Author Allison Winn Scotch Talks About Her New Book ‘Theory of Opposites’ and The Myth of Having It All

Former Parents.com blogger and current New York Times bestselling author Allison Winn Scotch wrote a cool new novel, and of course she wants to tell us about it. In her book, The Theory of Opposites, she writes about a woman who thinks she has the perfect life–that the stars have aligned for her and her dreams have come true. Then, her husband asks for a “break,” her boss fires her and all hell breaks loose. Read this book for a fun–and sometimes sad–adventure through heartbreak and healing.
What inspired Allison to write this kind of women’s fiction? Find out in her guest blog below:
“What’s the toughest part of parenting for you, dear readers?
For me, It is accepting that I can’t control everything in my kids’ lives. Not the day to day stuff. I’ve always been a parent who believes that children have to sort out many things on their own, and with a 9-year-old son and 6-year-old daughter, there is plenty to sort out. :) Complicated friendships; homework time-management; sticking up for themselves against a not-so-nice kid who sits behind them on the bus; sibling squabbles that could potentially end in broken limbs. These are things that I happily let my kids manage on their own (unless I really do sense that a broken limb is imminent). 
But the bigger picture stuff is harder for me – what happens if something goes wrong; what happens if there’s an accident, an earthquake, an illness that turns more severe? How would I cope, what on earth would I do to sustain myself? I try not to consider it too much because life is big and mysterious and in many ways, out of our hands, but still…every once in a while, these notions keep me up at night. I’m old enough now to have witnessed tragedy befall friends – sick children, sick parents, car accidents. The list goes on. Do we shrug our figurative shoulders and say, “that’s life,” or do we try to wrestle back some notion of control and change whatever we can about our destiny?
I think I’ve always been someone who has contemplated fate and its role in our lives, but I’ve really only grown fascinated with it after having kids. After all, it’s hard to be a parent and not consider the ways that fate has played its hand. Even in the timing of the conception of our kids. What if we’d had sex a day later? Our child might be a totally different child. Weird (and heavy) to ponder. But I pondered these ideas endlessly as I was writing my most recent book, which explores fate and “meant-to-be,” and while I wish that I’d made better peace the idea that I can’t drive all aspects of my life, I don’t think that I quite have. I want to be in control. I want to know that whatever happens, that my kids will be protected. I want to ensure a happily-ever-after ending for everyone whom I love. So I try to make the best choices that I can, and I try to be proactive in these choices – steering life in ways that I want to, rather than letting life steer me. I don’t know if this changes anything; I don’t know anything about anything really. But I do know that it helps me sleep just a little bit better at night.
It’s hard to be a parent and send your child out into the world, knowing that you can’t shield him or her from everything that will come his way. It flies against every instinct that I have, and yet…what other choice can we make? Life happens, and it’s usually big and wonderful and joyous. Sometimes, it’s not. Is that fate or is that simply the way that it went for you that day? I don’t know. I can’t know, but I’ll keep trying to wrestle control as much as I can. And the rest…well, maybe that really is just meant-to-be.
Anyone else relate? What’s the toughest thing for you about parenting?”
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