Posts Tagged ‘ home births ’

Growing Number of Home Births Result in Deaths

Thursday, February 6th, 2014

Giving birth at a hospital–even under the care of a midwife–is less likely to result in infant death than giving birth at home, according to new research conducted using data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  The take-away from the study is not that women should avoid holistic care options like midwives and doulas, but that they should think twice about giving birth at home.  More from Time.com:

A new study from researchers at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center presented at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting, in New Orleans, found a growing rate of newborn deaths associated with home births.

That’s disturbing because the practice is becoming more popular in the U.S. In 2012, the CDC reported that after declining from 1990 to 2004, the rate of home births has increased by almost 30% from 2004 to 2009 (the latest years for which numbers are available).

Using CDC data collected from 14 million infant births and deaths, the research team learned that the rate of newborn deaths was greater for home births delivered by midwives (12.6/10,000 births) compared to births delivered by midwives in a hospital (3.2/10,000 births). The death rates were even greater for first-time mothers having a midwife delivery at home (21.9/10,000 births). Births in a hospital–even if delivered by a midwife, were still safer than home deliveries.

Taken together, there were about 18 to 19 additional newborn deaths from midwife home deliveries compared to midwife hospital deliveries. If home births by midwives continue to increase at the current rate, the researchers suspect that newborn mortality could almost double from 2009 to 2016.

Based on these findings, the scientists say that expectant parents should be aware of the risks of home births, and doctors should strongly encourage women who want to use midwives to deliver at a hospital. Many families choose home births because they believe that having their baby at home is more comfortable for both mom and baby; to accommodate them, hospitals could make their birthing experiences more welcoming and relaxing for mothers.

Image: Woman laboring at a hospital, via Shutterstock

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Report: Home Births Continue to Rise in U.S.

Monday, January 30th, 2012

A new report from the National Center for Health Statistics has found that more mothers are choosing to deliver their babies at home, CNN.com reports:

Between 1990 and 2004, the number of women who were choosing to give birth at home steadily declined. But in 2005 the trend turned, according to a new report released by the National Center for Health Statistics on Thursday.

The number of home births in the U.S. jumped by 29% from 2004 to 2009. Although home births are still rare – they account for less than 1% of all births – this is a pretty rapid increase, said Marian MacDorman, statistician at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“Forty, 50 years ago, there was this idea that hospital birth was more modern. Now it’s the opposite.”

The biggest increase was in non-Hispanic white women. About 1 in 90 births in that segment of the population is now a home birth, according to the report. Home births are most common among women over the age of 35 who have already had at least one child.

The data doesn’t tell us why home births have increased, MacDorman said, but she can take a few educated guesses. Cost may be an issue; on average, home births cost about one third less than hospital births. Another reason may be dissatisfaction with the care women in labor receive at a hospital. Doctors and nurses are busy, often caring for more than one patient at a time whereas at home, a woman can have a midwife attending only to her.

In July, a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published similar findings, citing further statistics that found 12 percent of home births required medical transfer to a hospital.

Image: Pregnant woman in bed, via Shutterstock.

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