Posts Tagged ‘ adult ’

Childhood Self-Control May Lead to Better Jobs Later in Life

Wednesday, April 15th, 2015

Self-controlParents who teach their children to be in control of their emotions, desires, and behavior may be setting their children up for a more successful life.

A new study published in the journal Psychological Science has now found a link between children with stronger self-control and higher-quality job prospects as adults. Children with self-control pay closer attention, prevail through tedious tasks, and shy away from impulsive behavior.

“While a link between adults’ self-control and immediate job success might seem obvious, it wasn’t clear whether measures of childhood self-control could forecast who successfully enters the workforce and avoids spells of unemployment across adult life,” notes Science Daily. A few years ago, another study also found a correlation between childhood self-control and fewer bad judgments during the teen years.

Related: How to Raise a Determined Child

Researchers used data from two previous studies of more than 15,000 children. They learned that children who displayed characteristics of self-control spent 40 percent less time unemployed than those who showed few signs of self-control—and this was especially true during times of recession and economic hardship.

A variety of factors can explain why those without self-control may have fewer job prospects and longer unemployment, such as inability to deal with stress, frequent job interruptions, and bad habits and lifestyle choices (poor time management and inconsistent sleep patterns).

Self-control can be developed in a number of ways. School programs, preschool interventions, meditation, and physical activities like yoga can all improve children’s control of themselves, says lead researcher Michael Daly.

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Caitlin St John is an Editorial Assistant for Parents.com who splits her time between New York City and her hometown on Long Island. She’s a self-proclaimed foodie who loves dancing and anything to do with her baby nephew. Follow her on Twitter: @CAITYstjohn

Parenting Style: Positive Parenting
Parenting Style: Positive Parenting
Parenting Style: Positive Parenting

Image: Self-control via Shutterstock

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Why Breastfeeding Your Baby Longer Could Mean a Higher IQ

Wednesday, March 18th, 2015

Mother breastfeedingBreastfeeding is a difficult task for many mothers but, according to new research, prolonged nursing can help your child reap certain benefits in adulthood.

A study published in the Lancet Global Health journal concluded that a “longer duration of breastfeeding is linked with increased intelligence in adulthood, longer schooling, and higher adult earnings,” reports Science Daily.

Researchers followed nearly 3,500 newborns for 30 years and were able to establish that prolonged breastfeeding had a positive long-term effect on the individuals later in life. The most notable increase in good outcomes was connected to babies who had been breastfed for at least 12 months. As adults, they scored four points higher on IQ tests, attended school for a year longer, and made 15 percent more money, according to Time.

“The likely mechanism underlying the beneficial effects of breast milk on intelligence is the presence of long-chain saturated fatty acids (DHAs) found in breast milk, which are essential for brain development,” said Dr. Bernardo Lessa Horta, the study’s lead author. “Our finding that predominant breastfeeding is positively related to IQ in adulthood also suggests that the amount of milk consumed plays a role.”

All this makes the case that extended breastfeeding can have a good impact on a child’s development.

Caitlin St John is an Editorial Assistant for Parents.com who splits her time between New York City and her hometown on Long Island. She’s a self-proclaimed foodie who loves dancing and anything to do with her baby nephew. Follow her on Twitter: @CAITYstjohn

How to Manage Breastfeeding
How to Manage Breastfeeding
How to Manage Breastfeeding

Image: Mother breastfeeding via Shutterstock

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Sensitive Caregiving Can Make Your Child a Successful Adult

Tuesday, January 6th, 2015

Mother and daughter paintingIt’s no secret that interactions between a parent and child are essential for growth and development, but just how important is a sensitive approach?

According to a new study, parents should strongly focus on sensitive caregiving during the first three years of their child’s life. The study’s findings, which appear in the journal Child Development, correlate sensitive caregiving with an individual’s long-term social and academic success. Researchers define sensitive caregiving as, “the extent to which a parent responds to a child’s signals appropriately and promptly, is positively involved during interactions with the child, and provides a secure base for the child’s exploration of the environment,” reports Science Daily.

For the study 243 mothers in their third trimester were recruited. All the mothers were living below the poverty line and represented various ethnic backgrounds and races. The mothers and their children were observed four times within each child’s first three years and then multiple times until the child reached age 32. During childhood and adolescence, teachers also assessed the children’s social interactions with their peers and administered standardized tests to evaluate academic performance. Once the kids reached their 20s and early 30s, researchers conducted interviews to evaluate their romantic relationships and educational achievements.

Results showed that children who received attentive, sensitive caregiving were consistently more successful, both academically and socially, than those who did not. These children also received higher test scores throughout their adolescence. As adults, they achieved higher levels of education and had greater success rates with intimate relationships. However, there was a more substantial impact on the individuals’ academic accomplishments than how well they functioned socially.

“Altogether, the study suggests that children’s experiences with parents during the first few years of life have a unique role in promoting social and academic functioning–not merely during the first two decades of life, but also during adulthood,” says Lee Raby, co-author of the study. Uninterested or hostile parenting not only have a negative impact on kids immediately, but it continues to affect them through every stage of their lives. Although Raby’s study observed children who were born into poverty, he believes that the results would be the same if  financially secure families were involved, notes The Huffington Post.

For Raby, the next step in the research is to determine if moms with access to parental support programs during the first few years of their kids’ childhood will have a positive impact on their adulthood. But based on the current study, parents should continue to nurture their children, be conscientious to their needs, and acknowledge their achievement with praises.

Caitlin St John is an Editorial Assistant for Parents.com who splits her time between New York City and her hometown on Long Island. She’s a self-proclaimed foodie who loves dancing and anything to do with her baby nephew. Follow her on Twitter: @CAITYstjohn

Parenting Style: Positive Parenting
Parenting Style: Positive Parenting
Parenting Style: Positive Parenting

Image: Mother and daughter painting via Shutterstock

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Genetic Test for Asthma Risk

Monday, July 1st, 2013

child with asthma inhalerA new genetic test may be able to predict a child’s risk of having asthma that lasts into adulthood. With the cost of medical treatment for asthma and it’s complications adding up to around $56 billion each year according to a survey from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), this test could help doctors determine which children need intensive childhood care to potentially lower their risk of long-term symptoms. More from Time.com:

This new study, published in the journal Lancet Respiratory Medicine, uses fifteen specific, isolated genetic markers that are thought to be associated with the physical symptoms of the disease to develop what is called a genetic risk score. Over the course of the 40-year study of 880 participants conducted by researchers at Duke University, those with higher genetic scores were more likely to miss school or work or be hospitalized due to their asthma-related symptoms than those with lower scores. Based on a 38 year follow-up, those with higher scores also were more likely to have symptoms as adults.

Physicians currently use a patient’s family history of asthma to help determine the patient’s risk of the disease. However, since he genetic markers used to develop a person’s genetic risk score do not take into account this family history of the disease, this research may mean that doctors need to rethink how they evaluate asthma risk factors in their patients.

Image: Child with asthma inhaler, via Shutterstock

 

 

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