Parents’ Health Plans May Not Cover Children’s Pregnancies

The new health care law allows parents to insure their children under the parents’ plans until the kids are 26 years old, but the law does not guarantee that that health coverage would apply should the daughters of those parents become pregnant.  From The Washington Post:

Group health plans with 15 or more workers are required to provide maternity benefits for employees and their spouses under the Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978. But other dependents of employees aren’t covered by the law, so companies don’t have to provide maternity coverage for them.

Although hard numbers aren’t available on how many companies don’t provide dependent maternity benefits, “I would say it’s common,” says Dania Palanker, a senior health policy adviser at the National Women’s Law Center. And the number could grow with the recent expansion of coverage to children under age 26, she says.

Dan Priga, who heads the performance audit group for Mercer, a human resources consulting company, estimates that roughly 70 percent of companies that pay their employees’ healthcare claims directly choose not to provide dependent maternity benefits.

In 2008, an estimated 2.8 million women ages 15 through 25 got pregnant, 12 percent of all those in this age group, according to researchers at the National Center for Health Statistics. (That is the most recent year for which there are pregnancy estimates.)

The article also quotes the March of Dimes as saying that the average cost for uncomplicated maternity care (including prenatal care, a routine delivery and three months postpartum care) was $10,652 in 2007.

Image: Pregnant teens, via Shutterstock.

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