Posts Tagged ‘ injuries ’

Injured Toddler Asked to Leave KFC, Told Injuries Upset Customers

Tuesday, June 17th, 2014

The KFC restaurant chain is apparently making amends after a 3-year-old girl and her family were asked to leave a Mississippi KFC because of the girl’s appearance as she recovers from a serious attack by three pit bulls.  Victoria Wilcher was attacked a few months ago, and she was at the restaurant with her grandmother following a doctor’s appointment that is part of her ongoing care.

After word of the incident went viral across social media outlets, the company apologized to the family, and pledged to donate $30,000 toward Victoria’s medical bills.

“The entire KFC family is behind Victoria,” company spokesman Rich Maynard told WTVR.  More from the station’s report:

“She was on a feeding tube at the time, but I figured she could just swallow (the potatoes). They just told us, they said, ‘We have to ask you to leave because her face is disrupting our customers.’ (Victoria) understood exactly what they said,” [said grandmother Kelly Mullins.]

Victoria cried all the way home, Mullins said.

“She’s got a lot of surgeries to go through and she won’t even look in the mirror anymore,” Mullins told WAPT. “When we go to a store, she doesn’t even want to get out (of the car). She’s three years old and she’s embarrassed about what she looks like. She’s embarrassed and I hate it because she shouldn’t be. It ain’t her fault.”

Victoria’s family recounted the incident in a Facebook page set up to raise money for her medical expenses.

“Does this face look scary to you?” the family posted on the Victoria’s Victories Facebook page. “I personally will never step foot in another KFC again and will be personally writing the CEO.”

The anger spread.

“As soon as we were notified of this report Friday, we immediately began an investigation, as this kind of hurtful and disrespectful action would not be tolerated by KFC,” the company said. “Regardless of the outcome of our investigation, we have apologized to Victoria’s family and are committed to assisting them.”

Add a Comment

Kids Face PTSD Risk When Parents Are Injured

Thursday, June 5th, 2014

Children whose parents are seriously injured face an elevated risk of developing post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) even if they themselves were not injured, according to new research conducted in Seattle.  The new study is reportedly the first to examine the effect of parents’ injuries on children in settings other than war zones.  More from Reuters:

Researchers studied 175 pairs of parents and school-age children seen at a Seattle trauma center. They found that uninjured children whose parents were seriously hurt were twice as likely to experience PTSD symptoms months later as those whose parents were uninjured.

“If the parent is injured, the child is more likely to have more anxiety in five months,” psychiatrist Dr. Douglas Zatzick told Reuters Health. “We hope to incorporate psychological support services that allow us to anticipate the difficulties that families face in the wake of injury.”

Motor vehicle crashes were the primary cause of injury when both the parent and child were seriously hurt. Other injuries were caused by burns or falls, for instance.

About 20 percent of uninjured children whose parents were injured reported symptoms of PTSD five months later, compared to 10 percent of uninjured children whose parents were also unhurt, according to findings published in Pediatrics. The difference shrunk after a year.

Zatzick and his colleagues at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle also found that injured children tended to recover more slowly physically and emotionally if their parents were also injured than children whose parents were not seriously hurt.

Image: Woman in hospital bed, via Shutterstock

Add a Comment

Shopping Carts Injure Dozens of Kids Daily, Study Finds

Thursday, January 23rd, 2014

Store shopping carts are the culprits in an average of 66 child injuries each day in the U.S., a new study by researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio.  The injuries amount to one every 22 minutes–and they are so severe that they warrant trips to the emergency room for 24,000 children each year.  More from NBC News:

The problem hasn’t gotten better since voluntary shopping cart safety standards took effect in 2004. In fact, since then, the annual number of concussions tied to shopping carts in children younger than 15 jumped nearly 90 percent, according to a new analysis of data from 1990 to 2011 by Dr. Gary Smith, director of Nationwide’s Center for Injury Research and Policy.

“This is a setup for a major injury,” Smith said. “The major group we are concerned about are children under 5.” His study is published in the January issue of the journal Clinical Pediatrics.

Kids ages newborn to 4 accounted for nearly 85 percent of the injuries. More than 70 percent of the harm was caused by falls out of shopping carts, followed by running into a cart or carts tipping over.

It only takes a moment for a parent to look away for a shopping cart accident to happen, Smith said. A wiggly baby in an infant seat or a toddler reaching for a bright box of cereal can easily cause a fall that results in serious injury. Children’s center of gravity is high, their heads are heavy and they don’t have enough arm strength to break a fall, Smith explained.

The researchers recommend parents choose carts with low-to-the-ground child seats (these often come in fun shapes like cars or fire engines), and remain vigilant if they have to use regular cart seats.

Click here for more guidelines to help keep your child safe around the house.

Baby Care Basics: Baby Accidents
Baby Care Basics: Baby Accidents
Baby Care Basics: Baby Accidents

Image: Child in a shopping cart, via Shutterstock

Add a Comment

Falling TVs Increasingly Injure Kids

Wednesday, July 24th, 2013

Falling television sets–usually older models that are moved to other rooms when the family upgrades its main TV–are injuring a growing number of kids when the TVs fall.  Every 45 minutes, according to a new, longitudinal study conducted by the Child Injury Prevention Alliance, a child arrives at the emergency room with a TV related injury.  More from Reuters:

More than half of the injuries were caused by falling TVs, another 38 percent were caused by children running into the units and about 9 percent were caused by other situations, including televisions being moved from one location to another.

The majority of the injuries were to boys and about 64 percent of the injuries were to children less than five years old. Two-year olds were the age group most likely to be hurt. There were six deaths.

The head and neck area was the most common site of injury, and cuts, bruises and concussions the most common types of injury.

The overall rate of TV-related injuries held steady at about 17,000 per year over the 22-year period.

The percentage of injuries related to “striking” TVs fell dramatically over time, however, while the rate of injuries caused by falling TVs doubled from about 1 per 10,000 children in 1990 to about 2 per 10,000 children in 2011.

Image: Television and family, via Shutterstock

Add a Comment

Amusement Rides Hurt More than 4,000 Kids a Year

Thursday, May 2nd, 2013

Amusement park rides including roller coasters injure some 4,400 kids each year, some badly enough to require hospitalization, according to a large study conducted by the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System.  More from NBC News:

Most of the injuries are not serious — just bumps and bruises, but about 67 kids a year, or 1.5 percent, are injured badly enough to be hospitalized, according to an analysis of data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System, which includes reports from about 100 nationally representative hospitals. It’s the most in-depth study to date, tracking 20 years of injuries which occurred at fixed-site amusement parks, mobile carnivals and fairs and coin-operated rides at places like malls, stores and restaurants.

About 20 kids a day are hurt on rides in the peak season between May and September. “That’s one every two hours,” said Dr. Gary A. Smith, who conducted the research for Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio.

Such harm — and the most in-depth study to date on ride injuries — highlights the need for more awareness, better education, and increased tracking and oversight, he said.

“In the past, the discussion has always been on roller-coaster injuries and the bigger rides,” Smith said. “The message here is that these injuries occur across a broad spectrum of types of rides and across many locations.”

Image: Roller coaster, via Shutterstock

Add a Comment