Posts Tagged ‘ high cholesterol ’

High Cholesterol May Impact Fertility

Friday, May 23rd, 2014

Couples–both women and men–who both have high cholesterol levels may find their fertility impacted, according to a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.  More from HealthDay News:

When both the prospective mom and dad had high cholesterol levels, it took longer to conceive compared to those with lower cholesterol levels. The study also found the highest cholesterol levels among the couples who didn’t achieve pregnancy during the year-long study.

“This is the first time that cholesterol levels have been identified as a factor in pregnancy along with known factors, such as age and weight,” said lead researcher Enrique Schisterman, senior investigator and chief of the epidemiology branch at the U.S. Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

Cholesterol is a waxy substance that can build up in the body’s blood vessels, according to the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Genetics and your family history play a role in your cholesterol levels, but so too, do diet and exercise, the institute says.

Schisterman noted that when both the man and the woman have high cholesterol it takes much longer to conceive.

“If the woman has high cholesterol and the man has normal cholesterol, then it takes longer, but not as long as when both have high cholesterol,” Schisterman said.

“When only the man has high cholesterol and the woman has normal levels, it doesn’t seem to have an effect,” he added.

Schisterman noted that while this study shows an association between cholesterol levels and time to conception, what isn’t known is whether high cholesterol causes the delay.

It’s also not clear if taking drugs to lower cholesterol would shorten the time to conception. “We don’t know that yet. Our study was not designed to see the effect of statins,” he said. Statins are medications used to lower cholesterol levels.

Also, it’s possible that diet and exercise, which are known to lower cholesterol, might also reduce the time to conception, Schisterman said.

“Having a healthy diet, exercising and maintaining normal cholesterol levels will help couples become pregnant and have a healthy pregnancy and a healthy child,” he said.

Image: Cholesterol, via Shutterstock

Add a Comment
Back To Parents News Now

About 1 in 3 Children Have High Cholesterol, Study Finds

Friday, March 28th, 2014

Childhood ObesityIn an alarming new study of more than 12,000 children with ages ranging from 9 to 11-years-old, 30 percent of them had “borderline” or “abnormal” cholesterol levels. And about 98 percent of those levels are caused by obesity, lack of exercise, and poor nutrition. According to the study’s author, high cholesterol levels in childhood are the greatest predictor of high cholesterol in adulthood. More from USA TODAY:

Nearly one-third of children may have worrisome levels of cholesterol, putting them at risk for cardiovascular problems decades later, according to a new study.

The study of more than 12,000 9- to 11-year-olds, presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s annual conference in Washington, found that 30 percent of those tested had “borderline” or “abnormal” levels of cholesterol.

“It’s a problem that’s underdiagnosed,” said study author Thomas Seery, a pediatric cardiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital and assistant professor at the Baylor College of Medicine, both in Houston.

The greatest predictor of high cholesterol in adulthood, Seery said, is the rate in childhood.

In 2011, an expert panel convened by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute issued guidelines that called, among other things, for cholesterol screening of all children before and at the end of adolescence. In the Houston study, researchers found that nearly 5,000 of the children were at risk for or had high cholesterol and roughly the same number were obese. It’s not clear whether they were tested for high cholesterol because they had a problem or if their screening was routine.

About 1 percent-2 percent of high cholesterol in children is due to inherited problems with cholesterol regulation, Seery said. The rest is caused by obesity, lack of exercise and a poor diet.

“There’s no question that we are seeing alarming increases in obesity and elevated cholesterol levels in children and adolescents,” said Steven Nissen, chairman of the department of cardiovascular medicine at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio, who was not involved in the study.

Nissen said he is not convinced that screening all kids for high cholesterol is an effective way to approach the problem. He’s concerned that extra screening will lead doctors to prescribe more medications to children.

Any obese child should be counseled about making lifestyle changes, even without knowing his or her cholesterol levels, Nissen said. There’s no proof that screening improves patient health, but it would cost a significant amount to run blood tests on every child, he said.

Seery disagrees, as does Robert Eckel, former president of the American Heart Association. They say universal screening would at least prompt a conversation between doctor and patient about the need for a healthy lifestyle.

“We really need to emphasize prevention, and that begins in childhood,” said Eckel, an endocrinologist and professor of medicine at the University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora. “This could be a good opportunity to sit down with parents and move them in the right direction.”

In other research presented at the conference today, doctors from New York University’s Langone Medical Center in Manhattan reported that married adults were less likely to have cardiovascular disease than people who are single, divorced or widowed. The study analyzed data on more than 3.5 million Americans and found that people who are married have a 5 percent lower risk of having any cardiovascular disease than being single.

In the study of 12,700 9- to 11-year-olds in Houston, researchers found:

• 37 percent had borderline or elevated levels of total cholesterol.

• 32 percent had borderline or low levels of “good” HDL cholesterol.

• 36 percent had borderline or elevated levels of non-HDL cholesterol.

• 46 percent had borderline or elevated levels of triglycerides.

What can you expect from your growing toddler? Take our Toddler Nutrition Quiz to find out!

Picky Eaters: 3 Ways To Encourage Healthy Eating
Picky Eaters: 3 Ways To Encourage Healthy Eating
Picky Eaters: 3 Ways To Encourage Healthy Eating


Image: Closeup view of scales on a floor and kids feet via Shutterstock.

Add a Comment
Back To Parents News Now