Posts Tagged ‘ elementary school ’

Should Schools Ban Unvaccinated Kids?

Friday, January 30th, 2015

forbid children signOne family’s story might give you a different and more personal perspective on a continually debated issue: vaccines.

For the past four and a half years, Carl Krawitt and his wife, Jodi, have had to do something that no parent ever wants to do—watch their 6-year-old son, Rhett, battle leukemia. And after finishing numerous rounds of chemotherapy treatment, doctors say Rhett is in remission.

But now another battle has begun— the battle to keep Rhett as healthy as possible, despite being unvaccinated. Rhett cannot be vaccinated until his immune system is strong enough, which could take months. And if Rhett contracts a disease, he is at a higher risk for complications and even death.

While Rhett can rely on the power of herd immunity, it’s not guaranteed when he lives in Marin County, California, which has the highest rate of children in the Bay Area who have been opted out of immunizations. In fact, Rhett’s elementary school has a 7 percent personal belief exemption rate, which is nearly three times more than the statewide average.

In light of the current measles’ outbreak on the west coast, Carl is speaking up for his son — by requesting that his elementary school bans all unvaccinated students, except for those who, like his son, cannot be vaccinated for medical reasons. “It’s very emotional for me,” he told NPR. “If you choose not to immunize your own child and your own child dies because they get measles, OK, that’s your responsibility, that’s your choice. But if your child gets sick and gets my child sick and my child dies, then…your action has harmed my child.”

And Rhett is not alone in having a weakened immune system. According to oncologist Dr. Robert Goldsby, “there are hundreds of other kids in the Bay Area who are going through cancer therapy, and it’s not fair to them.”

However, at this time, Marin County doesn’t have any confirmed or suspected cases of measles, so no immediate action can be made without approval from county health officers. However, “if the outbreak progresses and we start seeing more and more cases, then this is a step we might want to consider,” said Matt Willis, Marin County’s health officer.

We want to hear from you—let us know what you think! Is Carl Krawitt’s request to ban students fair? Or do you think it goes too far?

Caitlin St John is an Editorial Assistant for Parents.com who splits her time between New York City and her hometown on Long Island. She’s a self-proclaimed foodie who loves dancing and anything to do with her baby nephew. Follow her on Twitter: @CAITYstjohn

More About Measles

Vaccines for Babies and Older Kids
Vaccines for Babies and Older Kids
Vaccines for Babies and Older Kids

Image: Forbid children sign via Shutterstock

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How a Mom Got Her 4-Year-Old Son Expelled From Preschool

Thursday, August 28th, 2014

Child Expelled After His Mom's Facebook PostHave you ever taken to social media to vent your frustrations? One mom in Florida did just that — and what she wrote ended up getting her son expelled!

Running late to drop her son off for picture day at Sonshine Christian Academy last week, Ashley Habat told a school administrator that she felt the preschool should have given her more notice about the approaching picture day.

Afterwards, still upset, Ashley went home and posted on Facebook: “Why is that every single day, there is something new I dislikes about Will’s school? Are my standards really too high, or are people working in the education field really just that ignorant.” She tagged Sonshine in her post, but the next day, the school called her for a meeting to say that her son, Will, was going to be expelled.

“I was in shock,” Ashley told WJXT-TV. “Why would you expel a 4-year-old over something his mom posts on her private Facebook page [that] only people on her friends list can see?”

The letter of dismissal explained: “Your relationship with Sonshine did not get off to a very good start the first day of school … you utilized social media to call into question not only the integrity, but the intelligence of our staff. These actions are also consistent with sowing discord, which is spoken of in the handbook  you signed.”

In a time when social media is at our fingertips and where mom bloggers often have vocal power, we’re wondering: Was Sonshine out of line? How do YOU think this situation should have been handled?

Also, take our quiz to find out how your child’s school stacks up.

Mom Confessions: My Latest Parenting Fail
Mom Confessions: My Latest Parenting Fail
Mom Confessions: My Latest Parenting Fail

Photo of woman using phone courtesy of Shutterstock.

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Kids Reportedly Fed Dog Treats at PA Elementary School

Wednesday, June 11th, 2014

A teacher’s aide in a rural Pennsylvania elementary school has allegedly fed fourth grade students pet treats the kids were told were cookies or crackers.  Reuters has more:

It was unclear how many children ate the pet treats, but the part-time worker at Upper Frederick elementary school in New Hanover gave them to about 75 students on Thursday, Richard Faidley, the Boyerton Area School District superintendent, said in a statement seen by Reuters.

It was unclear what might have motivated the aide to hand out the pet treats to students. The worker at the school, which is about 30 miles (48 km) northwest of Philadelphia, has been placed on leave pending the results of an investigation, the statement said.

“The treats may have been misrepresented as cookies or crackers,” Faidley said in the statement released on Friday.

Faidley could not be reached for comment on Saturday.

“Our research on the product indicates that the treat ingredients would not be harmful to people, with the exception for those individuals with specific food allergies,” Faidley’s statement said.

One student at the school, Gabriel Moore, told local television station WFMZ that he ate three of the treats.

“She made it look like it was a joke that they were dog treats and then she came around and said, ‘No they are cookies. They are fine,’”  Gabriel told the station.

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Lunches Taken from Elementary School Students Whose Bills Weren’t Paid

Friday, January 31st, 2014

As many as 40 children at a Salt Lake City elementary school had their school lunches taken away after the school discovered the children had outstanding balances on their lunch accounts, as The Salt Lake Tribune reports:

“It was pretty traumatic and humiliating,” said Erica Lukes, whose 11-year-old daughter had her cafeteria lunch taken from her as she stood in line Tuesday at Uintah Elementary School, 1571 E. 1300 South.

Lukes said as far as she knew, she was all paid up. “I think it’s despicable,” she said. “These are young children that shouldn’t be punished or humiliated for something the parents obviously need to clear up.”

Jason Olsen, a Salt Lake City District spokesman, said the district’s child-nutrition department became aware that Uintah had a large number of students who owed money for lunches.

As a result, the child-nutrition manager visited the school and decided to withhold lunches to deal with the issue, he said.

But cafeteria workers weren’t able to see which children owed money until they had already received lunches, Olsen explained.

The workers then took those lunches from the students and threw them away, he said, because once food is served to one student it can’t be served to another.

Children whose lunches were taken were given milk and fruit instead.

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Healthy Lunch Ideas for Kids
Healthy Lunch Ideas for Kids
Healthy Lunch Ideas for Kids

Image: School lunch, via Shutterstock

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Anti-Bullying Curriculum Shows Results at Elementary, Middle Schools

Wednesday, January 29th, 2014

An anti-bullying curriculum that was tested at three elementary and middle schools in Illinois has shown promising results, including reported improvements in key areas including respect, positive communication and social behaviors, awareness and understanding of bullying, school climate, and self-esteem.  More from ScienceDaily.com:

“It’s just as important to teach empathy to students as it is to teach them science,” says Jennifer E. Beebe, assistant professor of counseling and human services at Canisius College. “We can increase consciousness of positive behaviors by incorporating those ideals into the educational system. Many students may not learn them otherwise.”

Beebe completed a study which involved disrespect, bullying behaviors and physical aggression with 300 elementary and middle school students in three schools in Illinois. The behaviors were negatively impacting students’ academic achievement and school attendance. In many cases, these behaviors crossed over into the cyber world. Beebe’s research was sponsored by a grant from The Canisius College School of Education and Human Services.

Students learned several tenets from martial arts during a 12-week long mentoring program which was integrated into students’ regular classroom lessons for approximately one hour. “Students were taught such concepts as loyalty, obedience and respect.” Beebe adds.

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Back to School: Dealing With Meanness and Bullying
Back to School: Dealing With Meanness and Bullying
Back to School: Dealing With Meanness and Bullying

Image: Classroom, via Shutterstock

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