Posts Tagged ‘ abdominal pain ’

Baby Born Healthy After Rare Abdomen Pregnancy

Friday, March 14th, 2014

A baby girl was born in Tanzania after her mother experienced an abdominal pregnancy–a rare form of ectopic pregnancy.  LiveScience has more:

When doctors examined the woman further and discovered the abdominal pregnancy, they quickly operated on the woman’s abdomen and found her live fetus floating in her abdominal cavity, without its nourishing amniotic sac. The healthy baby girl was delivered and sent home with her 22-year-old mother in good condition, researchers in Tanzania said.

Abdominal pregnancies are rare, and when they do happen, they can go unnoticed even if ultrasounds are used, because the pregnancy can appear normal in an ultrasound examination, the researchers wrote in the report, published Feb. 25 in the journal BioMed Central. An abdominal pregnancy that goes unnoticed can threaten the mother’s life and cause massive bleeding.

“I’ve seen maybe four or five abdominal pregnancies over the course of 25 years,” said Dr. Jill Rabin, chief of ambulatory care, obstetrics and gynecology at Long Island Jewish Medical Center in New Hyde Park, N.Y., who wasn’t involved with the case.

“Many times, these pregnancies are not diagnosed until the labor,” Rabin said. “The woman is going through labor, the cervix is dilated and you are wondering, ‘Why is the patient having contractions and nothing is happening?’”

Abdominal pregnancy is a rare form of ectopic pregnancy, occurring in about 1 out of every 10,000 pregnancies, according to some estimates. In an abdominal pregnancy, an embryo usually first implants in one of the fallopian tubes (instead of the uterus), and then moves backward within the body, toward the ovaries. From there, it implants for the second time — this time, in the abdomen.

Diagnosing an abdominal pregnancy is difficult, Rabin said. “It’s very rare, but you have to keep it in your mind when examining a pregnant woman who has abdominal pain.”

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Kids’ Stomach Pain, Anxiety Disorders Linked

Tuesday, August 13th, 2013

Chronic stomach pain suffered by children but without medical explanation may be an indication of an anxiety disorder, according to new research published in the journal Pedaitrics.  More from Reuters:

By the time kids with stomach pain reached age 20, just over half had had symptoms of an anxiety disorder at some point, most often social anxiety, researchers found.

Anxiety tended to start in early childhood, around the same time as the chronic stomach problems.

Past studies suggest between eight and 25 percent of all youth have chronic stomach pain, researchers noted. When there’s no clear medical cause for the pain – such as inflammatory bowel disease or celiac disease – it’s known as functional abdominal pain.

“It’s very prevalent, and it’s one of the most common reasons that children and adolescents end up in their pediatrician’s office. It’s one of the most common reasons kids are missing school,” said Dr. Eva Szigethy, head of the Medical Coping Clinic at the Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center.

One small study of children with that type of pain found they were at a higher than average risk of anxiety disorders as young adults.

To build on those findings, Lynn Walker from the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, Tennessee, and her colleagues followed 332 children who visited a doctor for unexplained stomach pain between age eight and 17.

For comparison, they also tracked 147 youth from the same area schools without stomach problems.

When participants were 20 years old, on average, the researchers interviewed them in person or over the phone about symptoms of anxiety and depression. At that point, four in 10 of those with a history of stomach pain still had a gastrointestinal disorder.

Based on the interviews, Walker’s team found 51 percent of people with stomach pain as children had ever had an anxiety disorder and 30 percent currently met the criteria for a diagnosis.

In comparison, 20 percent of people in the no-stomach pain group had ever had an anxiety disorder and 12 percent currently had one.

“What was striking was the extent to which anxiety disorders were still present at follow-up,” Walker told Reuters Health.

Image: Boy having stomach pain, via Shutterstock

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