Charlotte Elizabeth Diana: The Meaning Behind the Royal Baby Name

As pretty much everyone in the world now knows, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge (AKA Kate Middleton and Prince William) welcomed a royal baby girl early May 2nd. But now we know that they gave their daughter a baby name befitting a princess (and those betting that it’d be Chardonnay were sorely disappointed). So let’s get the scoop behind this very traditional and sentimental baby name choice: Charlotte Elizabeth Diana.

Charlotte is an old-school royal name—there was a Queen Charlotte in England during the late 18th century, and it also pays homage to the new princess’s grandpa, Prince Charles. Charles is a French name that means “free man,” and it’s very popular here—just outside the top 10 baby names.

Elizabeth is clearly a homage to the new princess’s great grandmother, the current Queen Elizabeth II (and also goes back to one of the grandest queens in royal history). It’s a perennial top 20 favorite here in the U.S., with Biblical roots and a slew of great nicknames.

Diana is clearly picked to pay honor to the Prince’s late mother, the popular Princess Diana. It’s a lovely name connected to the Roman goddess of the moon, and means “divine.” It’s currently just inside the top 300 in the U.S.

In all, it’s a lovely and not unexpected mix of baby names for this new princess, ones that perfectly mirrors the picks made for her big brother George.

Tell us: What do you think of the royal baby name? Is there anything there you’d pick for your own daughter—or is it too traditional for you?

If you’re still looking for a great name for your heir, check out our lists of names perfect for a princess or prince. And don’t forget to like In Name Only to keep up with the very latest in baby names.

 

Image: Shutterstock.com

British Baby Names
British Baby Names
British Baby Names

Add a Comment

Baby Name Advice: Should We Keep Following Our Tradition?

Reader Amy started a baby name trend with her first three daughters—should she keep it going? She writes,

We are expecting our fourth girl. Our older girls are name Madison Reagan and Cailyn. We originally thought we HAD to go with a name that ended with an N or n-sound, so we had Kathryn Lauren and Laine on our list. We were struggling and felt that we were limiting ourselves, so we decided to simply go with a name we both liked regardless of whether or not it ended with an N. Well, 2 months later we are still struggling. I love the name Emma Kathryn. My husband likes it, but feels it is too popular and that we would be “settling” for that name for lack of finding something else. We also like the name Harper, but again we worry about the popularity. It seems there is a lot of pressure these days to pick a name that is not too common/too popular. However, I hate to dismiss names we like just because they’ve been used “a lot.” I also worry that picking a name that doesn’t end with N will seem odd to people at this point or that this baby’s name won’t flow well with her sisters’. Any suggestions or advice? Our baby is due at the end of June and I’m starting to worry we’ll just have to simply pick something from our list and might have naming regret later.

Amy, relax! No matter which way you go with the name, as long as it’s one that you love, you’re golden. So if you can’t find a “n” name that resonates for you, or all the names in your top 10 are in the overall top 10, it’ll be just fine. (And I think both Harper and Emma are lovely choices for daughter #4.)

I hate to see people who start out picking all “J” names or all nature names feel trapped by their decision when they get to later sons and daughters, and they can’t quite muster up the same enthusiasm for the names that remain. So don’t feel saddled by the “n” factor. Your daughter won’t mind.

If you’d like to stick with the “n” names, here are a few more offbeat choices that fit nicely with the baby names you picked for your older daughters. Consider some of the lyn/line names that have started climbing to the top of the charts. I adore Clementine, Evelyn, Madeline, Emmeline, Adeline and Evangeline. (Of these five, I think Evelyn makes the nicest addition to the sibset, but Emmeline would be a nice way to get your pick Emma in but still follow your name tradition.) If you’re into nature names, Wren, Fern and Aspen could all be possibilities. And don’t discount some of the cooler unisex names, like Rowan, Quinn, Sloan, Arden, Cameron and Emerson. (I’m liking the idea of Emerson or Cameron, both of which share a lot of the same consonants as the big-sister names, so they’ll flow nicely.) And of course, I can’t help but recommend the birth month. I like June for its vintage vibe.

Related: 6 Steps to Picking the Perfect Baby Name

And if you don’t want to go with “n?” Well, the world is your oyster! Since most of your name picks are more unisex in nature, I’d go with names like Avery, Parker and Marlowe, which share the same vibe. Along the lines of Emma, consider Amelia, the slightly less popular variant, or the celeb-worthy Mila.

Okay, readers, your turn. What should Amy consider for her fourth daughter? And if you were in her shoes, would you continue that “n” trend, or go your own way?

If you’re looking for the perfect baby name, check out our Baby Name Finder, or email me at lamilbrand@gmail.com for advice. (You could find your question answered here!) And don’t forget to like In Name Only on Facebook to keep up with the very latest in baby names!

Image: Shutterstock.com

Baby Names: Avoid Baby Naming Regret
Baby Names: Avoid Baby Naming Regret
Baby Names: Avoid Baby Naming Regret

Add a Comment

Get the Scoop on Jill Duggar Dillard’s Baby Name!

Jill Duggar Dillard and husband Derick Dillard didn’t follow in her 19 Kids and Counting family’s “J” baby name footsteps. Her first son, who was born last night, was given the name Israel David!

Israel is a place name, of course, but before it became the name of the Middle Eastern country, it was a common boys’ name that means “he who struggles with God.” In the Old Testament, God gave Jacob that name after he tangled with an angel. It’s been in the top 500 baby names in the U.S. since the 1960s.

David is a timeless pick, and given the family’s devout religious faith, it’s not too surprising that it’s another Biblical name. David means beloved, and has been in the top 50 for the past century and a half. There are numerous namesakes, including the Old Testament king, rock legend David Bowie, and the protagonist of Charles’ Dickens’ classic David Copperfield, just to mention a few.

All in all, Israel David is a name that speaks to their family’s strong religious traditions, and gives them plenty of room to pick lots of other “I” names, if they choose to follow the family tradition of giving all of their kids the same first initial. (I’m loving the idea of Israel coupled with Isadora and Ignatius!)

Tell us: What do you think of the name Israel David? Are either of those picks on your short list?

If you’re looking for the perfect baby name, check out our Baby Name Finder, or email me at lamilbrand@gmail.com for advice. (You could find your question answered here!) And don’t forget to like In Name Only on Facebook to keep up with the very latest in baby names!

Image: Derick and Jill Dillard/Facebook

Christian Baby Names
Christian Baby Names
Christian Baby Names

Add a Comment

‘Mad Men’ Baby Names: What’s in Vogue, What’s Not?

Mad Men‘s final season started last night. But even if the show brought ’60s cocktails and fashions back into vogue, it hasn’t exactly done the same for baby names. (When’s the last time you met a new baby named Don?) Here’s the scoop on what hit (and what didn’t) from the show:

Don Don Draper rises from a dark and troubled past to become a partner in his own advertising agency, but left behind a broken marriage, three kids and lots of other trouble in his wake. (FYI—the current Don actually took his name from a Korean War buddy who died near him. His real name was Richard.) Donald is a Scottish name that means chief, and has been on a slow decline in popularity since the 1950s.

Betty This short form of Elizabeth was ubercommon in this era—and was given to Don Draper’s first wife and mother of his children. While Betty itself is rarely heard on the playground, Elizabeth is still a top 20 favorite. You may want to consider a more stylish nickname, like Eliza, Lizzy, or Beth.

Peggy Copywriter Peggy Olson also rose through the ranks from the secretarial pool—and engaged in some Don Draperesque behavior in her personal life. Her name is a vintage nickname for the classic Margaret. Peggy hasn’t yet made a comeback, but there’s a slew of nicknames for Margaret that are popular, including Maggie, Maisie, May, Greta, and Daisy.

Pete Pete Campbell probably has one of the most timeless names on the show, thanks to its association with the popular saint. Peter means “rock,” and is currently hovering near the top 200.

Joan Joan started out in the secretarial pool, before being elevated to partner at Don Draper’s new agency. Joan is a female variant on John and shares its meaning (“God is gracious”) but not its popularity—it dropped out of the top 1000 in the early 1990s.

Sally Don and Betty’s daughter scores this nickname for Sarah that shares its meaning, princess. Sally fell out of the top 1000 in the 1990s, after a long reign near the top.

Roger Roger Sterling was head of Sterling Cooper and the later agency, Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce. His name, currently in the top 600, means warrior.

Megan This Welsh variant of Margaret shares its meaning, pearl. It’s the name of Don’s second wife, a former junior copywriter at the firm and aspiring actress. Megan was actually up and coming during the 1950s and 1960s, and hit its peak in the 1990s. It’s currently still in the top 200.

Tell us: Which of these baby names do you think have a shot of coming back into style? And would you name your baby any of them?

If you’re looking for the perfect baby name, check out our Baby Name Finder, or email me at lamilbrand@gmail.com for advice. (You could find your question answered here!) And don’t forget to like In Name Only on Facebook to keep up with the very latest in baby names!

Baby Names: Avoid Baby Naming Regret
Baby Names: Avoid Baby Naming Regret
Baby Names: Avoid Baby Naming Regret

Image via AMC/Facebook

Add a Comment

All About the Boy’s Baby Name Milla Jovovich Picked—for Her Girl!

It’s a girl for model/actress Milla Jovovich and husband Paul W.S. Anderson—and for their second daughter, they chose to follow the latest celeb trend of giving their daughter a baby name that’s been traditionally used for boys. Joining big sister Ever Gabo is baby sister Dashiel Edon. (And that’s a much better baby name than the one Ever suggested for her little sister—Toilet Bowl!)

Dashiel is a unique spelling for Dashiell, a British take on the French surname de Chiel. It’s been picked by a slew of celebrities for their sons—actors Cate Blanchett and Jason Priestley, and rocker Alice Cooper. It comes with a couple of nicknames, including the stylish Dash and the more staid Shelly. It hasn’t been a top 1000 choice for either boys or girls.

The middle name they chose, Edon, appears to be an alternative spelling of Aidan, though it could also be a variant of the more girly Eden. Depending on which name it originated from, Edon either means little fire or paradise.

It’s definitely not a common choice for a girl—though Dashiel feels a little bit more feminine than some of the other baby names celebs have co-opted (hello, James!). What do you think of it?

And what do you think of the trend of using boys’ names for girls? Are there any boys’ names you think should be “off-limits” to girls? And would you consider following this trend with your own child?

If you’re looking for the perfect baby name, check out our Baby Name Finder, or email me at lamilbrand@gmail.com for advice. (You could find your question answered here!) And don’t forget to like In Name Only on Facebook to keep up with the very latest in baby names!

Image: Shutterstock.com

Baby Names: Is It Too Unusual?
Baby Names: Is It Too Unusual?
Baby Names: Is It Too Unusual?

Add a Comment