3 More Quick EggSperiments: How strong is that egg? (Part 2 of 4)

EggSperiment 1: Why do eggs move the way they do?

Have the kids roll an egg around on a table. Talk about why they are shaped the way they are.

 Because eggs are a funny and oblong shape, they roll and wobble around in a certain way. Eggs wobble when they roll so they won’t go far from a mother hen and they will stay inside of a nest.  If eggs were round, they would probably roll out of nests or too far away from the mother hen.

Egg Activity #2: Why are eggs shaped the way they are?

Place an egg in the middle of your palm. Squeeze as hard as you can. Can you break it?

 

LD was certain he would be able to crack his egg immediately. He was shocked when he couldn’t and begged to be allowed to throw the egg on the ground instead!

The arch is one of the strongest architectural shapes and similarly, the ovoid shape gives an egg its incredible strength!

If you look at the roof of the Pantheon (in Rome) it is shaped like an egg. It has survived for more than 2,000 years. That’s because when weight is applied, no single point in the dome supports the entire weight. Instead, the object’s weight is carried down along the curved walls to the dome’s base.

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Egg Activity #3: So if eggs are so strong, can you stand on them? Try it!

If you’re careful you can! But of course, if the egg breaks it’s probably because you applied greater pressure to the shell than it could bear!

Just so you know, I had to lift the kids up slightly and have them set their feet down rather than “walking” along the egg. We didn’t have enough eggs on hand to chance them all smashing before the third person had a chance. And yes, the eggs were raw not hard-boiled!

Did you miss the first post in this series?

Coming at the end of this series… the free EggSperiment Pack:

Do you an your kids like science experiments? You might enjoy these posts. You’ll find free Science Experiment Packs that you can download there as well.

Be sure to come visit us at the Homeschool Den Facebook Page where you can quickly browse through all our latest posts.

 

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Science Egg-speriments! Just in Time for Easter! (Part 1 of 4)

EggSpect the UnEggSpected with this series of fun Science EggSperiments! In this series you’ll find a dozen terrific egg activities to do with you kids. So… for the first EggSperiment…

Because Easter is coming up, we devoted the past week to some fun science EggSperiments.

This experiments requires you to soak a raw egg for two days in vinegar, so I’ll share this experiment first so you have time to get it ready for your kids!

We soaked 3 eggs in vinegar so each of my kids had an egg to work with:

When the eggs are ready, gently remove them from the vinegar. The egg will feel very rubbery and pliable! We used old baby food jars for this experiment.  Make sure that you don’t press on the egg to hard or the membrane will burst.  Both ED and DD’s eggs broke within the first five minutes:

LD was having better luck.  We decided to start over again with his egg because he stopped making progress. We ran the baby food jar under hot water and placed the egg on top. Then we packed some frozen veggies around the outside since cool air contracts. That seemed to do the trick. Slowly, agonizingly slowly, the egg began to work its way down into the baby food jar!

The more he worked with the egg, the more of the shell came off leaving behind just the membrane between success and disaster!  We shouted with joy when the egg made it into the jar without breaking!

We have another dozen EggSperiments to share with you… and I’m almost done putting them together into a printable pack. I shared that at the end of this series.

In the meantime, start soaking your eggs in vinegar and buy two or three dozen eggs to be prepared for more Egg Activities! You’ll need some hard boiled eggs as well.  We’ll see you back for three more EggSperiments tomorrow!

Other posts in this series:

Do you an your kids like science experiments? You might enjoy these posts. You’ll find free Science Experiment Packs that you can download there as well.

Be sure to come visit us at the Homeschool Den Facebook Page where you can quickly browse through all our latest posts.

Find cool crafts you and the kids can do at home with our activity finder!

Easter Chicken and String Egg
Easter Chicken and String Egg
Easter Chicken and String Egg

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Free Math Pages: Percents – Fractions – Decimals

LD is starting a unit on percents.  I explained that percent means “per hundred” or “of a hundred.”  We started with these free sheets from worksheet fun that have some of the blocks in a hundred squared shaded in. It was easy to see that 84% was 84 of a hundred…


The next day I had him do these worksheets that I made, which helped him see the relationship between fraction, decimals and percents. (There are three pages.) He understood immediately when he divided the block in half… that each half was 50%… (or into quarters and each 1/4=25%).

Click here to download the free fraction, decimal, percent math pages:

We then used this similar sheet from teaching image the next day: 

I looked everywhere for some free percent-decimal-fraction cards so we could play some games.  I didn’t want to spend the time making cards if I could find them free out on the Internet. I found this printable by Raft (Resource Area for Teaching) Bay Area. The great thing is that they are made to print out onto 4×1 labels… so all we had to do was cut them out and stick them onto index card. Clever!

From there we’ll use some other free resources we found on the web…LD hasn’t gotten to those yet, so I’ll have to add a part 2 in another week or so. :)

Come visit us at the Homeschool Den Facebook Page to see some of the posts (and freebies!) you may have missed.

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Preschool at Home: More Geography Activities

Yesterday, I shared a lot of activities that you can do with maps.  Today I want to share some other geography activities that my kids loved.

After reading through Me on the Map (which is just perfect for the 4-6 year old crowd), I had ED do an activity that focuses in on where we live.  You have the kids color in and paste their location, pinpointing their location by going from the largest to the smallest location. For example… I printed out labels such as I live on Earth, I live in North America…

I cut out circles for

  • the Earth
  • North America
  • USA
  • Your state: Kansas
  • City: Topeka
  • Street: 77 Maple Street
She colored in the maps and glued them onto the circles with the labels at the bottom:
Then you put the entire collection together (largest at the bottom) with a brad at the top:
In the past we did variations of this activity using stacking boxes instead. This post from several years ago was Nesting Boxes from the Galaxy to the Atom — and has a similar idea…
Here’s a close-up
We also sang through the song about the 7 continents and ED put in pins on our world map:
Here are the kids singing the Seven Continent Song. Last spring someone wondered if we could share the tune–so we made our first you-tube video.  We had a number of bloopers and flubs (which made us roll on the floor laughing), but this version went fairly well! So… here are the kids in their very first you-tube video!


If you want to print out and make your own Montessori materials, here are the posts where you’ll find those free downloads…

You’ll find the free Montessori World Map here (free to download over at that post) and instructions on how to make a Montessori pin map:

You might want to visit the post about the Animals Around the World. You can access free Montessori cards of animals from each continent at that post:

Don’t miss this post about using the free Montessori US landmark cards I made (Grand Canyon, Statue of Liberty, etc.) and how we used them.

Other related posts you might be interested in:

Categories you may want to visit (which have posts related to these topics):

Free and Useful Montessori Resources:

  • Living Montessori Now – This website has a wonderful collection of how parents are instituting Montessori inspired activities in their homes.
  • ETC Montessori – Free Downloadable Materials
  • Montessori Mom – This wonderful website has an extensive list of various Montessori resources.
  • Montessori Album – A growing site with lots of photos.
  • Montessori Materials – Lots of free resources. I especially love and use the paper purple beads for place value work in math (see “Bead Materials ones and tens, beads: hundreds and thousands. See my post about using these materials here.
  • Montessori for Everyone–Offers free downloads each month–sorting cards such as the seasons, where things come from, animal tracks and more.

Come visit us over at our Homeschool Den Facebook Page! It’s a quick easy way to browse through the past posts you might have missed.

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Preschool at Home: Geography Activities (Maps and More) Ages 4+

There are so many fun things you can do with your preschooler (or elementary kids) to help them gain an understanding of the geography of our amazing world! You can make all kinds of maps to enhance your preschooler’s knowledge of the world.

Over the years we have made maps…

with sand, dirt and grass seed like our Nile River Valley

Out of clay, like our Ancient Greece (and Mediterranean Sea) map  (Ancient Greece Geography ProjectAncient Greece Geography Project, Part 2)

Out of graham crackers, like our map of Britain

and out of cookie dough like our map of South America (with the Andes as chocolate chips!)

You can study and color world flags

And use world flags with pin maps, like we did with the countries of Asia

and with the countries in Africa

You can use geography puzzles:

You can toss a globe around and identify the continent (or country) your thumb lands on when you catch it:

You can study famous landmarks and make replicas

You can locate famous rivers and lakes:

And you can study all the geography land form (and water form) terms like lakes, peninsulas, isthmus, bay and create them at home:

You can make your own world globe!

You can play board games like Ten Days Across Europe (or Africa or Asia)

You can make food from different places… like our almond soup when we tried different foods from Africa

or pretzels from Germany

You can study a specific country and learn all about their history, culture and music like when we studied Japan,  India,

and Australia

You can try to arrange a country box exchange, which we’ve done with homeschoolers from or living in Singapore, France, different states in the U.S.

Country Box Exchange: China

Country Box Exchange: Gambia

Or you could participate in a postcard exchange from around the U.S. or around the world!

Hope you have fun exploring our amazing world!

Other related posts you might be interested in:

Categories you may want to visit (which have posts related to these topics):

Free and Useful Montessori Resources:

  • Living Montessori Now – This website has a wonderful collection of how parents are instituting Montessori inspired activities in their homes.
  • ETC Montessori – Free Downloadable Materials
  • Montessori Mom – This wonderful website has an extensive list of various Montessori resources.
  • Montessori Album – A growing site with lots of photos.
  • Montessori Materials – Lots of free resources. I especially love and use the paper purple beads for place value work in math (see “Bead Materials ones and tens, beads: hundreds and thousands. See my post about using these materials here.
  • Montessori for Everyone–Offers free downloads each month–sorting cards such as the seasons, where things come from, animal tracks and more.

Come visit us over at our Homeschool Den Facebook Page! It’s a quick easy way to browse through the past posts you might have missed.

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