Breastfed Babies May Have Lower ADHD Risk

Breastfed babies may carry a lower risk of being diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), which is the most commonly diagnosed behavioral disorder in children, according to new research conducted at Tel Aviv University.  More from ScienceDaily.com:

Seeking to determine if the development of ADHD was associated with lower rates of breastfeeding, Dr. Aviva Mimouni-Bloch, of Tel Aviv University’s Sackler Faculty of Medicine and Head of the Child Neurodevelopmental Center in Loewenstein Hospital, and her fellow researchers completed a retrospective study on the breastfeeding habits of parents of three groups of children: a group that had been diagnosed with ADHD; siblings of those diagnosed with ADHD; and a control group of children without ADHD and lacking any genetic ties to the disorder.

The researchers found a clear link between rates of breastfeeding and the likelihood of developing ADHD, even when typical risk factors were taken into consideration. Children who were bottle-fed at three months of age were found to be three times more likely to have ADHD than those who were breastfed during the same period. These results have been published in Breastfeeding Medicine.

Image: Breastfeeding mother, via Shutterstock

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