Codeine Use Continues Despite Warnings About Kids’ Safety

Doctors are continuing to prescribe codeine to children despite nearly two decades of warnings against its use, according to new research published in the journal Pediatrics.  More from CNN:

Every year, there are up to 870,000 prescriptions of codeine written for children in emergency rooms in the United States.

And that’s a huge danger, because the narcotic can have particularly powerful effects on children. So powerful that the American Academy of Pediatrics issued guidelines against its use in 1997. Yet, despite those guidelines, a new study in the journal Pediatrics has found that little has changed in codeine prescribing habits.

Study author Dr. Sunitha Kaiser and her colleagues evaluated the National Hospital and Ambulatory Medical Care Survey database for emergency room visits of children between the ages of 3 and 17  from 2010 through 2010. They found found that in the nine years evaluated, the percentage of codeine prescriptions dropped very little – from 3.7%  to 2.9%.

Codeine can be a particular threat to children, because they can metabolize it very differently than adults. Up to a third of all children don’t process it efficiently, so that they need more than a standard dose. Another 8% of children metabolize it too quickly, meaning a standard dose can result in a fatal overdose.

“Codeine is notorious for rashes, hives, vomiting in kids, and constipation. You can be allergic to it,” says Dr. Alan Woolf, director of the Pediatric Environmental Health Center at Boston Children’s Hospital. Woolf wrote an accompanying editorial titled “Why Can’t We Retire Codeine?” in the same issue of Pediatrics.

Kaiser and her colleagues found that children between the ages of 8 and 12 were most likely to be prescribed the drug. While coughs and colds were commonly cited as a reason for codeine, the AAP’s guidelines specifically state “no well-controlled scientific studies were found that support the efficacy and safety of narcotics (including codeine).”

“Codeine’s been around a long time. You know, just like many other drugs, there’s complacency about it. Because it has such name value, people assume it’s safe. … And I don’t think a lot of practitioners, and a lot of (the) public, makes the connection between codeine and narcotic,” says Woolf.

Image: Pills, via Shutterstock

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