Posts Tagged ‘ dinosaur unit ’

Feathered Dinosaurs

Saturday, August 11th, 2012

This might be of interest to the dinosaur-loving tots (and parents!) out there. This news from last month passed me by until a couple of days ago. Did you hear that a new species of feathered dinosaur was discovered in Bavaria, in Southern Germany? The fossil of a Sciurumimus albersdoerferi, a carnivorous dinosaur that lived about 150 million years ago in the late Jurassic period shows the first evidence of feathered theropod dinosaurs that are not closely related to birds. The fossil shows plumage at the base of the tail and on other parts of the body. There’s evidence that the whole body was covered with feathers.

Skeleton of Sciurumimus as found on a limestone slab

Photo Credit: H. Tischlinger\Jura Museum Eichstätt

In recent years there has been evidence of feathering in other dinosaurs classified as coelurosaurs, most of which were close relatives of birds. This is the first evidence found in the dinosaurs classified as megalosaurs. This suggests that all predatory dinosaurs had feathers.

The fossil that was found (a juvenile) was about 28 inches in length, but the adult megalosaurs could reach up to 20 feet in length.

You can read more at the American Museum of Natural History: Newly Discovered Dinosaur Implies Greater Prevalence of Feathers.

Imagine all the new feathered dinosaur crafts that are on the horizon!!

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