Posts Tagged ‘ American Academy of Pediatrics ’

Retail-Based Clinics Shouldn’t Be Primary Care Spots, Doctors Say

Tuesday, February 25th, 2014

The American Academy of Pediatrics has issued a policy statement urging parents not to use medical clinics at retail stores like CVS or Walgreens as their children’s primary care resource.  More from Reuters:

Retail medical clinics, first opened in the U.S. in 2000, have popped up in grocery stores, drug store chains and “big box” stores. There were more than 6,000 such locations in the country as of 2012, according to the policy update published in the journal Pediatrics.

Representatives from Walgreens and CVS, both national drugstore chains with associated medical clinics at some locations, largely agree with the AAP guidelines and do not encourage people to use their services as primary care.

“We strongly encourage all patients to have a relationship with a primary care physician and medical home for ongoing medical needs and routine exams,” Walgreens spokesman Jim Cohn told Reuters Health.

The statement only refers to the types of clinics that are built into other businesses, not freestanding “urgent care” clinics, which have also grown in popularity and have some of the same drawbacks.

According to the authors of the statement, taking kids to retail clinics instead of primary care pediatricians fragments care, since the kids don’t always see the same medical provider. A child could have chronic ear infections or other long-term medical problems that seem to the providers at various retail clinics like unrelated single events.

Image: Mom and child at pharmacy, via Shutterstock

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Pediatricians Advise Children, Pregnant Women to Avoid Raw Milk

Wednesday, December 18th, 2013

Raw milk–milk that has not been pasteurized–may carry serious health risks and should be avoided by pregnant women, infants and children, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is saying in a new policy statement.  More from The New York Times:

Although the sale of unpasteurized milk products is legal in 30 states, the academy says that the evidence of the benefits of pasteurization to food safety is overwhelming, and that the benefits of any elements in raw milk that are inactivated by pasteurization have not been scientifically demonstrated.

The report, published Monday in Pediatrics, notes that many species of harmful bacteria have been found in unpasteurized milk products, including Listeria, Salmonella, Escherichia coli and Cryptosporidium, among others.

In a study published last week in Emerging Infectious Diseases, researchers estimated that over the past 10 years in Minnesota, where raw milk is legally sold, more than 17 percent of those who consumed it became ill.

“There are no proven nutritional advantages of raw milk,” said a lead author, Dr. Jatinder Bhatia, the chief of neonatology at Georgia Regent University in Augusta. “Further, raw milk and milk products account for a significant proportion of food borne illnesses in Americans. There is no reason to risk consuming raw milk.”

The AAP also advises avoiding raw milk cheeses for the same reasons.

Image: Cow, via Shutterstock

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After Concussion, Kids Should Delay Return to School, AAP Advises

Tuesday, October 29th, 2013

The American Academy of Pediatrics is recommending that kids who suffer a concussion, a common sports-related injury, shouldn’t return to school right away, lest they exacerbate the temporary symptoms of concussion that relate to learning and retaining information.  More from Time.com:

Although children may appear to be physically normal after having a concussion, they may actually have trouble learning new information and retaining it. Going back to school may exacerbate these symptoms, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) in a new clinical report presented at the AAP National Conference & Exhibition in Orlando.

Research shows that it takes about three weeks for a child to fully recover from a concussion. If their symptoms are especially severe, they should stay home from school. Even though kids with concussions may appear asymptomatic, they often report difficulty focusing on schoolwork and taking tests, especially in math, science, and foreign-languages. Medical experts are worried that too much learning stimulation can overwhelm a brain that is still recovering, and make it even more difficult for a child to get back on track. If systems are mild, parents can consider sending their kids back to class, but should inform teachers about the concussion so adjustments can be made to the pace of the class if needed. The researchers call this necessary step, “cognitive rest.”
New guidelines were issued this year by the American Academy of Neurology recommending that kids and teens who suffer concussions should sit out at sports practices and games until they have been cleared by a medical professional.
Image: Boy in football uniform, via Shutterstock
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Bed-Sharing on the Rise Despite Warnings

Wednesday, October 2nd, 2013

A growing number of families are bed-sharing, or having their infants and young children sleep in bed with their parents, despite warnings from health experts that the practice increases the chances that a baby could die of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), suffocation, or entanglement.  A new government-funded study shows that bed-sharing has doubled over the past 17 years. More from USA Today:

The increase was most notable among African-American infants, according to the study reported Monday in the journal JAMA Pediatrics.

Overall, the percentage of nighttime caregivers who reported that an infant usually shared a bed rose from 7% in 1993 to 14% in 2010. Among black infants the proportion increased from 21% to 39%. Among white infants, it rose from 5% to 9%. Among Hispanic infants, it rose from 13% to 21%.

“The disparity in nighttime habits has increased in recent years,” said lead author Eve Colson of the Yale University School of Medicine in a statement. “Because African-American infants are already at increased risk for SIDS, this trend is a cause for concern.”

Advice from physicians could significantly reduce infant bed-sharing, also known as co-sleeping, for all families, finds the survey of nearly 20,000 caregivers conducted by researchers with the National Institutes of Health and others. Caregivers who perceived physicians’ attitude as against sharing a bed were about 34% less likely to report that the infant usually shared a bed than were caregivers who received no advice.

To reduce the risk of SIDS and other sleep-related dangers, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends placing babies to sleep in the same room as the caregiver, but not in the same bed.

Image: Bed-sharing family, via Shutterstock

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Pediatricians: Now’s the Time for Flu Shots

Wednesday, September 4th, 2013

Flu season may still feel far away as summer-like temperatures are still felt over much of the country.  But the American Academy of Pediatrics issued an advisory this week urging parents to get their children–and themselves–immunized against the flu as soon as possible to achieve the maximum protection when the season begins in earnest.  More from NBC News:

There are some new vaccines on the market and while some of the newer ones might appear better, it’s not worth waiting for one, the American Academy of Pediatrics said in an advisory.

“With the exception of children less than 6 months of age, everybody should go out and get their influenza vaccine as soon as the influenza vaccines are available,” Dr. Michael Brady of Nationwide Children’s Hospital and chairman of the Committee on Infectious Diseases for the Academy told NBC News.

“Parents should not delay vaccinating their children to obtain a specific vaccine,” added pediatrician Dr. Henry Bernstein of the Hofstra North Shore – Long Island Jewish Health System in New York, who led the team writing the recommendations.

“Influenza virus is unpredictable, and what’s most important is that people receive the vaccine soon, so that they will be protected when the virus begins circulating.”

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that anywhere between 3,000 to 49,000 people a year die from flu in the United States, and up to 200,000 are sick enough to be hospitalized. A lot depends on the strains circulating. During last year’s flu season, 160 children died from flu.

Image: Child getting a shot, via Shutterstock

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