Posts Tagged ‘ infant sleep ’

Nearly 1 in 8 SIDS Deaths Happen on a Couch: Study

Monday, October 13th, 2014

SIDS Risk For Babies on Sofa Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is more likely to take place on a sofa, than researchers and doctors had ever thought before, according to a study published Monday in Pediatrics.

While doctors have discouraged parents from letting their child sleep anywhere but on the firm surface of a crib or bassinet, researchers have found, using new data from the National Center for the Review and Prevention of Child Deaths Case Reporting System, that sofa deaths account for nearly one in every eight SIDS and sleep-related infant deaths.

“Sofas don’t even come to mind when people think of places where infants sleep,” Dr. Jeffrey Colvin, study co-author and pediatrician at Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Mo., told HealthDay.  ”The proportion was much, much higher than I ever could have guessed.”

Sofas have soft cushions that can lead to SIDS and suffocation or strangulation. And the study found that those reported deaths were linked to surface sharing, sleeping on their side, changing sleep location and experiencing prenatal tobacco exposure. In fact, the study stated that “parents were more likely to lay their infants face down on a sofa than, for instance, face down in a crib,” The New York Times reported.

Researchers even stressed that babies can experiences SIDS when a parent is watching them. There’s a “fallacy that if I’m awake or watching, SIDS won’t happen,” Dr.  Colvin said in the Times.

Bed-sharing, placing your infant on his stomach and having too many blankets and pillows around him are all danger zones when it comes to SIDS. The best rule of thumb when putting Baby to bed is to practice the ABCs: Alone, on their Back, in a Crib.

New baby in the house? Read up on these other prevention methods to protect your baby from SIDS.

Baby Care Basics: What is SIDS?
Baby Care Basics: What is SIDS?
Baby Care Basics: What is SIDS?

Photo of baby sleeping courtesy of Shutterstock.

Add a Comment

Sleep-Related Death and Babies: Risk Factors Vary by Age, Study Finds

Monday, July 14th, 2014

Baby Sleeping on BackHow safe is your baby’s sleep?

A new study examined the biggest sleep risks for babies under 1 year of age and found that younger and older infants faced different risk factors for sleep-related deaths. In the study, which was published online today in the journal Pediatrics, researchers analyzed more than 8,000 sleep-related infant deaths from 24 states between 2004 and 2012. Of those deaths, the study found that for infants up to 4 months of age, the biggest risk factor for sleep-related death was bed-sharing with either a parent or pet. In fact, in roughly 74 percent of the cases studied, the infants had been bed-sharing at the time of their death. About 50 percent of those cases happened when the child was sleeping in an adult bed or on a person.

But for infants ages 4 months to 1 year, the largest risk factor associated with death was different: rolling into objects, including blankets, stuffed animals, pillows, and bumpers, during sleep. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that babies sleep in the same room as their care providers, but not in the same bed. The crib or bassinet should be within arm’s reach, free of any loose items, including toys and soft bedding, and covered with a fitted sheet.

Despite those safe-sleep recommendations, a whopping 73 percents of the 4,500 respondents in a recent American Baby magazine survey admitted they placed at least one item the crib with their baby.

Baby Care Basics: What is SIDS?
Baby Care Basics: What is SIDS?
Baby Care Basics: What is SIDS?

Babyproofing Your Home: Crib
Babyproofing Your Home: Crib
Babyproofing Your Home: Crib

Image: close-up portrait of a sleeping baby via Shutterstock

Add a Comment

Some Infant White Noise Machines Could Pose Hearing Risk

Tuesday, March 4th, 2014

Some infant sleep machines, which produce sounds that are intended to soothe babies to sleep, may, if set at their highest volumes, damage babies’ hearing, according to new research published in the journal Pediatrics.  More from The New York Times:

Infant sleep machines emit white noise or nature sounds to drown out everyday disturbances to a baby’s sleep. The machines, sometimes embedded in cuddly stuffed animals, are popular gifts at baby showers and routinely recommended by parenting books and websites.

Some sleep experts advise parents to use these noisemakers all night, every night, to ensure the best rest for a newborn. Many parents say their babies become so used to the sounds of rainfall or birds that they will not nap without them.

Researchers at the University of Toronto evaluated 14 popular sleep machines at maximum volume and found they produced between 68.8 to 92.9 decibels at 30 centimeters, about the distance one might be placed from an infant’s head. Three exceeded 85 decibels, the workplace safety limit for adults on an eight-hour shift for accumulated exposure as determined by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. One machine was so loud that two hours of use would exceed workplace noise limits.

At 100 centimeters, all the machines tested were louder than the 50-decibel limit averaged over an hour set for hospital nurseries in 1999 by an expert panel concerned with improving newborn sleep and their speech intelligibility.

“These machines are capable of delivering noise that we think is unsafe for full-grown adults in mines,” said Dr. Blake Papsin, the senior author of the paper and the chief otolaryngologist at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. The study was published in the journal Pediatrics. Dr. Papsin got the idea for this study after a parent brought a portable white noise machine to the hospital that sounded as roaring as a carwash.

“Unless parents are adequately warned of the danger, or the design of the machines by manufacturers is changed to be safer, then the potential for harm exists, and parents need to know about it,” said Dr. Gordon B. Hughes, the program director of clinical trials for the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, who was not involved in the study.

Safe use is possible, the study’s authors suggest. “Farther away is less dangerous, a lower volume is better and shorter durations of time, all things that deliver less sound pressure to the baby,” Dr. Papsin said.

Image: Sleeping newborn, via Shutterstock

Find out when your child will hit all her major milestones with our Baby Milestone Tracker.

Baby Sleep: The Importance of Self-Soothing
Baby Sleep: The Importance of Self-Soothing
Baby Sleep: The Importance of Self-Soothing

Add a Comment

Bassinets and Cradles Get New Federal Safety Standards

Friday, October 4th, 2013

The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has approved new safety standards for cradles and bassinets, designed to prevent deaths and injuries that can happen in poorly constructed versions.  More than 130 children died between 2007 and 2013 because of faulty bassinets and cradles, and the CPSC is aware of 426 incidents involving them.  The new guidelines include:

  1. a clarification of the scope of the bassinet/cradle standard;
  2. a change to the pass/fail criterion for the mattress flatness test;
  3. an exemption from the mattress flatness requirement for bassinets that are less than 15 inches across;
  4. the addition of a removable bassinet bed stability requirement; and
  5. a change to the stability test procedure, requiring the use of a newborn CAMI dummy rather than an infant CAMI dummy.

The new standards, which define “bassinet or cradle” as a small bed designed primarily to provide sleeping accommodations for infants, supported by free standing legs, a stationary frame or stand, a wheeled base, a rocking base, or swing relative to a stationary base. In a stationary (non-rocking or swinging) position, a bassinet/cradle is intended to have a sleep surface less than or equal to 10 degrees from horizontal.  Bassinets and cradles are not meant to be used past the age of 5 months.

A major impetus behind the new guidelines is the prevention of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).  Check your own sleep safety habits by reading this article by Parents.com’s health director:  The Safe-Sleep Rules Parents Break

Image: Bassinet, via Shutterstock

Add a Comment

Bed-Sharing on the Rise Despite Warnings

Wednesday, October 2nd, 2013

A growing number of families are bed-sharing, or having their infants and young children sleep in bed with their parents, despite warnings from health experts that the practice increases the chances that a baby could die of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), suffocation, or entanglement.  A new government-funded study shows that bed-sharing has doubled over the past 17 years. More from USA Today:

The increase was most notable among African-American infants, according to the study reported Monday in the journal JAMA Pediatrics.

Overall, the percentage of nighttime caregivers who reported that an infant usually shared a bed rose from 7% in 1993 to 14% in 2010. Among black infants the proportion increased from 21% to 39%. Among white infants, it rose from 5% to 9%. Among Hispanic infants, it rose from 13% to 21%.

“The disparity in nighttime habits has increased in recent years,” said lead author Eve Colson of the Yale University School of Medicine in a statement. “Because African-American infants are already at increased risk for SIDS, this trend is a cause for concern.”

Advice from physicians could significantly reduce infant bed-sharing, also known as co-sleeping, for all families, finds the survey of nearly 20,000 caregivers conducted by researchers with the National Institutes of Health and others. Caregivers who perceived physicians’ attitude as against sharing a bed were about 34% less likely to report that the infant usually shared a bed than were caregivers who received no advice.

To reduce the risk of SIDS and other sleep-related dangers, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends placing babies to sleep in the same room as the caregiver, but not in the same bed.

Image: Bed-sharing family, via Shutterstock

Add a Comment