Posts Tagged ‘ child travel ’

Another Airline Creates Kid-Free Zones on its Planes

Monday, August 26th, 2013

The Singaporean airline Scoot is the latest company to ban children 12 and under from areas of its planes. Malaysia Airlines and AirAsia X previously established child-free sections on their planes, and it’s part of a larger, ongoing trend of businesses with “no kids allowed” policies.

Here’s more on Scoot’s child ban from ABC News:

For a $14 upgrade, Scoot passengers can sit within the “ScootinSilence” area, a 41-seat cabin prohibiting anyone under the age of 12 under. The child-free zone advertises itself under the auspice of ensured peace and quiet. It also offers additional legroom via Super or S-T-R-E-T-C-H seats, “offering 35″ pitch – “4 more inches than the standard economy seat,” according to the carrier’s website.

Scoot is not the first to kick kids out of certain areas. Malaysian Airlines has long denied children access to first class and introduced an adults-only section in economy in 2012. Meanwhile, AirAsia introduced a “Quiet Zone” to its aircrafts last year.

While offering child-free zones may seem extreme to some, it beats being bumped off a flight for tending to an unruly toddler. That’s what happened to a Rhode Island family flying back from Turks and Caicos last year on JetBlue. At the time, the airline said the decision had been made at the captain’s discretion after a prolonged period of disruption prior to takeoff.

The anti-kid trend is reflected in other areas of the hospitality industry, with an increasing number of restaurants banning children.

 

Readers, what do you think of child-free zones on airplanes?

Image: Toddler on plane, via Shutterstock

 

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AirAsia X Begins Kid-Free Zone Program on Flights

Tuesday, February 5th, 2013

Children under age 12 will be banned from the first seven rows of airplanes making long flights to China, Taiwan, Japan, Korea, Australia, and Nepal beginning this week.  The area, called “Quiet Zone,” is supposed to protect passengers’ peace of mind from the intrusions that noisy or fussy children can bring to an airline flight.  More from CNN:

The child-free area, called the “Quiet Zone,” has softer lighting and is sectioned off from the rest of the plane by toilets and bulkheads, the theory being you won’t be able to hear the kids who are toward the back of the plane.

Still, anyone who’s been within 100 meters of a screaming child will know that their cries won’t be stifled by a few partition curtains.

Just as cigarette smoke could waft into the non-smoking areas before it was banned, so too will noise, said George Hobica, founder of Airfarewatchdog.com, speaking to NBC news when AirAsia X’s new option was announced last year.

“If you were just one row away from the smoking section, you still got the smoke,” he said. “And you’ll still hear the screams … if a child has strong lungs.”

Last year, Malaysia Airlines banned children under age 2 from its first-class cabins, and restricted children’s access to other areas of their planes.

Image: Toddler looking at airplanes, via Shutterstock

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Mom: ‘Airline Lost Track of My Daughter’

Friday, August 17th, 2012

A San Francisco mother is alleging that United Airlines failed to keep track of her 10-year-old daughter, who was flying to summer camp on her own and was supposed to be tracked by a child-care service offered by the airline.  MSNBC.com reports:

Ten-year-old Phoebe was headed for a summer camp in Traverse City, Mich., when she boarded her flight from San Francisco in June. But she failed to make her connection in Chicago because the person hired to help her make the plane change — a United contractor — never showed up.

After getting the call from the camp counselor, Annie Klebahn called United, who insisted her daughter was already in Michigan. “So at that point is when I really knew that they had lost her at some level; they didn’t know where she was,” Klebahn told NBC News. “All the worst possible things go through your mind as a mom when you think you have no idea where your child is and she’s 2,000 miles away.”

Phoebe said a United employee eventually walked her to a waiting room for unaccompanied minors.

“I asked several times to call my mom because I knew she’d be worried because no one really knew where I was,” Phoebe said. “But they kept saying, ‘Hang out a minute, we’re busy.’”

Image: Empty airport waiting room, via Shutterstock

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