Posts Tagged ‘ high school sports ’

Mom Suspect in Racism Incident that Cancelled Football Season

Thursday, December 5th, 2013

The mother of a former high school football player in Lunenberg, Massachusetts is a suspect in an incident in which racist slurs were scrawled on her home.  The episode prompted school officials to cancel the rest of the football season when it was believed that fellow players may have committed what was called a “hate crime.”  Fox Sports has more on the new developments:

According to the Boston Globe, Lunenburg (Mass.) police and the FBI questioned Andrea Brazier on Nov. 25 about the offensive messages spray painted on her home. 13-year-old Isaac Phillips, Brazier’s son, is half-black and was believed to be the target of the graffiti, which was discovered on Nov. 15 and included the phrase “Knights don’t need n——!”

Brazier previously told police that Phillips had been harassed by teammates on the Lunenburg High School football team, and the initial thought was that the writing was the handiwork of those players. But the players were later cleared, and police then began to pursue other suspects.

The court records obtained by the Boston Globe included an affidavit that detailed Brazier’s conversation with investigators on Nov. 25. During the interview, Brazier reportedly stated that neither her husband, Anthony J. Phillips, nor her son were responsible for the graffiti. However, Brazier also reportedly pushed for the investigation into the matter to end.

“Andrea stated ‘OK,’” the affidavit said, according to the Globe. “Andrea just kept answering ‘OK’ and that she wanted everything to end and that we did not understand.”

After the meeting with Brazier, police received a warrant to search Brazier’s home, which they executed Tuesday.

During the search, the Globe reports, police found a can of Krylon indoor/outdoor spray paint, as well as a can of Krylon Fusion spray paint, which is generally used on plastic — however, it is unknown what color those paints were or whether they could have been used in the crime.

During a previous visit to Brazier’s home on Nov. 18, police also observed two burnt aerosol cans in a fire pit outside the home. According to the Globe’s report, police were given three different accounts of where those cans came from at the time.

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School’s Football Season Cancelled After Racist Slurs

Wednesday, November 20th, 2013

Officials at the high school in Lunenburg, Massachusetts have cancelled the remainder of its football season in the wake of an incident in which racially charged graffiti was sprayed onto the home of the team’s only black player.  More from NBC News:

Lunenburg, Mass., School Superintendent Loxi Jo Calmes announced Monday that the “remaining football games of the season have been forfeited” — including the traditional Thanksgiving Day game — because of “racial harassment investigations.”

Racial slurs, including the N-word, were found Friday spray-painted on the foundation of the home of freshman and junior varsity athlete Isaac Phillips, 13 — the only black player on the Lunenburg Blue Knights football team, according to NBC affiliate WHDH. Isaac’s father is black and his mother is white, according to the Associated Press.

Anthony J. Phillips, Isaac’s father, told the Worcester Telegram & Gazette he is angry at Lunenburg officials who allegedly concealed racist remarks made by numerous Lunenburg football players during games.

“This is a few bad kids and the coaches are letting them do anything they want to do,” the father told the newspaper.

At a news conference Monday, Calmes thanked locals for gathering at a vigil Sunday night and standing behind Phillips and his family, who she said were victims of an “act of hate.”

Image: Football, via Shutterstock

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High Schooler Punished for Driving Drunk Friend Home

Wednesday, October 16th, 2013

Erin Cox, a high school senior from North Andover, Massachusetts has lost her status as volleyball team captain–and been suspended for 5 games–after she drove to a party to pick up a friend who had called her, saying she was too drunk to drive home.  Cox, police officers verified, had not been drinking.  More from The Associated Press:

North Andover High School’s Erin Cox says she got a call two weeks ago from a friend at a party who said she was too drunk to drive. She said she went to pick up the friend, because she didn’t want the friend driving drunk or getting into a vehicle with an intoxicated driver.

By the time Erin arrived at the party, police were already there. They arrested several students for underage possession of alcohol.

Erin was cleared by police for not drinking or being in the possession of alcohol, but that didn’t stop school officials from punishing her for violating a no tolerance policy for drugs and alcohol, her mother, Eleanor Cox, told WBZ-TV.

‘‘She did what she thought was right, and I’m very proud of her,’’ Eleanor Cox said.

The family has hired a lawyer and filed a lawsuit last week, but a judge ruled the court did not have jurisdiction.

Image: Police siren, via Shutterstock

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High School Athlete Drug Tests Debated

Monday, January 7th, 2013

The question of whether to test high school athletes for performance-enhancing drugs is being debating in a growing number of districts in the wake of doping scandals that have been discovered at a number of schools.  More from The New York Times:

At least three state high school associations — in Texas, Illinois and New Jersey — put in programs to test student-athletes. All three programs were operated by Drug Free Sport. The contracts were worth hundreds of thousands of dollars.

One case that triggered alarm involved Taylor Hooton, 17, of Plano, Tex., whose 2003 suicide widened concerns about high school students’ use of performance-enhancing drugs. Hooton’s father, Don, was among those who lobbied lawmakers for drug-testing programs in high schools.

But a decade later, Don Hooton and others have reversed course, arguing that the programs may provide little benefit to students and society.

“We have a real problem here,” Hooton said of steroid use among high school students. “But we’re not getting at it.”

In 1995, the United States Supreme Court ruled that drug testing for high school athletes was constitutional, and some districts expanded their policies to include middle schools. Proponents of testing at the high school level say that it offers students a way to say no to drugs and that it serves as a deterrent.

But others question the effectiveness of the programs.

In 2007, Dr. Linn Goldberg, head of the division of health promotion and sports medicine at Oregon Health and Science University, published the results of a study of athletes at five high schools that had drug-testing programs and six schools that had deferred enacting a drug-testing policy. Goldberg found that athletes from the two groups did not differ in their alcohol or drug consumption.

Image: Football helmet, via Shutterstock

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Organized Sports Found to Help Teens Manage Weight

Monday, July 23rd, 2012

It won’t surprise anyone that a new study has found that exercise helps teens–or anyone–maintain a healthy weight.  But this study, published in the journal Pediatrics, has found some specific fitness habits can have a more marked effect, including walking or biking to school and participating in high school team sports, more than one if possible.  The New York Times reports:

Though the spread of childhood obesity in the last decade has spurred health authorities to ramp up their efforts to promote youth activity, the new findings are among the first to demonstrate that walking or riding a bike to school actually has an impact on weight gain among high school students. The study also found that while school-based exercise can reduce or stem weight gain, it is sports participation in particular that makes a difference. Physical education classes, the researchers found, did not reduce or prevent weight gain, likely because they do not offer students the same level of regular, challenging exercise as competitive sports.

“I think being a part of some kind of team or organization gives kids the opportunity to have moderate to vigorous activity consistently,” said Keith M. Drake, an author of the study and a postdoctoral research fellow at the Hood Center for Children and Families at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth. “I think a lot of time physical education requirements are not that strict. Kids are not in P.E. that often, and when they are, the physical activity is not that strenuous.”

Image: High school athletes, via Shutterstock.

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