Archive for the ‘ Product Recalls ’ Category

The Biggest Toy, Clothing, and Gear Recalls of 2014

Tuesday, December 9th, 2014

Millions of products were recalled this year, so it is important to stay on top of what your family owns. Learn about the biggest recalls of 2014 that directly affect babies and children. This year, car seats made up nearly half of our top 10 list, which also includes mass-market items such as a McDonald’s Happy Meal toy and a popular Walmart doll.  If you have any one of these products, be sure to click on the link provided and follow the guidelines for return or repair. Sign up for our recall newsletter so you are alerted when something is recalled that could affect your family.

Combi10. Combi Child Restraints

Date: January 3, 2014

Company/Brand: Combi USA, Inc.

The danger: The harness webbing fails to meet minimum breaking strength requirements. In the event of a crash, a child may not be remain adequately secured, increasing the risk of injury.

Sold at: Nationwide

H&M leggings9. H&M Girls’ Leggings

Date: May 15, 2014

Company/Brand: H&M Hennes & Mauritz L.P.

The danger: A metal part on the belt can detach, posing a choking hazard to young children. There has been one report of a choking incident in the United Kingdom, but no reports of consumer incidents or injuries related to the use of these products in the U.S.

Sold at: H&M stores nationwide and online at HM.com from August 2012 to April 2014 for between $3 and $15.

Vera Bradley Rattle8. Vera Bradley Bear Ring Rattles and Bunny Toys 

Date: March 19, 2014

Company/Brand: Vera Bradley Designs Inc.

The danger: The pom-pom tail can detach from the body of the bear rattle and the bunny, posing a choking hazard to young children. Vera Bradley has received two reports that the pom-pom tail detached from the product. No injuries have been reported.

Sold at: Nationwide from September 2012 to January 2014.

Walmart Doll recall7. My Sweet Love/My Sweet Baby Cuddle Care Baby Doll

Date: March 25, 2014

Company/Brand: Tak Ngai Electronic Toys Co., LTD

The danger: The circuit board in the chest of the doll can overheat, causing the surface of the doll to get hot, posing a burn hazard to the consumer. Walmart has received 12 reports of incidents, including two reports of burns or blisters to the thumb.

Sold at: Walmart stores nationwide from August 2012 through March 2014 for $20.

Brita Water Bottles6. Brita Children’s Water Bottle 

Date: August 19, 2014

Company/Brand: BRITA LP of Oakland, Calif.

The danger: The lid can break into pieces with sharp points, posing a laceration hazard. There have been 35 reports of lids breaking or cracking. No injuries have been reported.

Sold at: Alaska Housewares, Associated Food Stores, Bartell Drug, C&S Wholesale Grocers, Quidsi, Royal Ahold, Shopko, Target, US Navy Exchange, Walmart Stores, and online at Amazon.com, Drugstore.com and Target.com. Hello Kitty bottles were sold from February 2014 through July 2014. Dora the Explorer, SpongeBob Square Pants and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles bottles were sold from June 2013 through July 2014. The bottles sold for about $13 to $19.

Evenflo booster seat5. Evenflo Child Seat Buckles 

Date: April 4, 2014

Company/Brand: Evenflo Company

The danger: The buckle may become stuck in a latched position, making it difficult to remove a child from the seat. This could prove critical to a child’s safety in the case of an emergency. No injuries have been reported.

Sold at: Nationwide.

Graco Snug Ride recall4. Graco Rear-Facing Child Restraints

Date: June 30, 2014

Company/Brand: Graco Children’s Products

The danger: The defect involves difficulty in unlatching the harness buckle. In some cases, the buckle becomes stuck in a latched condition so that it cannot be opened by depressing the buckle’s release button. It may be difficult to remove the child from the restraint, increasing the risk of injury in the event of a vehicle crash, fire, or other emergency, in which a prompt exit from the vehicle is required.

Sold at: Nationwide.

Hello Kitty Whistle3. Hello Kitty Birthday Lollipop Whistles 

Date: November 10, 2014

Company/Brand: McDonald’s Corp., of Oakbrook, Ill.

The danger: Components inside of the whistle can detach, posing choking and aspiration hazards to young children. McDonald’s has received two reports of children who coughed out pieces of the whistle that they had sucked into their mouths, including one child who received medical attention.

Sold at: McDonald’s restaurants nationwide from October 2014 through the first week of November 2014 with Happy Meals and Mighty Kids Meals.

Graco logo2. Graco Toddler and Booster Child Restraints

Date: February 10, 2014

Company/Brand: Graco Children’s Products 

The danger: There has been difficulty in unlatching the harness buckle. In some cases, the buckle becomes stuck in a latched condition so that it cannot be opened by depressing the buckle’s release button. It may be difficult to remove the child from the restraint, increasing the risk of injury in the event of a vehicle crash, fire, or other emergency, in which a prompt exit from the vehicle is required. There have been no injuries reported.

Sold at: Nationwide.

Graco stroller1. Graco Strollers 

Date: November 20, 2014

Company/Brand: Graco Children’s Products

The danger: The folding hinge on the sides of the stroller can pinch a child’s finger, posing a laceration or amputation hazard. Graco has received 11 reports of finger injuries including six reports of fingertip amputation, four reports of partial-fingertip amputation and one finger laceration.

Sold at: Target, Toys R Us, Walmart and other retail stores nationwide and online at Amazon.com, Walmart.com and other online retailers for about $40-70 for the stroller and about $140-170 for the Travel System

Product Recalls: What to Do
Product Recalls: What to Do
Product Recalls: What to Do

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Feds: Stop Using Nap Nanny Recliners

Wednesday, June 4th, 2014

Federal officials are urging parents to stop using “Nap Nanny” infant recliners in the wake of the suffocation death of an 8-month-old New Jersey girl.  The baby’s death was the sixth fatality linked to the recliner, and the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is warning parents to throw away Nap Nanny recliners they may already own, and to avoid buying used recliners at yard sales or online auctions.  More from ABC News:

CPSC Communications Director Scott Wolfson said parents should avoid the recliners at yard sales, as hand-me-downs or in online auctions.

“Our message to parents is clear: Stop using it. It’s dangerous,” Wolfson said. “There’s been six deaths already, and we don’t want another child to die unnecessarily.”

About 165,000 Nap Nanny and Nap Nanny Chill recliners were sold between 2009 and 2012. Nap Nannies — which are no longer sold in stores — were recalled last year, but for months the company that made the portable recliner refused to pull it from shelves or offer refunds, instead insisting on the product’s safety when used properly.

In a statement, an official with the company, now out of business for two years, told ABC News it was heartbroken for the families who have lost a child, but said the Nap Nanny was never intended for use in a crib.

The CPSC sued Baby Matters, LLC, the company that manufactured Nap Nanny, in 2012, and later that year, before the company went out of business, a number of major retailers, including Amazon.com and Toys R Us, stopped selling the products.

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Highchair-Related Injuries Spike; 9,400 Kids Hurt Each Year

Tuesday, December 10th, 2013

More than 9,400 children are treated each year in U.S. emergency rooms after suffering injuries in their highchairs, most often from falling out of poorly secured chairs, according to a new study published by the Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. The numbers represent a significant rise in the number of highchair-related injuries–a 22 percent jump between the years 2003 and 2010.  More from US News:

Despite the fact that millions of defective highchairs have been recalled in recent years, researchers at the hospital’s Center for Injury Research and Policy found that the number of children under the age of 3 who were treated in emergency departments between 2003 and 2010 increased by 22 percent. On average, one child each hour was treated for such an injury, according to the study, published in the journal Clinical Pediatrics.

“Families may not think about the dangers associated with the use of high chairs,” said Gary Smith, director of the Center for Injury Research, in a statement. “High chairs are typically used in kitchens and dining areas, so when a child falls from the elevated height of the high chair, he is often falling head first onto a hard surface such as tile or wood flooring with considerable force.

Most often, the children seen were treated for closed head injuries, which include concussions and internal head injuries. More than one-third of the children injured (37 percent) were treated for closed head injuries.

Not only were closed head injuries the most common injury associated with highchairs, but they were also the type that saw the greatest increase between 2003 and 2010 – up nearly 90 percent, from 2,558 in 2003 to 4,789 in 2010.

Additionally, 33 percent were treated for bumps and bruises, and 19 percent were treated for cuts associated with falls from highchairs. Overall, 93 percent of the injuries involved a fall from a highchair or booster seat.

When information was available for what children were doing just before a fall from a highchair or booster seat, two-thirds of them were climbing or standing in the chair, which suggests that the chair’s safety restraints were either not being used or were ineffective.

Parents are urged to make sure their children are properly strapped into their high chairs and booster seats. If you are concerned about the safety of your highchairs, check the Parents.com Recall Finder, sign up for our Recall Alerts email, or check the Consumer Product Safety Commission’s website to see whether your model has been recalled.

Watch this video for more tips on keeping your baby safe in his high chair:

Prevent High Chair Injuries: How to Keep Your Child Safe
Prevent High Chair Injuries: How to Keep Your Child Safe
Prevent High Chair Injuries: How to Keep Your Child Safe

 

Plus: Find a broad selection of high chairs at Shop Parents.

Image: Baby in highchair, via Shutterstock

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Salmonella Outbreak in Chicken Sickens Hundreds

Wednesday, October 9th, 2013

Nearly 300 people in 18 states have been sickened by a salmonella bacteria that has been traced back to contaminated chicken packaged by Foster Farms, according to an alert released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.  Salmonella poisoning is especially dangerous for people with compromised immune systems and young infants.  More from The Boston Globe:

While some USDA employees have been furloughed due to the partial government shutdown, food safety inspectors at beef and poultry plants are still conducting routine inspections and investigating illness outbreaks.

Consumers can identify raw Foster Farm chicken products associated with the outbreak by looking for the following numbers on the package: P6137, P6137A, and P7632.

The products were mainly distributed to retail outlets in California, Oregon and Washington State, the USDA said, but no recall has been issued because the food safety service has been “unable to link the illnesses to a specific product and a specific production period.”

Instead, consumers should remember to handle all raw meat and poultry in a safe manner, cooking chicken thoroughly until it reaches an internal temperature of 165 °F. They should also avoid cross contamination of raw chicken juices with other foods like fresh produce that won’t be cooked before consuming; for example, they should use separate cutting boards for preparing these foods.

Another tip recommended by food safety scientists: Don’t wash raw poultry before preparing it since that can foster the spread of bacteria.

“If you wash it, you’re more likely to spray bacteria all over the kitchen and yourself,” said Drexel University food safety researcher Dr. Jennifer Quinlan in a new video campaign she launched to get people to stop rinsing raw chicken.

Image: Raw chicken, via Shutterstock

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Chobani Yogurts Remain in Some School Lunches

Thursday, September 19th, 2013

Chobani yogurts remain on the menus at schools in 4 states that are launching a healthy eating pilot program, even after discovery of possible mold contamination prompted a nationwide recall of some of the Greek yogurt company’s products.  More from NBC News:

Some 230 New York school districts have ordered more than 3,300 cases of Chobani products, while Idaho schools have requested more than 3,400 cases, school officials said.

Those states, along with Arizona and Tennessee, are part of a new U.S. Department of Agriculture pilot project to test the use of Greek-style yogurt as a healthy, high-protein addition to the National School Lunch Program.

The yogurt set for schools isn’t affected by the Sept. 5 Chobani recall, state and federal officials said. It won’t arrive for another couple of weeks and it’s being made in the firm’s New York plant, not the Twin Falls, Idaho, site where company officials detected mold after receiving consumer reports of bubbling, bulging cartons of yogurt. At least 223 complaints of illness tied to the recalled yogurt have been reported to the Food and Drug Administration, though they haven’t been confirmed.

“USDA is aware of the situation and will work with the company to ensure products delivered to schools are healthy and safe,” said agency spokeswoman Brooke Hardison.

Image: Elementary school cafeteria, via Shutterstock

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