Posts Tagged ‘ girls ’

One HPV Vaccine Shot May Be Enough

Tuesday, November 5th, 2013

A single dose of the vaccine against human papillomavirus, a leading cause of cervical cancer, may be enough to immunize a woman against the disease, a new study has found.  Three doses are the current guideline, though research shows that fewer than half of American girls receive the recommended number of doses. More from CNN.com:

“Cervical cancer is a major cause of public health concern, especially in less developed countries where about 85% of cervical cancer occurs,” says study author Mahboobeh Safaeian. “The reason for that is mainly because of lack of screening infrastructure offered.”

Safaeian and her team followed a group of women in Costa Rica who were participating in the National Cancer Institute-funded phase III clinical trial testing the efficacy of Cervarix.  About 20% of these women did not complete the three-dose vaccine regimen. Safaeian compared the groups of women who had received one, two and three doses of the vaccine, as well as women who had antibodies from having been naturally infected.

The researchers found that women vaccinated with a single dose of Cervarix, as opposed to the current CDC recommendation of three, had antibodies against HPV that remained stable in their blood after four years. The findings suggest that the common recommendation for three doses may not be necessary to ensure long-lasting antibodies that prevent HPV.  Safaeian, a researcher for the National Cancer Institute’s Division of Cancer Epidemiology & Genetics, Infections and Immunoepidemiology, says this could have significant implications for women across the world by simplifying the logistics and costs of vaccinations.

“This vaccine is about $130 a dose … It’s just not feasible in a lot of undeveloped countries,” Safaeian explains.

Image: Girl getting a vaccine, via Shutterstock

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Girl Athletes ‘Especially at Risk’ for Concussions

Thursday, October 31st, 2013

Concussions in youth sports are on the rise, and a new report from the Institute of Medicine urges parents of girls to pay special attention, citing a “culture of resistance” that has kept public education efforts from having widespread effect.  More from NBC News:

Despite widespread coverage, damage from concussions is underestimated and blows to the head suffered by young athletes often go unreported, according to a report from the Institute of Medicine released on Wednesday. In addition, football helmets fail to protect against concussions, the report found, although the committee, a group of pediatricians, educators, psychiatrists and engineers, recommended protective gear to prevent other injuries.

The number of athletes aged 19 and younger who were treated for concussions and other sports and recreation-related traumatic brain injuries rose from 150,000 in 2001 to a quarter million in 2009, the most recent year for which data is available. In college athletics, the rate of concussions in more than a dozen sports doubled between the school year that ended in 1989 and the one that ended in 2004.

The committee also found that young women and girls have a higher rate of concussions than boys in the sports they play, including soccer and basketball. And although the rate of concussions in cheerleading remain low compared to other sports, for example, the rate of concussions in the sport increased at a rate of 26 percent each year from 1998 to 2008. That marks a greater rate of increase than for any other sport played by young women at the high school and college levels.

While improved diagnosis may account for at least some of the higher concussion rates “there is probably also a difference in the competitiveness in children and their sports,” said committee member Mayumi Prins, an associate professor in neurosurgery at the UCLA. “Children are being trained earlier in sports and they’re focusing on a single sport rather than diversifying. In the female population we do see that the way girls play sports has changed in the last 10 years — they’re more aggressive.”

Without early diagnosis and proper treatment, teens and young kids are at greater risk of repeated concussions and potential long-term damage. One major factor keeping kids from getting treatment: many think it’s their duty to keep mum about their symptoms,and get back in the game.

Image: Girl playing soccer, via Shutterstock

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Too Many Teen Girls Use Tanning Salons, Despite Cancer Risk

Wednesday, August 21st, 2013

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds that nearly a third of all white teen girls visit tanning salons, despite warnings that tanning increases their risk of a lethal form of skin cancer (as well as wrinkles). In fact, the study revealed that more than 15 percent of girls use tanning beds ten times or more a year.

Here’s more from Today Health:

“We need to encourage young women to embrace their natural, untanned skin colors,” says Gery Guy of the CDC’s division of cancer control, who led the research.

Guy’s team looked at surveys of high school students and young adults from 2010 and 2011, which cover tens of thousands of people interviewed in depth.

“Among non-Hispanic white female high school students, 29.3 percent engaged in indoor tanning and 16.7 percent engaged in frequent indoor tanning during the previous 12 months,” they wrote. “Among non-Hispanic white women aged 18-34 years, 24.9 percent engaged in indoor tanning and 15.1 percent engaged in frequent indoor tanning during the previous 12 months.”

That’s even though people who use indoor tanning treatments raise their risk of melanoma—the deadliest form of skin cancer—by 59 to 75 percent. People who use tanning booths or lights before they are 25 raise the risk by as much as 100 percent.

“This widespread use is of great concern given the elevated risk of skin cancer among younger users and frequent users,” Guy’s team wrote in the Journal of the American Medical Association’s journal JAMA Internal Medicine. Melanoma kills more than 9,000 Americans a year.

Image: Girl’s legs in tanning bed, via Shutterstock

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Anorexic Girls Often Display Autistic Traits

Thursday, August 8th, 2013

Girls who suffer from the eating disorder anorexia often exhibit some traits and behaviors that are similar to those who are diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to research by Simon Baron-Cohen of Cambridge University’s Autism Research Centre.  The anorexic girls, Cohen found, suffered an above average number of autistic traits.  More from Reuters:

They were also found to have an above-average interest in systems and order, and below-average scores in empathy – a profile similar, but less pronounced, to that seen in people with autism, suggesting the two disorders may have common underlying features, Baron-Cohen said.

“Traditionally, anorexia has been viewed purely as an eating disorder. This is quite reasonable, since the girls’ dangerously low weight and their risk of malnutrition or even death has to be the highest priority,” he said.

“But this new research is suggesting that underlying the surface behavior, the mind of a person with anorexia may share a lot with the mind of a person with autism. In both conditions, there is a strong interest in systems. In girls with anorexia, they have latched onto a system that concerns body weight, shape, and food intake.”

People with autism have varying levels of impairment across three main areas – social interaction and empathy or understanding, repetitive behavior and interests, and language and communication.

Cohen noted that autism and anorexia share certain features, such as rigid attitudes and behaviors, a tendency to be very self-focused, and a fascination with detail. Both disorders also share similar differences in the structure and function of brain regions involved in social perception.

The findings, researchers say, could help in the development of new treatments for anorexia.

Image: Anorexia sign, via Shutterstock

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The Children’s Place Apologizes for Offensive Girls’ T-Shirt

Wednesday, August 7th, 2013

The popular children’s clothing store The Children’s Place has apologized after a photo of a t-shirt went viral and prompted accusations that the shirt perpetuates the stereotype that girls are more interested in shopping than math.  As Boston.com reports, the store apologized via Twitter, saying, “We take feedback from our customers seriously. We pulled the tshirt from our stores and express apologies to anyone we may have offended.”

Apparently there are at least two versions of the shirt, with one customer, who purchased her shirt in Canada, posting a photo that shows the “Math” box checked along with “Shopping,” “Music,” and “Dancing.”

The company’s Facebook page has been flooded with comments from some parents who are enraged at the shirt’s seemingly anti-intellectual message, and others who feel the issue is much ado about nothing.

Image via Twitter

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