Archive for the ‘ New Research ’ Category

Good Parenting Means Fewer Cavities for Your Kids!

Tuesday, February 17th, 2015

girl at dentistAs many of you already know, a child’s first trip to the dentist is not always the easiest. But what if you have the ability to control the outcome of your child’s teeth more than you thought?

A new study suggests just that—children will have less cavities if their parents display a more authoritative parenting style, and they also behave better than children whose parents are more permissive.

Authoritative parenting style is defined by the study as parents who displine kids while also giving them guidance. Permissive parents, on the other hand, are more likely to ignore bad behavior and let children make their own decisions.

The study followed 132 groups of parents and children who visited Nationwide Children’s Hospital. The children were all between the ages of 3 and 6. Researchers gathered information about parenting styles and the child’s behavior in order to reach their conclusions.

Ninety-three percent of children with authoritative parents showed positive behavior at the dentist’s office and, versus only 42 percent of the children with permissive parents. In addition, “80 percent of children with authoritative parents had cavities, compared to 97 percent of children of permissive parents,” reports Fox News.

It’s safe to say that the correlation between parenting style and a child’s behavior does not only apply to dentist appointments—other public scenarios would most likely yield the same results.

“A good parent who hopefully does the right things at home and is developing a child who’s respectful and careful and curious, but within limits, is the kind of parent who’s going to provide a child who’s relaxed and knows how to behave,” said Dr. Paul Casamassimo, chief of dentistry at Nationwide Children’s and author of the study.

Caitlin St John is an Editorial Assistant for Parents.com who splits her time between New York City and her hometown on Long Island. She’s a self-proclaimed foodie who loves dancing and anything to do with her baby nephew. Follow her on Twitter: @CAITYstjohn

Dental Experts Remind Parents, Toddlers Need to Visit Dentist by Age 1
Dental Experts Remind Parents, Toddlers Need to Visit Dentist by Age 1
Dental Experts Remind Parents, Toddlers Need to Visit Dentist by Age 1

Image: Girl at the dentist via Shutterstock

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83 Percent Believe in Vaccine Safety, But Millennials Still Have Doubts

Monday, February 16th, 2015

vaccine vialsA Pew poll conducted between Feb. 3-5 with over 1,000 U.S. adults revealed that 83 percent believe the MMR vaccine for measles is safe for healthy children, versus 9 percent (with 7 percent uncertain).

But of the 83 percent, confidence in vaccine safety decreased in younger age groups. In the 50+ age group, 90 percent believed in the necessity of vaccines. In the 30-49 age group, the number decreased to 81 percent, and in the 18-29 group, the number decreased further to 77 percent.

Both men and women shared roughly an equal amount of confidence in vaccines (81 percent men; 85 percent women).

Education level also played a factor in affecting an adult’s support of vaccines — the higher the education level, the more adults were likely to say vaccines are safe (92 percent college versus 77 percent high school).

When asked, the reasons younger generations were skeptical about vaccines included: uncertainty over their effectiveness, suspicion with pharmaceutical companies, and confusion over why healthy kids would need vaccines. Surprisingly, few adults raised autism and vaccines as a concern.

The poll comes at a time when the measles outbreak is ongoing, with over 120 cases across 17 states.

Sherry Huang is a Features Editor for Parents.com. She loves collecting children’s picture books and has an undeniable love for cookies of all kinds. Her spirit animal would be Beyoncé Pad Thai. Follow her on Twitter @sherendipitea

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Vaccines for Babies and Older Kids
Vaccines for Babies and Older Kids
Vaccines for Babies and Older Kids

Photo of vaccine vials via Shutterstock

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How Do Parents Really Choose Their Children’s Schools?

Thursday, February 12th, 2015

Children going to schoolParents want what’s best for their children—they want to provide them with the best chance for success and the best opportunities, which means picking the right school is a priority.

However, a new study published by the Education Research Alliance for New Orleans suggests that parents don’t always choose schools solely based on academic prestige. Research found that “parents, especially low-income parents, actually show strong preferences for other qualities like location and extracurriculars,” according to NPR.

The majority of New Orleans children attend charter schools—9 out of 10—which leaves more room for choice than areas where public schools are most popular. Researchers established a few key findings when they analyzed the schools parents actually picked: distance from home, extracurriculars (especially for high schoolers), and available before- or after-school programs. These three factors were especially important for low-income families. Parents still cared about academics—but not as much as they said when interviewed about the topic.

While this study only reflects the choices of New Orleans parents, it’s likely that parents in other areas of the country make very similar decisions. Further research by the Education Research Alliance is in the works to establish if the same trends occur in other cities.

Caitlin St John is an Editorial Assistant for Parents.com who splits her time between New York City and her hometown on Long Island. She’s a self-proclaimed foodie who loves dancing and anything to do with her baby nephew. Follow her on Twitter: @CAITYstjohn

Helping Your Child Succeed At School
Helping Your Child Succeed At School
Helping Your Child Succeed At School

Image: Children getting on school bus via Shutterstock

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The Reason You May Lie More in Front of Boys

Thursday, February 12th, 2015

lying with fingers behind backWhen it comes to lying in front of boys and girls, it turns out parents are not equal opportunists.

A new study on dishonesty, released by the National Bureau of Economic Research, offered a surprising revelation: that parents are more apt to lie in front of their sons than their daughters.

The reason for the gender difference is uncertain, but it’s possible that “dishonest behavior is considered more socially acceptable for boys,” says Anya Savikhin Samek, a co-author of the study. Samek also speculates that cultural expectations (like ones to raise good little girls who are pure in heart) may feed into a parent’s decision to be more careful, or that parents may believe that girls suffer more consequences for lying when they’re adults.

Researchers conducted a simple experiment with 152 parents and their kids (ages 3 to 6). Each parent was asked to flip two coins, both with a blue side and a green side. A $10 reward would be given every time two coins landed green-side up. Each parent was then left alone or with their child in a room, to flip the coins a few times and record the results.

The researchers then compared the number of recorded wins (60 percent) to the probability of winning (25 percent), which determined that a majority of parents definitely lied about winning.

Of course, parents were more likely to lie when they were alone, but researchers discovered that when a son was present, a 40 percent win was recorded (versus a 25 percent win in front of a daughter).

This latest research adds to a wider conversation about perceived gender differences between boys and girls, gender stereotypes, and how boys may be raised differently. But it also shows that to prevent kids from lying, parents need to curb their own tendency to lie first.

Sherry Huang is a Features Editor for Parents.com. She loves collecting children’s picture books and has an undeniable love for cookies of all kinds. Her spirit animal would be Beyoncé Pad Thai. Follow her on Twitter @sherendipitea

Mom Confessions: Lies I've Told My Kids
Mom Confessions: Lies I've Told My Kids
Mom Confessions: Lies I've Told My Kids

Photo: Lying with fingers behind back via Shutterstock

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Three IUDs and Implants Can Still Be Used Past End Dates

Friday, February 6th, 2015

Woman with IUDWomen who opt for intrauterine devices (IUDs) and implants as birth control may be able to use the contraceptives longer — and with the same effectiveness — than the recommended end date, according to a new study.

The research, published in Obstetrics & Gynecology, confirms that three types of hormonal IUDs and implants (Mirena, Implanon, and Nexplanon) can last a year longer than what is currently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

An IUD (like Mirena) is a small T-shaped piece of plastic that is inserted directly into the uterus for up to five years; implants (like Implanon and Nexplanon) are matchstick-sized plastic rods that are inserted into the arm for up to three years.

“Both implants and IUDs work by releasing small doses of a synthetic version of the female sex hormone progestin, which keeps ovaries from releasing eggs,” notes CBS News. “There’s only a certain amount of a progestin available in these devices, which is why the FDA sets an expiration date.”

By extending the lifetime of these devices, women and health care companies could save money, but manufacturers may be reluctant to endorse extensions that could cause them to sell fewer contraceptives.

Researchers followed 800 women between the ages of 18 and 45, which included 263 women with IUDs and 237 with implants. The women were examined for one year after their device expired. “There were no pregnancies in the implant group and only one pregnancy in the IUD group, a failure rate similar to that of hormonal IUDs within the approved five years of use,” reports Health Day.

Caitlin St John is an Editorial Assistant for Parents.com who splits her time between New York City and her hometown on Long Island. She’s a self-proclaimed foodie who loves dancing and anything to do with her adorable baby nephew. Follow her on Twitter: @CAITYstjohn

How to Take a CVS Pregnancy Test
How to Take a CVS Pregnancy Test
How to Take a CVS Pregnancy Test

Image: Woman holding IUD via Shutterstock

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