Census Report: Over Half of Working Mothers Get Paid Leave

A new report based on census data found that 51 percent of working women who had their first child between 2006 and 2008 received some sort of paid leave (maternity, sick, or vacation) from their employers.  This number was up from previous data, with only 42 percent of women receiving similar paid leave between 1996 and 2000.

The report, Maternity Leave and Employment Patterns of First-Time Mothers, 1961-2008, uses census data to follow trends in women’s work experience before and after they have children.  Key findings from the report include:

  • Women are more likely to work while pregnant than they did in the 1960s. Two-thirds (66 percent) of women who had their first birth between 2006 and 2008 worked during pregnancy, compared with 44 percent who had their first birth between 1961 and 1965.
  • Eight out of 10 (82 percent) working women who had their first birth between 2006 and 2008 worked within one month of their child’s birth compared with 73 percent of working women who gave birth to their first child between 1991 and 1995.
  • Older mothers are more likely than younger mothers to work closer to the end of their pregnancies. Sixty-seven percent of mothers 22 and older worked into the last month of their pregnancy, compared with 56 percent of mothers less than age 22.
  • Four out of 10 (42 percent) women received unpaid maternity leave. Both paid and unpaid maternity leave were more likely to be used after birth than before.
  • Twenty-two percent of first time mothers quit their jobs – 16 percent while they were pregnant and another 6 percent by 12 weeks after their child’s birth.
  • Women who worked during their pregnancy are more likely to return to work within three to five months compared with women who did not work before the birth of their first child.
  • Eight out of 10 mothers who worked during their pregnancy returned to work within a year of their child’s birth to the same employer. About seven out of 10 of these women returned to a job at the same pay, skill level and hours worked per week.
  • Two out of 10 mothers switched employers when returning to work. These mothers experienced greater job changes compared with mothers who returned to the same employer. One out of four was employed at a new job that had comparable pay, skill level and hours worked.

(image via: http://blogs.babycenter.com/)

 

 

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