Posts Tagged ‘ antibiotics ’

African American Kids Less Likely to Get Antibiotics

Thursday, March 21st, 2013

Black children are less likely than kids of other races to receive prescriptions for antibiotics when they visit the doctor, according to a study published this week in the journal Pediatrics.  More from the blog The Grio:

The findings are based on 1.3 million doctor visits with the same 222 providers, and were independent of age, gender or type of insurance.

This is not the first time research has shown racial biases among health professionals. A smaller study at the University of Washington, showed that unconscious racial biases affected the amount of pain medication given to black children when they needed it. And a Johns Hopkins study highlighted that primary physicians with unconscious racial biases tended to dominate conversations with black patients, ignore their social needs and exclude them from the decision-making process.

However, today’s study is one of the few to look at its effects on respiratory infections and antibiotic use in children.

“Our goal has always been to find ways to improve antibiotic prescribing for children,” says study author Dr. Jeffrey S. Gerber, who is also assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine’s Division of Infectious Diseases.

“These analyses [then] revealed the differences in prescribing by race.”

Although, what this study has uncovered may not be a negative. In the age of antibiotic overprescribing and the fear that unnecessary antibiotics later lead to “superbugs” that are too strong to treat, this may in fact be a good thing.

“Overprescribing of antibiotics to children with [respiratory tract infections] is common,” Gerber says.

Image: Child at the doctor, via Shutterstock

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Antibiotics Could Save Thousands of Malnourished Children

Friday, February 1st, 2013

An inexpensive course of antibiotics, when given in conjunction with long-used nutritional treatments, could save tens of thousands of children’s lives each year, two new studies have concluded.  More from The New York Times:

The studies, in Malawi, led by scientists from Washington University in St. Louis, reveal that severe malnutrition often involves more than a lack of food, and that feeding alone may not cure it.

The antibiotic study found that a week of the medicine raised survival and recovery rates when given at the start of a longer course of a tasty “therapeutic food” made from peanut butter fortified with milk powder, oil, sugar and micronutrients. Malnourished children are prone to infections, and the drugs — either amoxicillin or cefdinir — were so helpful that researchers said medical practice should change immediately to include an antibiotic in the routine treatment of severe malnutrition.

“This is ready for prime time,” said Dr. Indi Trehan, an author of the study. The study was published Wednesday in The New England Journal of Medicine. The senior author is Dr. Mark J. Manary, an expert on malnutrition and one of the pioneers in using the fortified peanut butter, which researchers say has saved countless lives.

Because of the results, the World Health Organization expects to recommend broader use of antibiotics in guidelines on treating malnutrition that are to be issued next month, said Zita Weise Prinzo, a technical officer in the group’s nutrition department. A week’s worth of drugs costs only a few dollars, so governments and donors are likely to accept the idea, researchers say.

Image: Empty hands, via Shutterstock

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Antibiotics for Babies Linked to Childhood Obesity

Wednesday, August 22nd, 2012

Babies who are given antibiotics before six months of age are at greater risk of being overweight children, a new study has found.  Yahoo News reports:

“We typically consider obesity an epidemic grounded in unhealthy diet and exercise, yet increasingly studies suggest it’s more complicated,” said co-author Leonardo Trasande of the New York University School of Medicine.

“Microbes in our intestines may play critical roles in how we absorb calories, and exposure to antibiotics, especially early in life, may kill off healthy bacteria that influence how we absorb nutrients into our bodies, and would otherwise keep us lean.”

The study adds to a growing body of research warning of the potential dangers of antibiotics, especially for children.

Preliminary studies have linked changes in the trillions of microbial cells in our bodies to obesity, inflammatory bowel disease, asthma and other conditions. However, direct causal proof has not yet been found.

This was the first study analyzing the relationship between antibiotic use and body mass starting in infancy.

Image: Cute baby, via Shutterstock

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Medical Mystery Determined to Be Lego Up Child’s Nose

Friday, August 10th, 2012

The cause of chronic sinus problems that a 6-year-old Utah boy has been suffering for 3 years has finally been identified to both the relief and surprise of his family and doctors:  Isaak Lasson had a flexible Lego wheel jammed up his nose.  MSNBC.com has more:

Despite numerous trips to the doctor, no one knew what was making it so hard for the poor kid to breathe. Over the years, Isaak was prescribed multiple rounds of antibiotics.

Then, in late July, one doctor took a good look and noticed something in that little nostril that didn’t belong. When the doctor asked him what it could be, KSL reported, Isaak said, “I put some spaghetti up there, but that was a long time ago.” A trip to a specialist finally revealed the culprit – a fairly large Lego piece wrapped in a wad of fungus. Yum.

Luckily, now that his airways are free and clear, Isaak’s not only breathing better, he’s also sleeping and eating better and has more energy. His parents feel bad about the whole thing — but how could they have known?

“I asked him, ‘Dude, how did that even get in there?’” Craig Lasson, Isaak’s dad, told the news station. “We think he bent it in half — it’s pretty flexible — and that it opened up once it got into his sinuses.”

Image: Colored building bricks, via Shutterstock

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Study: Fewer Antibiotics, More ADHD Drugs in Use Among Children

Friday, June 22nd, 2012

A new study has found that over the past decade, more medications for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are being prescribed to U.S. children and teenagers, while fewer antibiotics are being prescribed.  One-quarter of all prescriptions given to children are still for antibiotics, the study reports, but overall the number of antibiotics prescriptions has fallen 14 percent during the years 2002-2010.  Yahoo News reports on the study, which was published in the journal Pediatrics:

Overall, prescriptions for kids ages 0-17 dropped seven percent during that time period, while prescription drugs dispensed to adults rose 22 percent, it said.

“Children are experiencing fewer serious medical problems than perhaps they had in the past,” said Victor Fornari, director of child and adolescent psychiatry at North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System in New York.

The report tracked the number of prescriptions dispensed for the youths, not the number of patients, and was based on two major US commercial prescription databases.

A key rise was seen in stimulant medications for ADHD, which the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention describes as one of the most common neurobehavioral conditions of childhood, affecting about five million children.

Image: Toddler taking medicine, via Shutterstock

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