Posts Tagged ‘ CPSC ’

Feds: Stop Using Nap Nanny Recliners

Wednesday, June 4th, 2014

Federal officials are urging parents to stop using “Nap Nanny” infant recliners in the wake of the suffocation death of an 8-month-old New Jersey girl.  The baby’s death was the sixth fatality linked to the recliner, and the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is warning parents to throw away Nap Nanny recliners they may already own, and to avoid buying used recliners at yard sales or online auctions.  More from ABC News:

CPSC Communications Director Scott Wolfson said parents should avoid the recliners at yard sales, as hand-me-downs or in online auctions.

“Our message to parents is clear: Stop using it. It’s dangerous,” Wolfson said. “There’s been six deaths already, and we don’t want another child to die unnecessarily.”

About 165,000 Nap Nanny and Nap Nanny Chill recliners were sold between 2009 and 2012. Nap Nannies — which are no longer sold in stores — were recalled last year, but for months the company that made the portable recliner refused to pull it from shelves or offer refunds, instead insisting on the product’s safety when used properly.

In a statement, an official with the company, now out of business for two years, told ABC News it was heartbroken for the families who have lost a child, but said the Nap Nanny was never intended for use in a crib.

The CPSC sued Baby Matters, LLC, the company that manufactured Nap Nanny, in 2012, and later that year, before the company went out of business, a number of major retailers, including Amazon.com and Toys R Us, stopped selling the products.

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Highchair-Related Injuries Spike; 9,400 Kids Hurt Each Year

Tuesday, December 10th, 2013

More than 9,400 children are treated each year in U.S. emergency rooms after suffering injuries in their highchairs, most often from falling out of poorly secured chairs, according to a new study published by the Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. The numbers represent a significant rise in the number of highchair-related injuries–a 22 percent jump between the years 2003 and 2010.  More from US News:

Despite the fact that millions of defective highchairs have been recalled in recent years, researchers at the hospital’s Center for Injury Research and Policy found that the number of children under the age of 3 who were treated in emergency departments between 2003 and 2010 increased by 22 percent. On average, one child each hour was treated for such an injury, according to the study, published in the journal Clinical Pediatrics.

“Families may not think about the dangers associated with the use of high chairs,” said Gary Smith, director of the Center for Injury Research, in a statement. “High chairs are typically used in kitchens and dining areas, so when a child falls from the elevated height of the high chair, he is often falling head first onto a hard surface such as tile or wood flooring with considerable force.

Most often, the children seen were treated for closed head injuries, which include concussions and internal head injuries. More than one-third of the children injured (37 percent) were treated for closed head injuries.

Not only were closed head injuries the most common injury associated with highchairs, but they were also the type that saw the greatest increase between 2003 and 2010 – up nearly 90 percent, from 2,558 in 2003 to 4,789 in 2010.

Additionally, 33 percent were treated for bumps and bruises, and 19 percent were treated for cuts associated with falls from highchairs. Overall, 93 percent of the injuries involved a fall from a highchair or booster seat.

When information was available for what children were doing just before a fall from a highchair or booster seat, two-thirds of them were climbing or standing in the chair, which suggests that the chair’s safety restraints were either not being used or were ineffective.

Parents are urged to make sure their children are properly strapped into their high chairs and booster seats. If you are concerned about the safety of your highchairs, check the Parents.com Recall Finder, sign up for our Recall Alerts email, or check the Consumer Product Safety Commission’s website to see whether your model has been recalled.

Watch this video for more tips on keeping your baby safe in his high chair:

Prevent High Chair Injuries: How to Keep Your Child Safe
Prevent High Chair Injuries: How to Keep Your Child Safe
Prevent High Chair Injuries: How to Keep Your Child Safe

 

Plus: Find a broad selection of high chairs at Shop Parents.

Image: Baby in highchair, via Shutterstock

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Bassinets and Cradles Get New Federal Safety Standards

Friday, October 4th, 2013

The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has approved new safety standards for cradles and bassinets, designed to prevent deaths and injuries that can happen in poorly constructed versions.  More than 130 children died between 2007 and 2013 because of faulty bassinets and cradles, and the CPSC is aware of 426 incidents involving them.  The new guidelines include:

  1. a clarification of the scope of the bassinet/cradle standard;
  2. a change to the pass/fail criterion for the mattress flatness test;
  3. an exemption from the mattress flatness requirement for bassinets that are less than 15 inches across;
  4. the addition of a removable bassinet bed stability requirement; and
  5. a change to the stability test procedure, requiring the use of a newborn CAMI dummy rather than an infant CAMI dummy.

The new standards, which define “bassinet or cradle” as a small bed designed primarily to provide sleeping accommodations for infants, supported by free standing legs, a stationary frame or stand, a wheeled base, a rocking base, or swing relative to a stationary base. In a stationary (non-rocking or swinging) position, a bassinet/cradle is intended to have a sleep surface less than or equal to 10 degrees from horizontal.  Bassinets and cradles are not meant to be used past the age of 5 months.

A major impetus behind the new guidelines is the prevention of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).  Check your own sleep safety habits by reading this article by Parents.com’s health director:  The Safe-Sleep Rules Parents Break

Image: Bassinet, via Shutterstock

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Federal Standards Set to Ensure Stroller Safety

Monday, May 13th, 2013

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has, for the first time, voted to set federal safety standards for strollers.  The commission’s vote, which was unanimous at 3-0, includes a series of previously voluntary regulations, and it adds specific provisions to prevent strollers from having a risk of injuries including scissoring, shearing, and pinching, most of which are associated with folding or foldable strollers.  Last summer, Peg Perego recalled 223,000 strollers because of entrapment and strangulation hazards, and thousands of Kolcraft strollers were also recalled because of a finger amputation hazard.

For the new federal standards, CPSC staff reviewed more than 1,200 stroller-related incidents, including four fatalities and nearly 360 injuries that occurred from 2008 through 2012. The agency believes that the new standard will help to reduce the risks associated with the majority of the hazard patterns identified in reviewing the stroller incidents. Hazards include wheel breakage or detachment, hinge issues, car seat attachment, handlebar failures, and structural integrity issues.  The injuries that have resulted from these problems include finger amputation, falls, and head entrapment.

The proposed standard has a 75-day “comment period” before it is added to the Federal Register, during which time the public can post comments at www.Regulations.gov.  The CPSC recommends that the standard become effective 18 months after publication of the final rule in the Federal Register.

Image: Mother and baby with stroller, via Shutterstock

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New Play Yard Safety Rules Take Effect This Week

Tuesday, February 26th, 2013

New federal standards will begin to govern play yards, sometimes called play pens, starting February 28, the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has announced.  The new standards are part of the Danny Keysar Child Product Safety Notification Act, or “Danny’s Law,” named for a Chicago child who was killed in 1998 when a previously recalled play yard in which he was napping collapsed, suffocating him.

According to the CPSC, play yards that meet the new safety standard must have:

  • Side rails that do not form a sharp V when the product is folded. This prevents a child from strangling in the side rail.
  • Stronger corner brackets to prevent sharp-edged cracks and to prevent a side-rail collapse.
  • Sturdier mattress attachments to the play yard floor to prevent children from getting trapped or hurt.

See below for a CPSC poster detailing the new regulations.

Image via CPSC

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