Posts Tagged ‘ blogging ’

Girl Shot by Taliban Reportedly Able to Stand

Monday, October 22nd, 2012

Malala Yousafzai, the 15-year-old Pakistani blogger who was shot in the head by the Taliban outside her school earlier this month, is making strides toward recovery, apparently able to stand and communicate after undergoing surgery and rehabilitation.  MSNBC reports:

Dr. Dave Rosser, medical director at the hospital, said that the girl was “well enough that she’s agreed that she’s happy, in fact keen, for us to share more clinical detail.”

Rosser said the infection was probably related to the track of a bullet which grazed her head when she was attacked. Because of the infection, Rosser said, “she is not out of the woods yet.”

Yousufzai began standing up to the Taliban when she was 11, when the Islamabad government had effectively ceded control of the Swat Valley, where she lives, to the militants.

Image: Heart monitor, via Shutterstock

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Teenaged Blogger Shot by Taliban in Pakistan

Thursday, October 11th, 2012

A 14-year-old Pakistani girl had surgery Tuesday night after she was shot by the Taliban, reportedly for writing blog posts that are critical of life in her home the war-torn Swat Valley.  According to MSNBC.com, Malala Yousafzai was shot in the head by Taliban militants who assaulted her at her school.  As of Wednesday, Yousafzai was in critical condition after undergoing surgery to remove the bullet from her body, where it was causing dangerous swelling in her brain and neck.

Yousafzai has been blogging since age 11, and last year she was nominated for an International Children’s Peace Prize for her work.  She has won a National Peace Prize in Pakistan, and she had a school named after her.

From NBC News:

In her blog, Malala chronicled life in the Swat Valley under the brutal and oppressive rule of the local faction of the Pakistani Taliban, who carried out public floggings, hung dead bodies in the streets, and banned education for girls.

In early 2011, the militants had added Malala to their hit list.

Nosheen Abbas, of BBC Urdu, told NBC News that Malala was “very passionate about education, and she spoke about that a lot to me.”

“It angered her deeply when girls’ schools were closed, and she was affected, and her class fellows were affected. She would talk about (hiding school bags),” she said.

“She was so open about what they were doing to her city, and she was so vocal about it — that is what made her so threatening,” she added.

Abbas tried to explain why the Taliban had reacted so strongly.

“When it’s coming from a child, it’s innocent, it’s honest, it’s open, and I think that’s what was so threatening,” she said of the blog.

“I think that code of honor that used to exist where women and children, they weren’t attacked, they were honored in a way never touched. I think that no longer exists, I think that is what it shows,” she added.

Image: Child’s hands on computer keyboard, via Shutterstock

 

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Study: Blogging Helps New Mothers Cope with Stress

Thursday, June 21st, 2012

A new study has found that new mothers who either read or write blogs report feeling less lonely, isolated, and stressed than mothers who don’t.  The study, performed by researchers at Penn State University and Brigham Young University, found that the emotional support mothers get from blogging benefits them in many areas of life.

“It looks like blogging might be helping these women as they transition into motherhood because they may begin to feel more connected to their extended family and friends, which leads them to feel more supported,” said Brandon T. McDaniel, graduate student in human development and family studies at Penn State in a statement “That potentially is going to spill out into other aspects of their well being, including their marital relationship with their partner, the ways that they’re feeling about their parenting stress, and eventually into their levels of depression.”

Social networking, including Facebook, did not appear to have the same benefits as blogging, the study found.  And blogging, though, helpful, was not an antidote to the stress of new motherhood.

“We’re not saying that those who end up feeling more supported all of a sudden no longer have stresses, they’re still going to have those stressful moments you have as a parent,” said McDaniel. “But because they’re feeling more supported, their thoughts and their feelings about that stress might change, and they begin to feel less stressed about those things.”

Image: Woman at a computer, via Shutterstock.

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