Posts Tagged ‘ brat ban ’

Another Airline Creates Kid-Free Zones on its Planes

Monday, August 26th, 2013

The Singaporean airline Scoot is the latest company to ban children 12 and under from areas of its planes. Malaysia Airlines and AirAsia X previously established child-free sections on their planes, and it’s part of a larger, ongoing trend of businesses with “no kids allowed” policies.

Here’s more on Scoot’s child ban from ABC News:

For a $14 upgrade, Scoot passengers can sit within the “ScootinSilence” area, a 41-seat cabin prohibiting anyone under the age of 12 under. The child-free zone advertises itself under the auspice of ensured peace and quiet. It also offers additional legroom via Super or S-T-R-E-T-C-H seats, “offering 35″ pitch – “4 more inches than the standard economy seat,” according to the carrier’s website.

Scoot is not the first to kick kids out of certain areas. Malaysian Airlines has long denied children access to first class and introduced an adults-only section in economy in 2012. Meanwhile, AirAsia introduced a “Quiet Zone” to its aircrafts last year.

While offering child-free zones may seem extreme to some, it beats being bumped off a flight for tending to an unruly toddler. That’s what happened to a Rhode Island family flying back from Turks and Caicos last year on JetBlue. At the time, the airline said the decision had been made at the captain’s discretion after a prolonged period of disruption prior to takeoff.

The anti-kid trend is reflected in other areas of the hospitality industry, with an increasing number of restaurants banning children.

 

Readers, what do you think of child-free zones on airplanes?

Image: Toddler on plane, via Shutterstock

 

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Flying With Infants: Parents’ Tactic Ignites Debate

Tuesday, September 4th, 2012

Any parent who has tried to soothe a fussy baby at 30,000 feet knows that flying with little ones is no picnic. It’s even worse when your fellow passengers are less than understanding.

One couple tried an interesting strategy when flying recently with their 14-week-old twins: they passed out candy to everyone on the plane, along with a note explaining that this was the twins’ first flight, reports The Huffington Post’s Lisa Belkin. The note apologized in advance for any crying, and offered earplugs to anyone who needed them.

One passenger posted a photo of the treats on the website Reddit on Sunday with this description: “Brilliant and thoughtful parents handed these out to everyone on my flight.”

The photo sparked instant debate. Within a day, it had attracted more than 3,000 comments and had been viewed more than a million times. Some people praised the gesture and expressed sympathy for the parents, while others stated that babies just don’t belong on planes. Some complained about times that they’d had to sit next to babies who cried or had dirty diapers.

One commenter suggested that the candy was unnecessary. “Really? You don’t find this to be overkill?” papabusche said. “I don’t require an apology for a crying baby on a plane. This is to be expected. I’m ok with it. People have babies, and they need to travel too.”

The subject of children on planes has sparked intense discussion in recent years. Last summer, Malaysia Airline banned babies under age 2 from the first class cabins of its Boeing 747-400 and Airbus A380 superjumbo jets.

Readers, what do you think? Were the treats a smart move, or overkill?

Image: Candy from babies via gigantomachy / Reddit.

 

 

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‘No Kids Allowed’ Policies Spark Debate

Friday, October 14th, 2011

The growing number of businesses that are placing what has been termed a “brat ban” on children is sparking a debate among parents, consumers, and business owners.

A Chicago Tribune editorial explains the debate, and advises a balanced approach to thinking about how kids fit best into the larger world of commerce, travel, and dining:

The no-kids-allowed movement, aka the Brat Ban, is gaining momentum, driven by quiet-seeking adults who want to prohibit children from everything from concerts to public transportation to Facebook. Demographics tell the story: The U.S. has more empty-nesters and more childless couples than ever before. One in five women choose not to have children.

We understand why adults who want to enjoy a quiet restaurant meal object to parents who drop the leash and order a cocktail while their kids run screaming about the place. We understand about that cocktail, too.

So we’re happy to see the growing list of options for the child-averse: Adult swim. Theaters that have separate kids and no-kids screenings of the same movie. Quiet cars on the train. And yes, kid-free restaurants.

Some Whole Foods stores have child-free shopping hours, with activities to keep the kids busy while the grown-ups forage for cage-free eggs. For a real getaway, there’s leavethembehind.com, a website that specializes in kid-free vacation destinations.

But sometimes there’s no escape. On airplanes, for example. Every parent who’s ever checked a stroller on the jetway has seen the looks of consternation from fellow passengers, even before the baby has made a peep. “Find a more child-friendly mode of travel,” one air traveler sniffed on the Shine post. Selfish, whiny, immature — no, we’re not talking about the baby.

Frequent-flying moms have learned to carry big packages of foam earplugs to share with seatmates; if the airlines were smart, they’d stock up, too. Individual passengers would be wise to bring their own, if they can’t bear the sound of wailing.

(image via: http://blogs.brighthorizons.com/)

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