Posts Tagged ‘ baby name dilemma ’

Baby Name Dilemma: A Boys’ Name With 4 Syllables, 8 Letters

Thursday, October 23rd, 2014

Reader Tracy is really specific about the kind of name she wants for her son:

I was wondering if you could help with any suggestions for a 4-syllable boy name. This is my 6th baby and I am truly at a loss this time! My oldest 3 children all have 3-syllable, 7 letter names (Breanna, Cassidy, and Zachary) and my youngest 2 have 4-syllable, 8 letter names (Monterio and Giavonna). I would love for this little guy to have a 4-syllable, 8 letter name but I haven’t been very successful in my search. I don’t want a common name but I don’t want anything too outlandish either! If you could help with any suggestions, I would be grateful!

These parameters present a pretty interesting challenge—especially as so many boys’ names are shorter. (I think eight letters and four syllables would be much simpler for a girl.)

Just like your son Monterio, look at names that end with that “o” at the end—they’re becoming red hot in their two-syllable forms, like Milo and Arlo, so the four syllables will be a bit of a twist. I like Benvolio, Demetrio, Pacifico, Fiorello and Annunzio, but my favorite with your baby name mix is Oliviero, which is an international take on Oliver.

Another option is the Roman name trend, shown in shorter names like Augustus and Magnus. I’d pick Aurelius or Ignatius—or try Octavius or Octavian.

Two other names to consider—Jeremiah, a Biblical name with lots of weight behind it, and Ebenezer, which is starting to come back after a long time of being associated with fictional miser Ebenezer Scrooge. (I love the Eben nickname with that one.)

Okay readers: What do you have for Tracy? Share your favorites in the comments.

If you’re still looking for the perfect baby name, check out our Baby Name Finder, or email your dilemma to me at lamilbrand@gmail.com to get personalized baby name advice. And don’t forget to like In Name Only on Facebook to keep up with the very latest in baby names.

Spanish Baby Names
Spanish Baby Names
Spanish Baby Names

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Baby Name Dilemma: A Name for a Twin

Monday, September 1st, 2014

It can be hard to find two names you love when you have twins on the way! That’s reader Stephanie’s dilemma:

My twins are due in October – a boy and a girl, and we have chosen Violet Kathryn for the girl’s name, but are at a loss of a boy’s name. We would like the middle name Joseph to honor a family member, but we haven’t fallen in love with any boy’s names! They will be joining big brothers Kieran Anthony and Grayson Alexander, and I want to find a boy name that pairs well with his bigger siblings as well as his sister. Any suggestions are welcome!

Finding the name for a third boy (who is also part of boy-girl twins) can be tricky. I like the idea of continuing your “ending in n” theme you have going on with the older boys, but I’d like to work that “v” in, to tie it in with his sister’s names.

I have a few favorites that could work in that area: My top choice is Gavin, a top 50 name that has a lovely meaning—white hawk—and was a knight of the Round Table. It’s similar in popularity to the other names you’ve used, and shares the two-syllable structure of your other boys’ names. If Gavin isn’t working for you, try Vaughn, a Welsh name that means “little,” and is currently just inside the top 1000 baby names. (If you’d rather make it more modern and sleek, try Von, a Norse name that means hope.)

The danger, of course, is choosing a name that’s too similar to Kieran or Grayson. I like Declan or Deacon, which add that hard “k” sound in the middle, to help this name stand out from the others in the sibling set. Or go in the other direction, with softer names that don’t have the hard Ks or Gs—names like Owen and Lennon. Other two-syllable names that aren’t quite as well known as the Aiden/Brayden/Jayden crew—and I think have a touch of cool—would be Alden, Edwin, Winston and Tristan.

You could also go with a name that ends in “T,” to link your son with his sister. I like August, Barrett, Dermot, Everett, Prescott, and Rupert. (Rupert’s my absolute favorite of these, but I love Violet and Everett as a sibling set!)

Okay, readers, your turn! What should Stephanie name baby boy #3? Share your thoughts in the comments. And if you have a great baby name dilemma, send it my way at lamilbrand@gmail.com, and you could see it answered here. Do your own baby name spelunking with our Baby Name Finder, and keep up with the very latest in baby names by liking In Name Only on Facebook.

Baby Names: How To Name Twins and Multiples
Baby Names: How To Name Twins and Multiples
Baby Names: How To Name Twins and Multiples

 

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Baby Name Dilemma: An Italian Boys’ Name, No “O” Please

Wednesday, July 30th, 2014

Lots of great dilemmas in my inbox! Reader Lisa has an exciting challenge (and a short timeframe—hope we get this help to you in time):

My husband and I are really stuck for a name for our Baby Boy #3. We used our two “dream” names for our first two sons, Julian and Anthony, and now can’t think of a 3rd name that will fit with all our criteria.

In our case, both our other sons’ names are Latin-based and fit with our last name, a very Italian-sounding Molinaro. So we’d like our third pick to work with our last name as well, however I have huge reservations about making the whole name sound “super-Italian” as I call it. In addition, I’d like the 3rd name to fit with our first two, so for example: Julian, Anthony, and Billy, wouldn’t go together in my opinion. To complicate matters further, I’m a teacher, so I’m turned off of a number of names, and my husband and I just can’t seem to agree. Here’s where an unbiased 3rd party, such as yourself, could be helpful.

Some other “would-be-nice” criteria for the name include:
– also 3 syllables
– is more of a classic name, rather than a hot-right-now name
– doesn’t end in an “O” – i.e – Franco, Juliano, etc.

I’m immediately thinking of the old-school Latin “us” names, which have become so hot lately. Some picks I love: Augustus, Atticus, Darius and Magnus, which are up-and-comers, but not yet everywhere. (I especially love Augustus, which may eventually be on an upswing thanks to the book/movie The Fault in Our Stars, but is currently just inside the top 700.)

There are a couple of names that have a stronger Italian connotation, but I like with your other picks. Have you considered Dante, Dominic or Salvatore?

And finally, a few options that also come from Latin, but don’t end in “us.” I like Francis, Felix, and Maximilian. (Max Molinaro just sounds pretty great to me!)

So help Lisa out: What other names go with Anthony and Julian? Share your favorites in the comments!

If you’re looking for a great name, start your hunt with our Baby Name Finder, and send along your dilemmas to me at lamilbrand@gmail.com. And don’t forget to like In Name Only on Facebook to keep up with the very latest in baby names.

Baby Names: Avoid Baby Naming Regret
Baby Names: Avoid Baby Naming Regret
Baby Names: Avoid Baby Naming Regret

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Baby Name Dilemma: A Middle Name Beginning With J

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2014

We’ve had a TON of great reader questions lately—and so I’m hoping to get through a lot of them this week. We’re kicking it off with reader Mandy, who needs a little help with a middle name:

I’m wondering if you could help me come up with a middle name for Maeve, preferably one that starts with the letter J.

Maeve is one of my favorite go-to middle name choices, and I LOVE the idea of putting it in the starring role. With a short-and-sweet name like Maeve, you need a middle name that’s a little longer—so we have to discount common middles like Jane, June, Jade and James (yes, that works for a girl!). But there are still some really intriguing options out there for you.

I absolutely LOVE the thought of pairing Maeve with Josephine. It’s a feminization of Joseph and means “Jehovah increases.” There are plenty of cool historical/literary figures with the name, including Napoleon’s wife, Empress Josephine, singer/actor Josephine Baker, and of course, Josephine March, the heroine of Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women.

Another name with great literary chops and a nice pairing option with Maeve is Juliet, the female part of Shakespeare’s famous star-crossed lovers. It means “youthful.”

A few other options for you: I love the two nature names Juniper (a berry-producing tree that is the source of gin), and Jasper, the precious stone (this name is usually reserved for guys, but I kind of like the sound of Maeve Jasper). And then there’s Jolie, a French name that means pretty.

If you want to move beyond the Js, there are a few other names I’d love paired with Maeve. Try the “J” sounding Gs, like Genevieve, Giada and Georgia, or some hard “C” names, like Clementine, Clara or Caroline.

What other “J” names do you like, readers? Or are there any other names you’d like to see paired with Maeve?

If you’re looking for a little advice for your baby’s name, don’t be shy. You can email me at lamilbrand@gmail.com, or study names on your own with our Baby Name Finder. And don’t forget to like In Name Only to keep up with the very latest in baby names!

Irish Baby Names
Irish Baby Names
Irish Baby Names

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Celebrities Have Baby Name Dilemmas, Too!

Thursday, July 17th, 2014

Stars—they’re just like us! And when it comes to baby names, they often have the same issues and quandaries we all do.

For instance, people always seem to have the perfect baby name lined up for the first baby—but for the kiddos after that, it can be harder to find a baby name that they love as much (or that they both agree on). That’s apparently an issue for Kristen Bell and Dax Shepard, who found and loved the name Lincoln for their oldest daughter. But according to People, the pair are stumped when it comes to baby #2. Do you think they’ll follow the latest trend and give their new baby a name out of Frozen? Given that they picked one name to use for a boy or a girl, I’m guessing they’ll go with something else intriguingly unisex. (That way, they only have to come up with one good name!)

And while celebrities are often mocked for coming up with out-there baby names (hello, Audio Science and Pilot Inspektor), sometimes they inadvertently almost give their kid a bad name, simply by not checking for weird pronunciation issues or awful monograms. For instance, actor Poppy Montgomery (currently pregnant with baby #3) nearly gave her son the name Jack—a perfectly respectable and normal baby name. But not if you really listen to it, when it’s paired with her husband’s surname, Kaufman. Her new rule: Say it 3 times fast and see if there’s something embarrassing that happens (that’s when she discovered why Jack Kaufman doesn’t work). That’s great advice for any parent! And think about nicknames that come from the name, too—you don’t want to give your kid the name Richard Head, for instance.

If you have a baby name dilemma, don’t be shy—share it with me at lamilbrand@gmail.com. You’ll find great baby name ideas with our Baby Name Finder. And don’t forget to like In Name Only to keep up with the very latest in baby names.

Baby Names: How to Pick a Great Name
Baby Names: How to Pick a Great Name
Baby Names: How to Pick a Great Name

Image: Kristen Bell by Featureflash / Shutterstock.com

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