Posts Tagged ‘ birth rate ’

U.S. Birth Rate Reaches Historic Low

Friday, January 24th, 2014

The overall U.S. birth rate has dropped by more than 10 percent since 2008, placing it at an historic low of 3.8 million children born in 2011, according to federal statistics released by the Agency for Health Research and Quality.  More from CNN.com:

Lots of data shows the U.S. birth rate is headed downwards, and some link this with the economic recession. The birth rate among teenagers has reached new historic lows every year for the past five years

And overall U.S. births have fallen steadily since hitting all-time high of more than 4.3 million in 2007.

The AHRQ also breaks down how much it costs to give birth and who pays for it. Most births are covered by private health insurance, but a growing number are paid for by Medicaid, the joint state-federal health insurance plan for the low income.

“In 2008, Medicaid covered 40.5 percent of hospital stays for newborns, which increased to 44.7 percent in 2011,” the report reads.

“On average, newborns stayed in the hospital for 3.4 days and incurred average hospital costs of $3,200,” it adds. But premature babies stayed on average 14 days and their care cost $21,500.

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U.S. Hispanic Pregnancy Rate Falls, Reflecting Changing Attitudes

Wednesday, January 2nd, 2013

As a growing number of Hispanic families choose to have fewer children, the rate of babies born to Hispanic and Latina woman has declined shortly in recent years, a new report from the Pew Research Center has found.  The New York Times has more:

Both immigrant and native-born Latinas had steeper birthrate declines from 2007 to 2010 than other groups, including non-Hispanic whites, blacks and Asians, a drop some demographers and sociologists attribute to changes in the views of many Hispanic women about motherhood.

As a result, in 2011, the American birthrate hit a record low, with 63 births per 1,000 women ages 15 to 44, led by the decline in births to immigrant women. The national birthrate is now about half what it was during the baby boom years, when it peaked in 1957 at 122.7 births per 1,000 women of childbearing age.

The decline in birthrates was steepest among Mexican-American women and women who immigrated from Mexico, at 25.7 percent. This has reversed a trend in which immigrant mothers accounted for a rising share of births in the United States, according to a recent report by the Pew Research Center. In 2010, birthrates among all Hispanics reached their lowest level in 20 years, the center found.

The sudden drop-off, which coincided with the onset of the recession, suggests that attitudes have changed since the days when older generations of Latinos prized large families and more closely followed Roman Catholic teachings, which forbid artificial contraception.

Image: Hispanic mother and children, via Shutterstock

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U.S. Birth Rate Hits Record Low

Friday, November 30th, 2012

The rate of American births dropped in 2011 to a record low, hitting 63.2 births per 1,000 women, a new report from the Pew Research Center using statistics from the National Center for Health Statistics. More from LiveScience:

“That’s the lowest since such reliable record collection began in 1920 and close to half the birth rate in 1957, amid the Baby Boom years.

The overall number of births declined 7 percent from 2007 to 2010. During this period, U.S.-born women saw a 5 percent birth-rate decline, while there was a 13 percent drop in births to immigrants. The drop was even more dramatic for Mexican immigrant women, at 23 percent.

Despite the recent dip, foreign-born mothers still give birth to a disproportionate share of the nation’s newborns, a trend that has persisted over the past two decades. The birth rate for immigrant women in 2010 was 87.8 per 1,000 births, compared with 58.9 per 1,000 births for American-born women. And although only 13 percent of the U.S. population was foreign-born in 2010, immigrant births accounted for 23 percent of all newborns that year, according to the Pew Research Center.”

Image: Pregnant woman, via Shutterstock

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U.S. Birth Rate Down for 4th Consecutive Year

Thursday, October 4th, 2012

The number of children born in the U.S. declined in 2011 for the 4th year in a row, though last year’s drop was only 1 percent over 2010′s birth rate, a government research organization is reporting.  From The Associated Press:

The decline in 2011 was just 1 percent — not as sharp a fall-off as the 2 to 3 percent drop seen in other recent years.

“It may be that the effect of the recession is slowly coming to an end,” said Carl Haub, a senior demographer with the Population Reference Bureau, a Washington, D.C.-based research organization.

Most striking in the new report were steep declines in Hispanic birth rates and a new low in teen births. Hispanics have been disproportionately affected by the flagging economy, experts say, and teen birth rates have been falling for 20 years.

Falling births is a relatively new phenomenon in this country. Births had been on the rise since the late 1990s and hit an all-time high of more than 4.3 million in 2007.

But fewer than 4 million births were counted last year — the lowest number since 1998.

Image: Mother and baby, via Shutterstock.

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