Posts Tagged ‘ centers for disease control ’

Why IUDs Are Becoming the Birth Control of Choice for Many Women

Tuesday, February 24th, 2015

IUDsMore women than ever before are choosing intrauterine devices (IUDs) and implants to prevent pregnancy, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Despite a decline in users for nearly 20 years because of safety concerns, improved IUDs and implants are now a safer and more effective form of birth control.

“Among U.S. women aged 15 to 44, the use of these long-term but reversible contraceptives rose from 1.5 percent in 2002 to 7.2 percent in 2011-2013,” reports Health Day. And the use of implants also tripled during the same period, according to Time.com.

This method of protection is a great option for women who aren’t ready to start a family because IUDs can last between 3 and 10 years. Also, if the usage of IUDs and implants continue to increase, the amount of unplanned pregnancies is likely to decrease.

An IUD or implant is always in place, and women don’t have to take extra steps or rely on their partners to avoid becoming pregnant,” reports The Huffington Post. “Some women experience lighter or no periods after their IUDs have been in place for several months.” Plus, an IUD is 99 percent effective with little fuss, compared to birth control pills (91 percent effective only if taken at the same time daily) and male condoms (82 percent effective only if used correctly).

Women may currently opt for other, less expensive methods of birth control because an IUD currently costs more than $1,000. But the Affordable Care Act requires health insurance companies to cover birth control expenses at no cost, which may increase the use of this type of birth control even more.

Tell us: Would you prefer this no-worry solution for yourself?

Caitlin St John is an Editorial Assistant for Parents.com who splits her time between New York City and her hometown on Long Island. She’s a self-proclaimed foodie who loves dancing and anything to do with her baby nephew. Follow her on Twitter:@CAITYstjohn

Are You Pregnant? How to Know for Sure
Are You Pregnant? How to Know for Sure
Are You Pregnant? How to Know for Sure

Image: Photo of an IUD via Shutterstock

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U.S. Birth Rates Still Declining

Monday, January 19th, 2015

Woman and graph chart with decreasing lineWith the recession and the economic downturn, which began in 2008, U.S. birth rates declined to an all-time low in 2013. Millennial women wondered if they could afford raising kids, with some choosing either to give birth later…or not at all.

The Centers for Disease Control recently confirmed the continued decrease in births, noting that birth rates in 2013 dropped 1 percent from 2012, with the number also at an all-time low for Millennial women.

“Birth rates for women in their 20s declined to record lows in 2013, but rose for women in their 30s and late 40s. The rate for women in their early 40s was unchanged,” reports HealthDay. And the average age of mothers increased, as women continued to wait longer to get pregnant and have a baby.

Even teen pregnancy hit an all-time low (which may or may not have been the result of teen girls watching “16 and Pregnant”). Fertility rates also reached an all-time low between 2012 and 2013, decreasing by 1 percent as well. In addition, C-section delivery rate declined along with pre-term birth rates.

Despite all this, some experts still believe birth rates may start trending upward as the economy starts to improve, notes HealthDay.

Sherry Huang is a Features Editor for Parents.com who covers baby-related content. She loves collecting children’s picture books and has an undeniable love for cookies of all kinds. Her spirit animal would be Beyoncé Pad Thai. Follow her on Twitter @sherendipitea


Birth Stories: Unmedicated Childbirth
Birth Stories: Unmedicated Childbirth
Birth Stories: Unmedicated Childbirth

Image: Woman and a decreasing graph via Shutterstock via Shutterstock via Shutterstock

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CDC Report: Single Mom and Teen Births Declining

Wednesday, August 13th, 2014

There are fewer people eligible to be on MTV’s Teen Mom, according to the latest stats from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The report shows a continued decline in single motherhood, in all groups but the over-35 segment. Now, only 4 out of every 10 births occur out of wedlock—and more than half of those “single mom” births are within cohabiting couples who just haven’t decided to make their union official.

The biggest decline in birth rate occurred in the 15-to-17-year-old age bracket, where the number of births fell by almost a third over the last five years—and the older-teen birth rate also declined by more than 25 percent.

This slightly contradicts some earlier figures in a Johns Hopkins study, which showed that nearly 60 percent of births to the Millennial generation had occurred out of wedlock.

Still, both sets of data show that the wife-then-mom model may not be the scenario for many modern-day moms.

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Mom Confessions: My Latest Parenting Fail
Mom Confessions: My Latest Parenting Fail
Mom Confessions: My Latest Parenting Fail

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Good News! 3 Out of 4 Kids Eat Fruits, Veggies Daily

Wednesday, July 16th, 2014

Consider it an old wives’ tale that kids turn their noses up at fruits and veggies. The Centers for Disease Control just released the results of a health survey, that shows that more than 75 percent of kids eat fruit daily, while a whopping 92 percent got at least one helping of veggies every day.

While those results are a sign that kids at least get some plant-based nutrients in their diet, the study didn’t assess how many servings of each kids received (children should get at least a cup of each per day, and a variety), and also didn’t differentiate highly between veggies. (Meaning that it’s likely that at least some of that veggie consumption came in the form of the kid favorite, French fries.)

The study also found that younger kids (between ages 2 and 5) often ate more fruit than teens (only 6 of 10 teens ate fruit, compared to 90 percent of preschoolers). The numbers were closer for veggies (is it the fry factor?): 93 percent of kids ages 2 to 11 ate veggies, while 90 percent of teens did.

While more study needs to be done to determine if kids are reaching their recommended daily intake of fruits and veggies, doctors recommend upping kids’ portions by making all snacks fruits and veggies, and including produce at every meal.

Tell us: How do you do at giving you and your child the recommended daily allowances of fruits and veggies? Find out if you’re feeding your toddler right with our quiz.

How to Eat Healthy: Raising Nutrition-Smart Kids
How to Eat Healthy: Raising Nutrition-Smart Kids
How to Eat Healthy: Raising Nutrition-Smart Kids

Image: girl with oranges by gorillaimages/Shutterstock.com

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