Record Number of Kids Getting Flu Shots

Efforts by public health officials to encourage families to have their children vaccinated against seasonal flu appear to be paying off, as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has announced that more children than ever received the vaccine in the 2012-2013 season.  More from Time.com:

The researchers say the increase is encouraging for this year’s numbers as well.

Last season, 56.6% of kids between the ages 6 months to 17-years-old were vaccinated, a 5.1% increase from the year prior. Smaller — but still notable — increases were seen among adult populations too, which were up 2.7%. Overall, 45% of the U.S. population got a flu shot last year.

Although rates are up across the board, there are some disparities among ethnic and racial groups. However, the traditional ethnic and racial disparities were not seen among U.S. children.

The numbers were announced during a press conference with Dr. Howard Koh, the Assistant Secretary of Health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Dr. Anne Schuchat, the Assistant Surgeon General.

The increases are remarkable because they indicate that public health messaging is getting through to the right groups. The U.S. made a universal recommendation in 2010 that everyone 6 months and older should get an annual flu vaccines. But that doesn’t mean the push for more vaccinating will relax. “Despite substantial progress, we can do even more to make our country healthier through prevention. Flu vaccination should represent a simple investment we make year in and year out to maximize the gift of health,” said Dr. Koh.

Image: Child getting shot, via Shutterstock
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