Posts Tagged ‘ bullying ’

Here’s ANOTHER Reason Why Too Much TV is Bad for Your Tot

Friday, July 17th, 2015

Boy being bulliedIf your toddler watches hours of television, he may be more susceptible to being bullied in middle school, according to new research.

The study, which was published in the Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, found that with each additional hour (above the average of approximately 1.5 hours each day) a child viewed a TV program, there was an 11 percent increase in the amount he or she was bullied in middle school.

Researchers from the University of Montreal followed nearly 2,000 2-year-olds who were taking part in the Quebec Longitudinal Study of Child Development. Children were asked about how often they watched TV, and parents were asked about whether their child’s behavior was impulsive or aggressive. Years later, when the children reached sixth grade, researchers administered a questionnaire to find out how often the children were teased or bullied.

The findings were clear: more than about two hours of TV watching per day takes away from engaging activities where children learn how to socialize, according to psychologist and the study’s coauthor Linda Pagani. And the pattern remained even after family characteristics (income, functioning, and mother’s education level) and the child’s behavior were taken into account.

Related: Teaching TV Responsibility

However, experts note that cutting TV out of your toddler’s daily routine doesn’t mean she won’t be bullied. It’s important for parents to encourage their children to engage in activities—and when kids do tune into their favorite show, parents can play a more active role by discussing it alongside them.

Caitlin St John is an Editorial Assistant for Parents.com who splits her time between New York City and her hometown on Long Island. Follow her on Twitter: @CAITYstjohn.

How to Identify Bullying
How to Identify Bullying
How to Identify Bullying

Image: Boy being bullied via Shutterstock

Add a Comment

Girls Can Overcome Bullying More Than Boys With Mom’s Help

Friday, April 3rd, 2015

Bullied boyBullied children can often display — and become tolerant of — negative behavior, but a new study determined that a mother’s warmth can prevent aggression and antisocial behavior in some kids, especially girls.

The study analyzed data collected from more than 1,000 children, over the age of 8, on whether they had been bullied; about 68 percent reported having been bullied within the last month. Researchers also visited the families at home to evaluate family conflicts and how a mother acted toward her children — if she was warm and showed pride/pleasure, or if she was cold and harsh. (For this particular study, fathers were not included.)

Girls who received affection and who communicated well with their moms were less likely to internalize the bullying and feel like a victim. But even if boys received maternal warmth, they still absorbed the negative effects of bullying, and antisocial behavior actually increased over five years.

However, mothers also reported less communication with their sons, making the case that increased conversations may lessen the negative impact of bullying on boys.

“Children who develop hostile and distrustful relationships with their parents due to low parental warmth and responsiveness may adopt similar patterns of negative expectations when engaging with peers, as a result of their greater fear and anxiety,” said Grace Yang, lead author of the study.

Researchers even speculated that boys’ behavior might improve with a stronger and supportive network of friends, versus girls who “depended on the parent and family dynamics.”

Caitlin St John is an Editorial Assistant for Parents.com who splits her time between New York City and her hometown on Long Island. She’s a self-proclaimed foodie who loves dancing and anything to do with her baby nephew. Follow her on Twitter: @CAITYstjohn

How to Identify Bullying
How to Identify Bullying
How to Identify Bullying

Image: Bullied boy via Shutterstock

Add a Comment

Bullying May Be Happening in Your Home

Thursday, February 19th, 2015

girl teasing boySibling rivalry is a common occurrence in many households, and altercations between a brother and a sister are not typically labeled as bullying.

But these conflicts are not something to be taken lightly, because aggressive sibling behavior is defined as sibling bullying. And new research confirms that bullying between siblings at home is actually more common than bullying between peers at school.

The new study, published in the Journal of Family Violence, surveyed approximately 400 undergraduate students about their childhood experiences. A checklist was used to determine which physical and verbal experiences fit into the category of bullying. The result: students expressed bullying behaviors among their siblings more often than among their peers.

“It’s understood that kids who are bulliers at school are sometimes being bullied at home, oftentimes by a sibling, though sometimes by a parent,” Dr. Gail Saltz, a New York psychiatrist, told NBC News.

And even more surprising, students who experienced sibling bullying were more likely to think it was normal childhood behavior and to downplay it. “And those who had been bullied by a sibling were less likely to report someone else being harassed to an authority figure,” reports NBC News.

Although the occasional sibling scuffle may not seem like something to stress over, the emotional and mental impact of sibling bullying on your child may be just as harsh as school bullying. So in order to combat instances that involve peer bullying, like cyberbullying, attitudes and behaviors at home must first be evaluated.

Caitlin St John is an Editorial Assistant for Parents.com who splits her time between New York City and her hometown on Long Island. She’s a self-proclaimed foodie who loves dancing and anything to do with her baby nephew. Follow her on Twitter: @CAITYstjohn

How to Identify Bullying
How to Identify Bullying
How to Identify Bullying

Image: Girl teasing boy via Shutterstock

Add a Comment

Should Schools Have Your Kid’s Facebook Password?

Tuesday, January 20th, 2015

SocialMediaIn an attempt to put an end to cyberbullying both during and after school hours, Illinois legislators recently passed a law that many parents believe is a breach of privacy.

Under the new law, school districts and universities are able to demand the password of a student’s social media account — especially “if school authorities have a reasonable cause to believe that a student’s account contains evidence that a student has violated a school’s disciplinary rule of policy, even if posted after school hours,” reports FOX News.

While this law’s intent is to send a strong, no-tolerance message about cyberbullying, some parents and students believe there are other, less intrusive solutions. For example, school authorities could obtain access to a social media account by having the student or parent sign into it for them.

According to BullyingStatistics.org, more than half of the nation’s teens have been a victim of cyberbullying, and about the same number have bullied someone else online. Because technology usage among children and teens is not slowing down, neither is cyberbullying. There are tips to stop cyberbullying, but the ongoing solution should involve a more collective effort between children, parents, and schools.

We want to know what you think! Do you think this law is an invasion of privacy? Do you think more states will follow Illinois’ lead? Let us know in the comments below.

Caitlin St John is an Editorial Assistant for Parents.com who splits her time between New York City and her hometown on Long Island. She’s a self-proclaimed foodie who loves dancing and anything to do with her baby nephew. Follow her on Twitter: @CAITYstjohn

How to Identify Bullying
How to Identify Bullying
How to Identify Bullying

Image: Social Media Apps via Shutterstock

Add a Comment

Bullying Linked to Inflammation, Other Health Issues

Wednesday, May 14th, 2014

Being bullied has been found in a new study to raise a protein level in the bloodstream that’s linked to both physical and mental health problems.  More from The New York Times:

Being bullied raises the blood’s level of C-reactive protein, or CRP, a marker of systemic inflammation and a risk factor for cardiovascular and other diseases.

Scientists followed 1,420 boys and girls ages 9 to 21, interviewing bullies, victims and their parents. They assessed CRP levels with periodic blood tests.

After controlling for initial levels of CRP and for many factors that affect it — sex, age, race and various health and socioeconomic issues — the researchers found that CRP levels in victims increased in direct proportion to the number of bullying incidents they experienced.

Bullies, in contrast, had low increases in CRP, even lower than those in children not involved in bullying at all. The finding suggested that a bully’s increased social status might have biological advantages, the scientists said. Their study was published online on Monday in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

“The only other kind of social adversity where we see this kind of long-term effect is in children who are physically abused or neglected,” said the lead author, William E. Copeland, an associate professor of psychiatry at Duke.

Back to School: Dealing With Meanness and Bullying
Back to School: Dealing With Meanness and Bullying
Back to School: Dealing With Meanness and Bullying

Image: Bullied boy, via Shutterstock

Add a Comment