee County District Judge Mary Mattivi maintained that the parties did not enlist a licensed physician, which nullifies his claim to being a sperm donor.

“In this case, quite simply, the parties failed to perform to statutory requirement of the Kansas Parentage Act in not enlisting a licensed physician at some point in the artificial insemination process,” Mattivi wrote in her decision, according to AP.

The case to have Marotta declared the father was filed by Kansas Department for Children and Families in October 2012. He could now effectively be held responsible for around $6,000 in assistance already provided by the state along with future child support payments.

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