Posts Tagged ‘ baby names ’

Cool Name of the Week: January

Sunday, January 12th, 2014

Are you feeling like you’re living in the movie Frozen? Where I am, winter isn’t coming—it’s here and it’s here to stay for a while. Which led me to think of some really cool wintry names. There’s Winter, which has become the fresh new seasonal baby name and is giving Autumn a run for the money. And names like Snow have become a cool middle name du jour.

But for my money, I like January. It’s newer to the game as a month name—April, May and June have been classic girls’ choices, while August and October are intriguing unisex choices. And it’s based on Janus, the Roman god of doorways, who helped usher in the new year. That gives the name a perpetual freshness.

January has two claims to fame (besides the first month of the year, of course). There’s a character in a popular Jacqueline Susann novel, and of course, Mad Men vixen January Jones (whose name was inspired by the Jacqueline Susann novel).

As for middle names, January sounds a little too precious paired with Snow, but I like it with Jane, Maeve or Rose.
What do you think of the name January? Too frosty for your daughter? If you are still looking for a name, check out our Baby Name Finder. And don’t forget to like In Name Only on Facebook to keep up with the very latest in baby names!

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Baby Names: Is It Too Unusual?
Baby Names: Is It Too Unusual?
Baby Names: Is It Too Unusual?

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Would You Name Your Baby After Your Favorite Sports Team?

Wednesday, January 1st, 2014

That’s what one couple in Alabama did—they gave their son the creatively spelled moniker Krimson Tyde, after the University of Alabama’s legendary sports program. And apparently, they’re not alone—among the few kids named Crimson (or in this case, Krimson), most are residents of the state of Alabama.

I’m not sure how many mascots lend themselves to baby names, though—and while I like the idea of Crimson as an offbeat baby name, putting it with Tide kind of leaves me cold (it feels like blood in the water, a la D-Day, to me). My two alma maters are on opposite ends of the spectrum, baby name wise. St. Bonaventure’s Bonnies are a no-brainer (the lovely Scottish name Bonnie was a top name in the 1940s-1950s). But the Syracuse Orangemen? Well, I don’t see Syracuse or Orange exactly lighting up the baby name charts.

Some people opt to name a child after a sports hero, but with so many pro athletes facing scandals, that’s a bit of a gamble—disgraced bicycling athlete Lance Armstrong, for instance, helped his name spike in popularity after his Tour wins—but Lance is on a sharp decline now that he’s admitted to doping.

What do you think—does Crimson Tide (or Krimson Tyde) make a good baby name? Did you pick an athlete or a sports team to inspire your own child’s baby name?

If your alma mater doesn’t have a good baby name option, consider checking out our Baby Name Finder for some great baby name inspiration. And don’t forget to like In Name Only on Facebook to keep up with the latest in baby names.

Image: Football by RONORMANJR/Shutterstock.com
Use our Baby Name Finder to discover your child’s perfect moniker.

Baby Names: Avoid Baby Naming Regret
Baby Names: Avoid Baby Naming Regret
Baby Names: Avoid Baby Naming Regret

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Celebrity Baby Names: Rachel Zoe’s Son

Sunday, December 29th, 2013

Sorry we’ve been a little busy holidaying it up at In Name Only, and I nearly missed an intriguing baby name from stylist-turned-designer Rachel Zoe. She and her husband welcomed Rodger Berman welcomed a second son before Christmas, and named him Kaius Jagger—with plans to call him Kai. He joins their first son, Skyler.

Kaius is an alternative spelling for Caius, an ancient Roman name that means rejoice. Latin and Latin-style names have become very popular lately—like Atticus, Magnus and Augustus. Kai itself is a Hawaiian name that means “sea,” and has been pretty popular lately. (It’s currently in the top 200 baby names.)

Jagger is a surname name, usually used by fans of Rolling Stones’ Mick Jagger—and it’s been on a sharp rise in the past few years.

I’d probably prefer the old school Caius spelling, as an old-fashioned namer at heart. The K feels just a little too Kardashian for my taste. But I think it’s a fun name that works for the son of a very fashionable couple.

What do you think of Rachel Zoe’s pick? Anything you’d consider for your son amongst her name choices?

Don’t forget to like In Name Only to keep up with the latest in baby names—and check out our Baby Name Finder for some help finding a fab name for your son or daughter!

Baby Names: How to Pick a Great Name
Baby Names: How to Pick a Great Name
Baby Names: How to Pick a Great Name

Image: Rachel Zoe by s_bukley / Shutterstock.com

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Throwback Thursday: 1900s Baby Names

Thursday, December 19th, 2013

Today’s Throwback Thursday heads back to the turn of the 20th century, when many of the old-fashioned names that we’re loving now were in vogue. For girls, that meant names like Lillian, Grace, Rose and Clara, while William, Jack, James and Charles were stylish for boys.

But there are some unique names from the top of the list that haven’t made it back into fashion. Could one of these vintage baby names make it on your short list?

GIRLS NAMES

Inez is the Portuguese version of Agnes, and means pure. It hit its peak in the 1900s, when it fell just a bit outside the top 100. It hasn’t been in the top 1000 since the 1970s, but I think it’s ready for a fresh run for the top.

With names like Ruby, Jade and Pearl becoming popular, could other gem names be far behind? I love Opal, which was the #98 name in the 1900s. Consider it especially for a daughter born in October, when opal is the birthstone.

I’m pretty partial to the name Margaret (it’s my youngest daughter’s name), but Marguerite is pretty darned stylish, too. It’s the French version of Margaret, which means pearl—and it’s also the name of a flower.

Lucille was nearing its peak in the 1900s, when it was the 51st most popular name. It’s a fun way to get to Lucy, and pays homage to the legendary comedienne. If you don’t want people to think of the wacky redhead, try the variant Lucilla.

Edith has a lovely meaning—prosperity—and the perfect way to follow the E-name trend without going for the overused Ella or Emma. (And I love the nickname Edie!)

Gladys was the 14th most popular name back in the 1900s, a Welsh gem that actually means “lame.” I think it’s a lovely name, though.

BOYS NAMES

Roosevelt reached its pinnacle of popularity for boys back in the 1900s, thanks to the indomitable prez Teddy. It’s a Dutch surname that means rose field, and fell out of favor back in the 1990s.

Willard has the Today Show’s longtime weatherman/100th-birthday wisher Willard Scott to recommend it, and a cool meaning—brave. It’s a nice way to get to Will without the uberpopular William.

Virgil was Rome’s finest poet—a Latin name that means staff bearer. It was at its peak of popularity back in the 1900s, and comes with the cute “Gil” nickname

Luther is a German name that means army people, and  stayed in the top 100 until 1910. Consider it a cool way to pay homage to Martin Luther King—or Superman baddie Lex Luthor.

Howard means brave heart, and was a top 50 name through the late 19th and early 20th century, before a steep nosedive starting in the 1980s (could the infamous 80s-era flop Howard the Duck be to blame?). Skip Howie and go with the cool Ward for a nickname.

Albert was one of my front runners for a royal baby name—it means “noble,” and was the name of Queen Victoria’s beloved husband. I love the nickname “Bertie” for a little boy. Too cool!

What do you think of these turn-of-the-century names? Could you imagine a little Willard or Edith? Look for the perfect baby name with our Baby Name Finder, and check out my advice for the biggest baby name trends of next year.

 

Baby Names: How to Pick a Great Name
Baby Names: How to Pick a Great Name
Baby Names: How to Pick a Great Name

 

Image: 1900s couple by velora / Shutterstock.com

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Baby Name Dilemma: Honoring Your Mom

Wednesday, December 18th, 2013

A reader is trying to help a friend with a not-so-easy baby name challenge:

My friend would like to name her baby girl after her deceased mother, but her mom hated her name. She is looking for a variation but we have had no luck helping her brainstorm. Her mother’s name was Ernestine, no middle name. Any suggestions?

I can understand not wanting to pick Ernestine itself—it’s still plagued with a bit of a clunky vibe, and hasn’t been in the top 1000 in nearly 50 years. Its international variations and common nicknames, like Erna and Ernesia, don’t exactly sound as “wow” as your friend would probably like. Plus, since her mom hated her own name, it may not be the best way to honor her mother’s memory.

So here are my suggestions:

1. I could make a case for Nessa or Tessa being nicknames for Ernestine. Nessa is a Scandinavian name that means “headlands,” and Tessa means “to reap.” I think both names seem fresh and modern, and worth a look. Other variants on the name include Tina (which just fell out of vogue earlier this century) and Nettie.

2. Pick a name with a similar meaning to Ernestine. Ernestine is the feminine version of Ernest, which means serious or resolute. Along those same lines are Severine, Wilhelmina and Willa. Willa is a red-hot name, and Wilhelmina may follow suit, too—especially as it’s been picked by a few celebrities recently.

3. Honor her by choosing a name with the same initial, and even the same number of syllables. There are so many wonderful E names—I love Eleanor, Edina, Elena, Ellery, Emmeline, Eveline,  and Everly.

4. Consider making Ernestine the middle name, and picking another name for the first name. That way, her mother is still honored, but her daughter isn’t stuck with a clunky name.

5. Is there a name that her mother wished she had? If your friend knows what her mom’s dream name would have been, that could also be a valid way to honor her mother.

What do you think? Do you have any other suggestions for names that honor Ernestine without actually using it? Share your thoughts in the comments!

And don’t forget to use our Baby Name Finder on your own baby name hunt, or share your baby name dilemmas with me at lamilbrand@gmail.com.

Our Favorite Celebrity Babies of the Year
Our Favorite Celebrity Babies of the Year
Our Favorite Celebrity Babies of the Year

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