Archive for the ‘ New Research ’ Category

Childhood Self-Control May Lead to Better Jobs Later in Life

Wednesday, April 15th, 2015

Self-controlParents who teach their children to be in control of their emotions, desires, and behavior may be setting their children up for a more successful life.

A new study published in the journal Psychological Science has now found a link between children with stronger self-control and higher-quality job prospects as adults. Children with self-control pay closer attention, prevail through tedious tasks, and shy away from impulsive behavior.

“While a link between adults’ self-control and immediate job success might seem obvious, it wasn’t clear whether measures of childhood self-control could forecast who successfully enters the workforce and avoids spells of unemployment across adult life,” notes Science Daily. A few years ago, another study also found a correlation between childhood self-control and fewer bad judgments during the teen years.

Related: How to Raise a Determined Child

Researchers used data from two previous studies of more than 15,000 children. They learned that children who displayed characteristics of self-control spent 40 percent less time unemployed than those who showed few signs of self-control—and this was especially true during times of recession and economic hardship.

A variety of factors can explain why those without self-control may have fewer job prospects and longer unemployment, such as inability to deal with stress, frequent job interruptions, and bad habits and lifestyle choices (poor time management and inconsistent sleep patterns).

Self-control can be developed in a number of ways. School programs, preschool interventions, meditation, and physical activities like yoga can all improve children’s control of themselves, says lead researcher Michael Daly.

Plus: Sign up for our daily newsletters to keep up with the latest news on child health and development.

Caitlin St John is an Editorial Assistant for Parents.com who splits her time between New York City and her hometown on Long Island. She’s a self-proclaimed foodie who loves dancing and anything to do with her baby nephew. Follow her on Twitter: @CAITYstjohn

Parenting Style: Positive Parenting
Parenting Style: Positive Parenting
Parenting Style: Positive Parenting

Image: Self-control via Shutterstock

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Getting Toddlers to Sleep More Might Increase Better Behavior

Tuesday, April 14th, 2015

Sleeping babyGetting an adequate amount of sleep is an essential part of our well-being, especially for toddlers who are still growing and developing. Too much sleep can worsen their sleep patterns, and negatively impact weight and intellectual and emotional development.

Now a new long-term study further supports the importance for toddlers to get just the right amount of shut-eye. Researchers found that toddlers who slept less than 10 hours per night (or who woke up frequently) usually had more behavioral and emotional problems by the time they were 5 years old.

Related: Toddler Sleep Solutions to Common Problems

For the study, more than 30,000 mothers filled out questionnaires about their child’s sleep behaviors at three points in their lives: when they were 17 weeks pregnant, when their child was 18-months-old, and when the child turned 5-years-old. A total of 99 behaviors were ranked on a scale from “not true” to “very true.” Mothers also answered how long their children slept per day and how often the children woke up during the night.

Almost 60 percent of toddlers slept for 13 to 14 hours while two percent slept less than 10 hours a night. But the findings were consistent in revealing that toddlers who slept less than 13 hours and woke up more than three times every night struggled with impulse control, emotional instability, anxiety, and depression. Despite the difficult temperament, toddlers may not develop mental health issues later in life.

However, the latest research confirms the importance of getting your toddler into a routine of a healthy sleep schedule – if you’re having problems, don’t hesitate to talk to your child’s pediatrician.

Plus: Sign up for our daily newsletters to keep up with the latest news on child health and development.

Caitlin St John is an Editorial Assistant for Parents.com who splits her time between New York City and her hometown on Long Island. She’s a self-proclaimed foodie who loves dancing and anything to do with her baby nephew. Follow her on Twitter: @CAITYstjohn

Baby Sleep: Get the Facts
Baby Sleep: Get the Facts
Baby Sleep: Get the Facts

Image: Sleeping baby via Shutterstock

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Why C-Sections Should Only Be Performed When Medically Necessary

Monday, April 13th, 2015

In delivery roomThe number of women giving birth via cesarean section has been on the rise for many years now: Approximately 33 percent of births in the United States are C-sections, according to data from the World Health Organization (WHO); however, WHO recently released a statement saying this procedure should only be performed if it’s absolutely medically necessary.

Physicians often turn to C-sections as the safest option when the baby is in an abnormal position or if the mother has been in labor for too long, but they are often performed when vaginal birth could still be viable option.

“For nearly 30 years, the international healthcare community has considered the ideal rate for cesarean sections to be between 10 percent and 15 percent,” the WHO report states.

Related: All About C-Sections: Before, During, and After

Although C-sections are one of the most commonly performed surgeries in the world, they can be harmful when unessentially performed. “As a country’s rate moves to 10 percent the rate of mother and child deaths decreases, but there’s no evidence to show that rates over 10 percent have any effect on mother and child mortality.”

The report also emphasizes the importance of doctors treating every situation individually, and confirms that C-sections effectively save maternal and infant lives when medically required. “Every effort should be made to provide cesarean sections to women in need, rather than striving to achieve a specific rate.”

Plus: Sign up for our daily newsletters to keep up with the latest news on child health and development.

Caitlin St John is an Editorial Assistant for Parents.com who splits her time between New York City and her hometown on Long Island. She’s a self-proclaimed foodie who loves dancing and anything to do with her baby nephew. Follow her on Twitter: @CAITYstjohn

Birth Stories: Emergency C-section
Birth Stories: Emergency C-section
Birth Stories: Emergency C-section

Image: Pregnant woman in delivery room via Shutterstock

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Childhood Trauma Could Lead to Type 1 Diabetes

Friday, April 10th, 2015

Diabetes consultationEvery year, more than 15,000 children in the U.S. are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D), but health professionals and scientists don’t have many answers about the causes and prevention methods for this autoimmune disease. Experts do believe that genetics and environmental triggers are factors in the development of type 1 diabetes, and that diet and exercise are not.

A recent study suggests that experiencing traumatic life events during childhood can increase the risk of developing type 1 diabetes later in life.

Researchers in Sweden examined more than 10,000 children between the ages of 2 and 14 who had not been diagnosed with T1D. Parents filled out questionnaires that measured their assessment of serious life events (death or illness in the family, conflicts, and divorce), parenting stress, parental worries, and parental social support.

Results indicated that kids who had experienced a serious life event during their first 14 years of life were nearly three times more likely to develop T1D than those who had not.

The authors of the study concluded that a possible link between stress and diabetes is an imbalance in the immune system. This imbalance could cause an autoimmune reaction against beta cells that produce the insulin necessary to regulate blood sugar. Other possible links between serious life experiences and the development of T1D do exist, and more research is needed to pinpoint when this type of psychological stress alters the autoimmune system.

“As experience of stressful life events cannot be avoided, children and their parents should get adequate support to cope with these events to avoid their consequences, which could include medical issues,” recommended the study’s authors.

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Caitlin St John is an Editorial Assistant for Parents.com who splits her time between New York City and her hometown on Long Island. She’s a self-proclaimed foodie who loves dancing and anything to do with her baby nephew. Follow her on Twitter: @CAITYstjohn

Online App Helps Kids With Diabetes Eat Safely
Online App Helps Kids With Diabetes Eat Safely
Online App Helps Kids With Diabetes Eat Safely

Image: Child learning about diabetes via Shutterstock

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One Way to Predict IVF Success More Accurately

Thursday, April 9th, 2015

Fertility test resultsAlthough in vitro fertilization (IVF) has been a mainstream procedure for decades, there are constant improvements in its technology. Just recently, scientists in Madrid created a test that could boost IVF success rates by calculating the ideal window of time to transfer an embryo.

Related: 9 Myths and Facts About Boosting IVF

There are also existing tools—like IVFpredict and the Templeton method—to help couples determine their chance of having a baby via IVF treatment. A team of researchers at the universities of Bristol and Glasgow set out to conclude how accurate these two personalized tools were by analyzing approximately 130,960 cycles of IVF.

Both models rely on couples’ reports of their infertility history. For the past 20 years, the Templeton method has been the most commonly-used prediction tool; however, it does not consider newly-developed treatments. But IVFpredict, which was developed in 2011, does incorporate new developments, like intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI).

“The findings showed both models underestimated the chances of a live birth, but this was particularly marked in the Templeton model,” reports EurekAlert. “The team updated the models to reflect very recent improvements in live birth rates and this improved both models; however, IVFpredict still remained the more accurate of the two.”

This latest study confirms the validity of IVFpredict and may lead health professionals to shy away from the more outdated Templeton method. IVFpredict is also available online for couples to access it directly.

Plus: Sign up for our daily newsletters to keep up with the latest news on child health and development.

Caitlin St John is an Editorial Assistant for Parents.com who splits her time between New York City and her hometown on Long Island. She’s a self-proclaimed foodie who loves dancing and anything to do with her baby nephew. Follow her on Twitter: @CAITYstjohn

Trying to Conceive: 5 Common Fertility Mistakes
Trying to Conceive: 5 Common Fertility Mistakes
Trying to Conceive: 5 Common Fertility Mistakes

Image: Analyzing test results via Shutterstock

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