Posts Tagged ‘ Consumer Product Safety Commission ’

Two Brands of Dressers Recalled; Three Toddlers Reportedly Killed

Thursday, January 31st, 2013

Three toddlers have reportedly died in accidents associated with their bedroom dressers tipping over, prompting the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to announce recalls of the two furniture brands responsible.  Natart Chelsea Dressers, made by the Canadian company Gemme Juvenile Inc., and the popular California brand Million Dollar Baby Dressers are the two companies issuing recalls and offering parents retrofits for drawers and tip-over restraints to attach the dressers to a wall.

Here’s more information on each recall, and what to do if you have either dresser:

Natart Chelsea Dressers from Gemme Juvenile, Inc.:

When the dresser drawers are pulled all the way out and then the additional weight of a young child is applied, the dresser’s center of gravity can be altered and result in instability of the product and consequently tip over. A child can become injured in the fall or suffocate under the weight of the fallen dresser.

This recall involves the Chelsea three-drawer windowed dresser bearing model number 3033. The dressers were sold in five finishes Cappuccino, Cappuccino with a brown top, Ebony, Ebony with a brown top, and Antique or French White. A sticker with the word “Natart” and the firm’s logo is affixed to the inside of the top drawer. In addition, most dressers will have the model number, “Natart Juvenile,” “Made in Canada” and “Chelsea 3 Drawer Dresser” printed on another label located on the back of the dresser. The recalled dresser measures 35-inches high by 21- inches deep by 39- inches wide and is part of the Chelsea children’s bedroom furniture collection. The dresser is composed of engineered wood, solid wood and wood veneers. The top drawer has two clear plastic windows in front.

The dressers were sold at Furniture Kidz and other independent juvenile specialty stores and at Baby.com from January 2005 to December 2010 for between $600 and $900.

Consumers should immediately stop using and place the dresser out of a child’s reach. Free retrofit kits that contain wall anchor straps are being offered to consumers to help prevent the dresser from tipping. The kits can be ordered by visiting www.chelseawallanchors.com, www.NatartJuvenile.com, emailing the firm at safety@chelseawallanchors.com or calling toll-free at (855) 364-2619 between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday.

Million Dollar Baby Dressers by Bexco Enterprises, Inc.:

When a young child climbs up on open dresser drawers, the dresser becomes unstable and poses the risk of tip over and entrapment. CPSC and Million Dollar Baby have received two reports of deaths associated with these dressers. An 11-month-old boy from Tulsa, Okla. and a 20-month-old girl from Camarillo, Calif. were reported to have suffocated when their dressers tipped over, entrapping them between the dresser and the floor. The cause of the deaths has not been determined.

This voluntary recall involves “Emily” style four-drawer dressers with model numbers M4712, M4722, M4732 and M4742 and similar “Ryan” dressers with the model M4733. The dressers were sold in five finishes: Cherry, Ebony, Espresso, Honey Oak and White. The model number, “Million Dollar Baby” and “MADE IN TAIWAN” are printed on a label located on the back of the dresser. The recalled dresser measures 33-inches high by 20-inches deep by 40-inches wide and is a part of the DaVinci children’s bedroom furniture collection. The dressers are made from pine and wood composite.

The recalled dressers were sold at JCPenney and independent juvenile specialty stores nationwide and online at Amazon.com, BabiesRUs.com, BabyUniverse.com and other online retailers from January 2006 through June 2010 for between $230 and $300.

The Million Dollar Baby dressers met applicable voluntary standards when first produced, but a May 2009 voluntary industry standard, and subsequent revisions published in October 2009 and November 2009, requires that tip-over restraints be sold with the dressers. The restraints attach to a wall, framing or other support to help prevent dresser tip-over entrapment hazards to young children. Million Dollar Baby is offering free retrofit kits with tip-over restraints to consumers who have older dressers. Included in the kit is an adhesive warning label that consumers are to attach to the dresser, which describes how to prevent tip-over injuries.

Consumers should immediately stop using and keep the dresser out of a child’s reach. Consumers can contact Million Dollar Baby to receive a free retrofit kit that contains a wall anchor strap, which attaches to the dresser and wall to help prevent the dresser from tipping. The kits can be ordered by visiting the firm’s website at www.themdbfamily.com/safety2 and click on Safety HQ or call toll-free at (888) 673-6652 between 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. PT Monday through Friday.

 

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Report: Button Batteries Pose Increasing Danger to Kids

Friday, August 31st, 2012

A new report from the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) provides more evidence of the dangers of tiny button batteries. Used to power television remotes, toys, hearing aids, greeting cards and more, the batteries are sending a growing number of children to the emergency room.

The CPSC report found that between 1997 and 2010, 40,000 children under age 13 visited emergency rooms after swallowing the tiny batteries, and 14 children died. The number of children treated for ingesting the batteries increased 2.5-fold during this period, HealthDay News reports.

The batteries pose the biggest threat if they get stuck in a child’s esophagus, where they can cause serious burns in as little as two hours and fatal bleeding after two weeks, the CPSC report said.

If you see a child swallow a battery, or suspect he has, it’s important to visit the emergency room right away; significant damage can occur quickly, Dr. Amanda Porro, a pediatrician at Miami Children’s Hospital, told HealthDay News. She urges parents to store the batteries out of the reach of children.

The CPSC wants products with button batteries to be designed so that kids can’t access the batteries. Senator Jay Rockefeller IV, (D-W.Va.), introduced a bill last year that would require all products with button batteries to be childproof.

Image: Button batteries via Shutterstock.

 

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Strollers Recalled Due to Finger Amputation Hazard

Monday, June 18th, 2012

A popular brand of baby strollers made by Kolcraft has been recalled after three children have reportedly had their fingers amputated and two adults have smashed their fingers in the stroller’s locking mechanism.  CNN.com reports:

Approximately 36,000 defective strollers were sold in the United States and Canada between January 2006 and June 2012, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission. Children and adults have had their fingers caught in the opening formed when locking and unlocking the hinge mechanism on the stroller, according to the commission.

The recall involves the Kolcraft Contours Options three- and four-wheeled strollers. Strollers included in the recall have model numbers starting with ZL002, ZL005, ZL008, ZL015 and ZL018. On the ZL002 model, the number and date of manufacture is printed on a sticker above the left wheel. On the ZL005, ZL008, ZL015 and ZL018 models, the model number and date of manufacture is printed on a label sewn into the edge of back of the stroller seat pad.

Manufactured in China, and sold nationwide at children’s specialty stores and online at various retailers, the strollers cost between $150 and $160, according to a statement released by the safety commission.

Repair kits are being made available to owners of the specific models identified. Consumers are urged not to use the stroller and contact Kolcraft for more information on the recall.

Parents can visit this Kolcraft website for more information.

Image via http://www.kolcraft.com/

 

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Commission: Magnetic Stress Balls Dangerous to Children

Monday, March 12th, 2012

A number of brands of small magnetic balls that are designed to alleviate stress in adults are causing serious problems for children, because kids are swallowing them and requiring serious abdominal surgery as a result.  CNN.com reports:

They are powerful pea-size magnets marketed as stress relievers for harried adults but called a safety risk for children by the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

The magnets are sold under the brand names Buckyballs and Nanospheres among others.

“We want parents to be aware of the danger associated with these innocent-looking magnets,” safety commission Chairman Inez Tenenbaum said in a November statement. “The potential for serious injury and death if multiple magnets are swallowed demands that parents and medical professionals be aware of this hidden hazard and know how to treat a child in distress.”

The Consumer Product Safety Commission then reported 22 incidents involving the magnets from 2009 through October. “Of the reported incidents, 17 involved magnet ingestion and 11 required surgical removal of the magnets. When a magnet has to be removed surgically, it often requires the repair of the child’s damaged stomach and intestines,” the commission statement said.

The Buckyballs website has posted a public service announcement video reminding parents that their product is not intended for children.  Five warnings appear on the product’s packaging as well.

Image: Buckyballs, via http://everyjoe.com/

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