Posts Tagged ‘ popular boys names ’

Top British Baby Names—Revealed!

Friday, August 15th, 2014

It takes a little longer for the U.K. to release their baby name stats, but we finally have a look at what was hot in 2013 across the pond. And to no one’s surprise, George made a huge surge forward, thanks to a certain young fellow born there last year. (It’s now officially top 10.)

In fact, it looks like interest in royal names surged at the same time—Victoria and Albert, which were both circulated as possibilities for the royal baby, also saw gains this year. But topping the British charts for girls was Amelia for the third year running, and Oliver regained the top spot, pushing Harry down to #3 for boys.

While the U.S. and U.K. charts definitely have some crossover—Olivia, Emily, Ava, Isabella, Jacob, and William are all top 10 in both countries—there are some unique ideas that could be worth emulating.

1. The nickname name. We definitely prefer formality in our names here in the U.S., but the U.K. favors just going with the nickname as the name—especially if you can make it end with that “e” sound. That’s how names like Charlie, Alfie, Sophie and Evie hit the top 20. Elsie is the biggest climber in the UK top 100 for girls, and Teddy for boys. Other hot “e” names in the U.K. included Archie, Rosie, Frankie and Gracie.

2. The undiscovered name. The U.K.’s top 10 includes names that don’t rank anywhere near that in the U.S. Consider Oscar, which jumped 10 places into the #7 spot in the U.K., but is on a bit of a decline and at number 178 in the U.S. On the girls’ side, Poppy hit the top 10 this year after climbing 6 spots, and it isn’t even in the top 1000 in the U.S. Other names to consider that are far lower in popularity here: Arthur, Hugo and Felix for boys, Florence, Zara and Eleanor for girls.

3. The stodgy name. While we have a tendency to be creative in spelling or in making up a new name (hello, Jaden and Nevaeh), the U.K. loves to recycle names—and there are definitely some old-school names in their top 100 that you haven’t seen much of here in the U.S. On the boys’ side, there’s the already mentioned Albert, plus Harvey, Stanley and Frederick; for girls, you’ll find Tilly, Martha, Harriet, and Beatrice.

You can view the whole U.K. top 100 baby names here, and tell us what your favorites are.

If you’re still looking for the perfect baby name, email me at lamilbrand@gmail.com, and your dilemma could be featured here or in our sister publication, American Baby. (Or check out our Baby Name Finder to do your own searching!) And don’t forget to like In Name Only on Facebook to keep up with the very latest in baby names!

British Baby Names
British Baby Names
British Baby Names

Image: British baby by MartiniDry/Shutterstock.com

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Baby Name Dilemma: An Italian Boys’ Name, No “O” Please

Wednesday, July 30th, 2014

Lots of great dilemmas in my inbox! Reader Lisa has an exciting challenge (and a short timeframe—hope we get this help to you in time):

My husband and I are really stuck for a name for our Baby Boy #3. We used our two “dream” names for our first two sons, Julian and Anthony, and now can’t think of a 3rd name that will fit with all our criteria.

In our case, both our other sons’ names are Latin-based and fit with our last name, a very Italian-sounding Molinaro. So we’d like our third pick to work with our last name as well, however I have huge reservations about making the whole name sound “super-Italian” as I call it. In addition, I’d like the 3rd name to fit with our first two, so for example: Julian, Anthony, and Billy, wouldn’t go together in my opinion. To complicate matters further, I’m a teacher, so I’m turned off of a number of names, and my husband and I just can’t seem to agree. Here’s where an unbiased 3rd party, such as yourself, could be helpful.

Some other “would-be-nice” criteria for the name include:
– also 3 syllables
– is more of a classic name, rather than a hot-right-now name
– doesn’t end in an “O” – i.e – Franco, Juliano, etc.

I’m immediately thinking of the old-school Latin “us” names, which have become so hot lately. Some picks I love: Augustus, Atticus, Darius and Magnus, which are up-and-comers, but not yet everywhere. (I especially love Augustus, which may eventually be on an upswing thanks to the book/movie The Fault in Our Stars, but is currently just inside the top 700.)

There are a couple of names that have a stronger Italian connotation, but I like with your other picks. Have you considered Dante, Dominic or Salvatore?

And finally, a few options that also come from Latin, but don’t end in “us.” I like Francis, Felix, and Maximilian. (Max Molinaro just sounds pretty great to me!)

So help Lisa out: What other names go with Anthony and Julian? Share your favorites in the comments!

If you’re looking for a great name, start your hunt with our Baby Name Finder, and send along your dilemmas to me at lamilbrand@gmail.com. And don’t forget to like In Name Only on Facebook to keep up with the very latest in baby names.

Baby Names: Avoid Baby Naming Regret
Baby Names: Avoid Baby Naming Regret
Baby Names: Avoid Baby Naming Regret

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Cool Name of the Week: Gavin

Monday, June 30th, 2014

My sister seems to be really good at picking baby names just before they peak. My oldest nephew, Aidan, was born in 2003, when the correct spelling of this Irish saint’s name hit its pinnacle. (That was before the alternate spelling, Aiden, climbed into the baby name stratosphere.) And the same goes for my younger nephew, who was born nine years ago today and given the recently cool name Gavin. (Happy Birthday, Gavin!)

Gavin’s a Celtic name that means “white hawk,” a fierce meaning that doesn’t seem quite so fitting with my charming and sweet nephew. (We all joke that he’ll get into politics with his charisma and ability to sway you into doing his bidding!) The name’s biggest claims to fame—at least until my nephew makes his run for President—is rocker (and Gwen Stefani husband) Gavin Rossdale, and Love Boat actor Gavin MacLeod. It’s fallen off a little from its peak at #30, and now stands just inside the top 50 baby names. And yes, it makes a nice alternative to some of the “den” names, like his big brother Aidan, Braeden and Jayden.

My sister paired Gavin with a family surname as the middle name, but it’d work beautifully with either a long or short middle name, depending on the length of the last name. James and Alexander work nicely if you like something more traditional, or Chase or Wilder if you don’t.

Tell us: What do you think of the name Gavin? Is it something you’d consider for your son, or is it too popular for your taste? If you’re still looking for the perfect baby name, check out our Baby Name Finder. And don’t forget to like In Name Only on Facebook to keep up with the very latest in baby names.

Irish Baby Names
Irish Baby Names
Irish Baby Names

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Ginnifer Goodwin and Josh Dallas Named Their Son…

Wednesday, June 4th, 2014

No, it wasn’t Neal! (That was the name of their baby prince on Once Upon a Time, where they play Snow White and Prince Charming, respectively.) Instead, Ginnifer and Josh chose the perfectly charming Oliver Finlay for their real-life prince.

Oliver has been a popular choice for boys in the U.S. lately—it’s been in the top 100 names for the past 5 years, and is now 52nd in the U.S. (Across the pond in the U.K., it’s the second most popular name!) It means olive tree, a traditional signifier of peace (think of extending the olive branch). It’s a name that feels fresh and friendly—and hasn’t been quite overdone here (at least, not yet!).

Finlay is a Scottish name that means “fair-haired hero.” And given the rise in the popularity of Finn, this might be a good variation to get you to that nickname—it hasn’t yet cracked the top 10. The Finley spelling is more popular in the U.S., and has become virtually unisex these days.

In all, Oliver Finlay Dallas is a pretty fabulous baby name!

Tell me: What do you think of Ginnifer and Josh’s choice? Are either of those names on your short list?

If you’re still looking for the perfect name, try our Baby Name Finder. And don’t forget to like In Name Only to keep up with the very latest in baby names.

 

British Baby Names
British Baby Names
British Baby Names

 

Image of Ginnifer Goodwin and Josh Dallas courtesy of S_Bukley/Shutterstock

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What Baby Names Are Rising—And Falling?

Tuesday, May 13th, 2014

While this year brought a big shakeup at the top of the boys’ charts, the more interesting story is what names are rising fast on the charts—and what’s tanking. The fastest risers may give an indication of the latest trends (or a pop culture phenomenon at work).

Top risers for girls include Daleyza (up a whopping 3130 spots), a name invented by reality star Larry Hernandez of Larrymania; Marjorie (up 735 places), which may be riding on the coattails of Game of Thrones‘ version of Princess Di, Margaery; Lennon, the former Beatles’ surname gone girls’ name; and the celeb favorite Everly/Everleigh—both spellings were among the top risers for girls. Two of my favorites among the girls’ high-riser lists are Freya, the Scandinavian goddess, and Mabel, Bruce Willis’ pick for his nearly two-year-old.

On the boys’ hot list is Jayceon (up 845 spots), a creative spelling of standby Jason; place name Milan (up 650), picked by Shakira for her son; mythological name Atlas (up 614); and the other Jason/Jay “creative” alternative, Jayse.

Among my favorites on the boys’ high rise list, you’ll find a pair of title names, Duke and Deacon, and the Scandinavian royal name Magnus, a favorite of celebrities and a literally great name.

And of course, what goes up must come down! The boys’ name biggest losers were all creative spellings of popular names: Austyn, Masen, Trevon, Jaidyn and Bently. (Unfortunately for those who hate creative spellings, there were plenty of oddly spelled names among the up-and-comers, too.) The girls’ name losers were a mixed bag: Litzy, a Mexican nickname popularized by a pop songstress, old-lady name Geraldine, plus Marisa, Taraji and Adley.

You can view the whole list of movers and shakers on the Social Security Administration site. Tell me: What is your favorite on these lists? And where do you stand on the whole creative spelling thing?

Keep watching this blog for more updates on the baby name list (you can like me on Facebook to ensure you’re always in the know)! And if you’re still looking for the perfect baby name, check out our baby name finder!

Baby Names: How to Know You've Picked the Right Name
Baby Names: How to Know You've Picked the Right Name
Baby Names: How to Know You've Picked the Right Name

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