Posts Tagged ‘ home birth ’

Non-Hospital Births Reach 37-Year High

Thursday, March 6th, 2014

The number of babies being born outside of hospitals–either at birthing centers or at home–is on the rise, according to new numbers released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  More from Yahoo News:

In 2012, 1.36 percent of all U.S. births occurred outside of hospitals — either at home, or at a birthing center — up from 1.26 percent in 2011, according to the report.

Home and birthing center births have been on the rise since 2004, and the 2012 level is the highest since 1975, the report said.

Out-of-hospital births were more common among white women compared with other races: About 1 in 50 births to white women, or 2 percent, were outside of a hospital, compared to 0.54 percent of births to Asian or Pacific Islander women, 0.49 percent of births to black women and 0.46 percent of births to Hispanic women.

Northwestern states tended to have the highest percentage of home and birthing center births. More than 3 percent of births took place outside of a hospital in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana and Alaska, and also in Pennsylvania.

Out-of-hospital births had lower rates of some complications, compared with births that took place in hospitals: The percentage of babies born preterm or at a low birth weight was lower among out-of-hospital births compared to hospital births, according to the report, from the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics.

This finding suggests that women who have a low risk of pregnancy complications (such as preterm birth) are making up a relatively larger proportion of out-of-hospital births than hospital births, the researchers said. In other words, women at higher risk for these complications are appropriately giving birth in hospitals instead of in other settings.

The report comes at a time when home vs. hospital birthing is a highly controversial topic.  Recent data, also released by the CDC, found a growing number of infant deaths among babies who are birthed at home.

Need help creating your own birth plan? Download our free planning guide to get started!

Your Baby Is Almost Here: Week 35 of Pregnancy to Birth
Your Baby Is Almost Here: Week 35 of Pregnancy to Birth
Your Baby Is Almost Here: Week 35 of Pregnancy to Birth

Image: Pregnant woman being examined, via Shutterstock

Add a Comment

Growing Number of Home Births Result in Deaths

Thursday, February 6th, 2014

Giving birth at a hospital–even under the care of a midwife–is less likely to result in infant death than giving birth at home, according to new research conducted using data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  The take-away from the study is not that women should avoid holistic care options like midwives and doulas, but that they should think twice about giving birth at home.  More from Time.com:

A new study from researchers at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center presented at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting, in New Orleans, found a growing rate of newborn deaths associated with home births.

That’s disturbing because the practice is becoming more popular in the U.S. In 2012, the CDC reported that after declining from 1990 to 2004, the rate of home births has increased by almost 30% from 2004 to 2009 (the latest years for which numbers are available).

Using CDC data collected from 14 million infant births and deaths, the research team learned that the rate of newborn deaths was greater for home births delivered by midwives (12.6/10,000 births) compared to births delivered by midwives in a hospital (3.2/10,000 births). The death rates were even greater for first-time mothers having a midwife delivery at home (21.9/10,000 births). Births in a hospital–even if delivered by a midwife, were still safer than home deliveries.

Taken together, there were about 18 to 19 additional newborn deaths from midwife home deliveries compared to midwife hospital deliveries. If home births by midwives continue to increase at the current rate, the researchers suspect that newborn mortality could almost double from 2009 to 2016.

Based on these findings, the scientists say that expectant parents should be aware of the risks of home births, and doctors should strongly encourage women who want to use midwives to deliver at a hospital. Many families choose home births because they believe that having their baby at home is more comfortable for both mom and baby; to accommodate them, hospitals could make their birthing experiences more welcoming and relaxing for mothers.

Image: Woman laboring at a hospital, via Shutterstock

Add a Comment

James, Kimberly Van Der Beek Welcome Baby Girl

Monday, January 27th, 2014

James Van Der Beek and his wife Kimberly have welcomed their third child, a girl. PEOPLE.com reports on the couple’s announcement:

Actor James Van Der Beek and wife Kimberly welcomed their third child, a daughter, on Saturday night following a natural home birth, his rep confirms to PEOPLE exclusively.

Baby girl weighed 7 lbs., 8 oz. No other details, including a name, have been released.

“Kimberly and little one are doing really well,” his rep tells PEOPLE exclusively.

“Outnumbered by kids, outnumbered by girls, outlandishly grateful and thrilled. Watch out world, VDB baby #3 made her debut last night,” the Friends with Better Lives star, 36, Tweeted on Sunday.

Already dad to son Joshua, 22 months, and daughter Olivia, 3.

What’s the perfect baby name for your baby? Use our Create-A-Baby-Name Quiz to help get you on the right track.

Baby Names: How to Know You've Picked the Right Name
Baby Names: How to Know You've Picked the Right Name
Baby Names: How to Know You've Picked the Right Name

Image: James and Kimberly Van Der Beek, via Helga Esteb / Shutterstock.com

Add a Comment

Jared Padalecki, Wife Welcome Second Son

Friday, December 27th, 2013

The actor Jared Padalecki, who stars in the TV drama “Supernatural,” is father to a baby boy, his second with wife–and former co-star–Genevieve Cortese Padalecki.  PEOPLE.com has more:

“My amazingly strong wife home-birthed a happy and healthy baby boy last night. Please send love,” Padalecki, 31, writes.

The new addition joins big brother Thomas Colton, 21 months. The couple had announced the pregnancy in July.

Image: Jared Padalecki, via carrie-nelson / Shutterstock.com

Add a Comment

Home Births Carry 10 Times the Risk of Stillborn Babies

Thursday, September 19th, 2013

A new study published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology has found that women who give birth at home are 10 times more likely to have stillbirths; first-born children who are delivered at home are 14 times more likely to be stillborn.  More from ABC News:

In the largest study of its kind, investigators at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York City reviewed data from a sampling of 13 million of the nearly 17 million singleton full-term births in the United States between 2004-2007. These included births to parents of all races, ethnic groups and income levels.

Among their findings: Babies born at home were nearly 10 times more likely to be stillborn, and the risk of stillbirth increased to 14 times for firstborns. Babies born at home were also almost four times more likely to experience neonatal seizures or serious neurologic dysfunction compared with babies born in hospitals.

The study’s results were confirmed by analyzing birth certificate files from the National Center for Health Statistics to evaluate deliveries by physicians and midwives in the hospital and at home from 2007 to 2010. The researchers looked at Apgars, scores that assess the health of an infant one minute and five minutes after birth. A five-minute Apgar score of zero is considered a stillbirth. About 10 percent of these babies survive, though often with major health problems.

“Childbirth is one of the most wonderful moments in humanity, and people deserve the best of all circumstances, including enhancing the experience and reducing unnecessary interventions,” said Dr. Amos Grunebaum, chief of labor and delivery at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, and the study’s lead author. “Having said that, it’s not only about experience. It’s also about making sure the baby is born safely.”

Grunebaum said that the study associated risk with the location of a planned birth, rather than the credentials of the person delivering the baby. When a child is born at home, typically there is only the midwife or doctor to address any unpredictable circumstances that arise, but in the hospital, a team of specialists can be mobilized in seconds if needed, he said.

Add a Comment