Archive for the ‘ Baby Name Help ’ Category

Baby Name Advice: Should We Keep Following Our Tradition?

Tuesday, April 21st, 2015

Reader Amy started a baby name trend with her first three daughters—should she keep it going? She writes,

We are expecting our fourth girl. Our older girls are name Madison Reagan and Cailyn. We originally thought we HAD to go with a name that ended with an N or n-sound, so we had Kathryn Lauren and Laine on our list. We were struggling and felt that we were limiting ourselves, so we decided to simply go with a name we both liked regardless of whether or not it ended with an N. Well, 2 months later we are still struggling. I love the name Emma Kathryn. My husband likes it, but feels it is too popular and that we would be “settling” for that name for lack of finding something else. We also like the name Harper, but again we worry about the popularity. It seems there is a lot of pressure these days to pick a name that is not too common/too popular. However, I hate to dismiss names we like just because they’ve been used “a lot.” I also worry that picking a name that doesn’t end with N will seem odd to people at this point or that this baby’s name won’t flow well with her sisters’. Any suggestions or advice? Our baby is due at the end of June and I’m starting to worry we’ll just have to simply pick something from our list and might have naming regret later.

Amy, relax! No matter which way you go with the name, as long as it’s one that you love, you’re golden. So if you can’t find a “n” name that resonates for you, or all the names in your top 10 are in the overall top 10, it’ll be just fine. (And I think both Harper and Emma are lovely choices for daughter #4.)

I hate to see people who start out picking all “J” names or all nature names feel trapped by their decision when they get to later sons and daughters, and they can’t quite muster up the same enthusiasm for the names that remain. So don’t feel saddled by the “n” factor. Your daughter won’t mind.

If you’d like to stick with the “n” names, here are a few more offbeat choices that fit nicely with the baby names you picked for your older daughters. Consider some of the lyn/line names that have started climbing to the top of the charts. I adore Clementine, Evelyn, Madeline, Emmeline, Adeline and Evangeline. (Of these five, I think Evelyn makes the nicest addition to the sibset, but Emmeline would be a nice way to get your pick Emma in but still follow your name tradition.) If you’re into nature names, Wren, Fern and Aspen could all be possibilities. And don’t discount some of the cooler unisex names, like Rowan, Quinn, Sloan, Arden, Cameron and Emerson. (I’m liking the idea of Emerson or Cameron, both of which share a lot of the same consonants as the big-sister names, so they’ll flow nicely.) And of course, I can’t help but recommend the birth month. I like June for its vintage vibe.

Related: 6 Steps to Picking the Perfect Baby Name

And if you don’t want to go with “n?” Well, the world is your oyster! Since most of your name picks are more unisex in nature, I’d go with names like Avery, Parker and Marlowe, which share the same vibe. Along the lines of Emma, consider Amelia, the slightly less popular variant, or the celeb-worthy Mila.

Okay, readers, your turn. What should Amy consider for her fourth daughter? And if you were in her shoes, would you continue that “n” trend, or go your own way?

If you’re looking for the perfect baby name, check out our Baby Name Finder, or email me at lamilbrand@gmail.com for advice. (You could find your question answered here!) And don’t forget to like In Name Only on Facebook to keep up with the very latest in baby names!

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Baby Names: Avoid Baby Naming Regret
Baby Names: Avoid Baby Naming Regret
Baby Names: Avoid Baby Naming Regret

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Baby Name Dilemma: A Unique Pick for a Girl

Friday, March 13th, 2015

Baby Names for GirlsReader Jenn will be having a baby girl in a few months, but can’t decide on a name.

I am 6 1/2 months pregnant with a girl. I would really like to give her a unique but not too far off the wall name. I like unisex or almost boy names that can now be girl names like Braxton, Maxwell, etc. I also like vintage names. I’m just having a really hard time coming up with something different and meaningful.

I can totally understand the urge to have something different and meaningful, and not the typical Olivia, Sophia, and top 10 crew. Here are a few suggestions I have:

I’m loving some of the cool old-school floral and nature names for girls. Names like Juniper, Hazel, Clementine, Flora (or even Florence), or even fresh flowers like Poppy and Iris make beautiful options for a baby girl. Some of them are on their way up, but still aren’t quite as well known as ones like Willow, Violet, and Sage.

Or consider some of the vintage British names that are coming into vogue there, but still aren’t heard too often across the pond. I’m thinking Imogen, Isla, and Eleanor.

And then, there’s always those wonderful unisex baby names. What about considering Winton, Vaughan, Vale, or Laurent for your daughter?

Here are a few suggestions for naming your daughter: I like Winton Jade, Clementine Mae, or Eleanor Laurent.

And here’s where you step in, readers: What names would you suggest for Jenn? I’m sure you guys all have some great ideas!

If you’re looking for the perfect baby name, check out our Baby Name Finder, or email me at lamilbrand@gmail.com for advice. And don’t forget to like In Name Only on Facebook to keep up with the very latest in baby names!

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Baby Names: Is It Too Popular?
Baby Names: Is It Too Popular?
Baby Names: Is It Too Popular?

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Advice on Baby Names: How to Honor Family Members

Thursday, January 15th, 2015

Question markReader Yvonne is looking for baby names for her second daughter. Let’s give her a hand!

I am 17 weeks pregnant with my second girl. I have no idea what I want to name her, besides something that is not on the top rated list! My husband wants the middle name to be in the family but I don’t like any of them—and my husband and my daughter both have very unique names (Jory James and Joryn Marie) and I’d love to continue down that road. My name is Yvonne Yvette. The other family names are Debbie, Mary Lou, Lucy, Olga, Thelma and Marie. And I’m not a fan. The only names we’ve thought of were Sloan and Cora or Kora. Any suggestions would greatly help!

 

I love the idea of honoring family members with the middle name—but you don’t have to use the exact name to honor them. Mary’s siblings could include Marit, Molly, Maribel or Marin. Honor Thelma with a Thea, Debbie with a Devra or Devora, Lucy with Luz, Luca, or Lucinda. Maeve would be a nice combination of Mary and your name, Yvette. And James has been popping up as an unexpected middle name for girls—why not honor Dad?I do like the baby names Sloan and Cora—Cora in particular. I think Cora Maeve or Cora Lucinda would be lovely. If you’re looking for other unique names in the Sloan/Cora vein, consider Jovie, Vienne, Clea, Ione, Lilou (which would honor your Mary Lou), Cerise, Chiara, Oceane, and Sidra.My baby name pick for daughter #2? I’d go with Cora Maeve, Vienne James, or Lilou Eve. Okay readers, share your baby name advice! What other suggestions do you have for Yvonne?

 

If you’re still looking for the perfect baby name, check out our Baby Name Finder, or email me at lamilbrand@gmail.com to get personalized advice. And don’t forget to like In Name Only on Facebook for the very latest in baby names!

Baby Names: Is It Too Popular?
Baby Names: Is It Too Popular?
Baby Names: Is It Too Popular?

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Baby Name Dilemma: A Boys’ Name With 4 Syllables, 8 Letters

Thursday, October 23rd, 2014

Reader Tracy is really specific about the kind of name she wants for her son:

I was wondering if you could help with any suggestions for a 4-syllable boy name. This is my 6th baby and I am truly at a loss this time! My oldest 3 children all have 3-syllable, 7 letter names (Breanna, Cassidy, and Zachary) and my youngest 2 have 4-syllable, 8 letter names (Monterio and Giavonna). I would love for this little guy to have a 4-syllable, 8 letter name but I haven’t been very successful in my search. I don’t want a common name but I don’t want anything too outlandish either! If you could help with any suggestions, I would be grateful!

These parameters present a pretty interesting challenge—especially as so many boys’ names are shorter. (I think eight letters and four syllables would be much simpler for a girl.)

Just like your son Monterio, look at names that end with that “o” at the end—they’re becoming red hot in their two-syllable forms, like Milo and Arlo, so the four syllables will be a bit of a twist. I like Benvolio, Demetrio, Pacifico, Fiorello and Annunzio, but my favorite with your baby name mix is Oliviero, which is an international take on Oliver.

Another option is the Roman name trend, shown in shorter names like Augustus and Magnus. I’d pick Aurelius or Ignatius—or try Octavius or Octavian.

Two other names to consider—Jeremiah, a Biblical name with lots of weight behind it, and Ebenezer, which is starting to come back after a long time of being associated with fictional miser Ebenezer Scrooge. (I love the Eben nickname with that one.)

Okay readers: What do you have for Tracy? Share your favorites in the comments.

If you’re still looking for the perfect baby name, check out our Baby Name Finder, or email your dilemma to me at lamilbrand@gmail.com to get personalized baby name advice. And don’t forget to like In Name Only on Facebook to keep up with the very latest in baby names.

Spanish Baby Names
Spanish Baby Names
Spanish Baby Names

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Should You Be Able to Create a Last Name for Your Baby?

Wednesday, September 17th, 2014

That’s the battle the Sabr family is facing with the state of Tennessee. Parents Kim Sarubbi and Carl Abramson decided to give their kids a name built from parts of theirs: Combining the Sar and the Abr from the beginning of their surnames to make Sabr. Their plan worked out fine for the two kids who were born in California, but apparently, their new son who was born in Tennessee isn’t so lucky: His birth certificate was returned with a big red line through Sabr. And they’re supposed to either pick one of their surnames for their son, give him both surnames—or pay $150 to change his name to whatever they want.

But the couple is opting for none of the above, and intends to take their fight to court, to help prevent this from happening to other name mashers.

(For the record, Tennessee seems to be a very tough place for baby-naming freedom—this is also where a judge denied one mom the right to give her son the name Messiah.)

Personally, I’d just pay the $150 and be done with it. (Or I’d just do what I did, and give my daughters my husband’s last name, and just keep my maiden name. Done!)

But I’m intrigued about what you think: Did you give much thought to which surname you’d give your baby? Did you follow tradition and give your baby his/her father’s surname, give your baby a hyphenated last name, or choose yours? And would you ever consider creating a mashup surname like the Sabrs?

If you’re still looking for the perfect baby name, try our Baby Name Finder, or get personalized advice by emailing your issue at lamilbrand@gmail.com. And don’t forget to like In Name Only to keep up with the very latest in baby names!

Baby Names: Avoid Baby Naming Regret
Baby Names: Avoid Baby Naming Regret
Baby Names: Avoid Baby Naming Regret

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