Posts Tagged ‘ working mothers ’

A Day in the Life of a Mom (Pin It!)

Tuesday, July 2nd, 2013

While media reports of “mommy wars” between working mothers and at-home moms rage on, Parents teamed with Quester, a research company in Des Moines, Iowa, to find out what moms really think of one another. Among the findings: 62 percent of survey respondents said that the moms they know are mostly supportive of one another. Perhaps that stems from the common ground that mothers, working or at home, share. Check out some of the most frequently cited terms that came up from moms in our survey when describing their days. (And pin it on Pinterest!) Read the story, “Calling a Truce in the Mommy Wars,” in the August issue of Parents, for more survey results!

mom wars diagram

Add a Comment

Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, May 21st, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Cost of Children’s Health Care Hitting Families Harder
A child’s chronic illness can strain a family emotionally and financially — and children represent the fastest growing health care spending group in America, according to a new report.

Diabetes on the Rise Among Teenagers
A study found a sharp increase in the disease’s prevalence among teens, adding to worries that diabetes may progress more rapidly in children than in adults.

Fewer Girls Completing All Three HPV Shots: Study
Among girls and women who get their first human papillomavirus, or HPV, vaccine, the percent who complete all three doses is dropping, according to a new study.

Stay-at-Home Moms More Depressed than Working Moms, Study Finds
A Gallup survey of 60,000 women found that stay-at-home moms are more likely to have felt depression, sadness, anger and worry than working mothers.

Texas Sextuplets Improving, 3 Breathing on Own
A hospital official says three of the premature sextuplets born last month in Houston are now breathing on their own.

Add a Comment

Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, April 20th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

CDC: 2011 Was Worst Measles Year in U.S. in 15 Years
Last year was the worst year for measles in the U.S. in 15 years, health officials said Thursday.

Birth Defects a Third More Common in IVF Babies
Babies conceived through certain fertility treatment techniques are about one-third more likely to have a birth defect than babies conceived without any extra help from technology, according to a review of several dozen studies.

TV On in the Background? It’s Still Bad for Kids
Too much television can be detrimental for kids’ development, even when they’re not plopped directly in front of the screen.

Domestic Violence May Stunt Babies’ Intellectual Growth
A longitudinal study uncovers the lifelong consequences of child abuse and exposure to interpersonal conflict in the first two years of life.

Controversial Ad Uses Breast-Feeding to Sell Cookies
The latest in the breast-feeding wars comes all the way from South Korea and involves the epitome of American snacktime: the Oreo cookie.

Working Moms’ Challenges: Paid Leave, Child Care
The past week’s political firestorm in the presidential race focused on stay-at-home moms, but two-thirds of women with young children now work. What some feel is being lost in the political debate are the challenges they face in the workplace.

Add a Comment

Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, April 19th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Nurse Accused in Baby Abduction, Mom Death Due in Court
A nurse who had suffered a miscarriage was desperate to find a child, so she went exactly where she knew she could find one: the suburban Houston clinic where she had taken her three children for checkups, authorities say.

Report Estimates 8 Million Children Hurt by Foreclosures
Five years into the foreclosure crisis, an estimated 2.3 million children have lived in homes lost to foreclosure, according to a report from First Focus, a Washington, D.C-based bipartisan advocacy group focused on families.

Think Carrots, Not Candy as School Snack, Group Suggests
Junk food may soon be hard to buy at American public schools as the U.S. government readies new rules requiring healthier foods to be sold beyond the cafeteria – a move most parents support, according to a poll released on Thursday.

Kindergartner Handcuffed, Taken to Police Station After Allegedly Throwing Tantrum — and Furniture
The family of a 6-year-old Georgia girl is upset at police and school officials after the girl was handcuffed and taken to a police station for allegedly throwing furniture, tearing items off the walls and knocking over a shelf, which injured the principal.

New York Girl, 7, Credited With Alerting Parents to House Fire
A 7-year-old New York girl is being hailed as a hero for saving her family by alerting them to a fire that destroyed their home.

Baby Bonus: Aussie Company Doubles New Moms’ Salaries
One of Australia’s biggest companies, Insurance Australia Group, is instituting a new, super-generous maternity policy.

Add a Comment

Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, December 14th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Child Care Subsidies Drop When Families Need Them Most
Federal and state subsidies have taken a hit from budget cuts, forcing parents to find other arrangements to stay employed.

Getting Kids to Eat Veggies Can be Sticky Business
Researchers found that when parents gave their 3- and 4-year-olds a sticker each time they took a “tiny taste” of a disliked vegetable, it gradually changed the preschoolers’ attitude.

ADHD Drugs Safe for Adults’ Hearts, Research Finds
Ritalin and other drugs used to treat attention deficit disorder are safe for adults’ hearts, even though they can increase blood pressure and heart rate, according to the largest study of these medicines in adults.

More Women in Combat Means More Mothers with PTSD
With more female troops in combat, there has been an increase in PTSD diagnoses: One in five female veterans suffer from PTSD, according to the VA.

Mom’s Hug Revives Baby that Was Pronounced Dead
After being told her newborn son was dead, mother Kate Ogg was able to cuddle and caress her baby’s limp body back to life, astonishing doctors.

Why Working Mothers Are Happier and Healthier Than Stay-at-Home Moms
Despite the juggling act required to hold down a job and care for children, moms who work report they’re healthier and happier than moms who stay at home when their kids are babies and preschoolers.

Add a Comment

Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, April 6th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupEstrogen Lowers Breast Cancer and Heart Attack Risk in Some
In a finding that challenges the conventional wisdom about the risks of some hormones used in menopause, a major government study has found that years after using estrogen-only therapy, certain women had a markedly reduced risk of breast cancer and heart attack. (New York Times)

The Great Divide: Working Moms Vs. Childless Women
As significant as the differences are between men and women in most workplaces, the biggest gap is between women with children and those without. Motherhood can be a considerable employment handicap because very few jobs accommodate mothers.  (Psychology Today)

Is this generation as resilient as were children of the Great Depression?
As we were wrapping up the research and interviews on NQA, however, the banks collapsed, the housing crisis hit, and the recession set in. In other words, the world flipped upside down. Newly minted college grads were at the forefront of the blowback: unemployment was hovering at 14% for 18-24 year olds, and the promised jobs that a college degree was supposed to guarantee were nowhere to be found. It was time to head back into the field and find out how they were coping. (Psychology Today)

(more…)

Add a Comment

New Study: Working Parents Too Stressed to Have Sex

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2011

ss_101704105Do working parents have more stress in their lives than non-working parents? While it’s clear that being a stay-at-home mom or dad is certainly no walk in the park, a new national survey from Care.com implies the answer is ”yes.”

 According to the survey, sixty-two percent of working parents revealed they are too stressed from managing their jobs and families to go to the gym, call a friend, or even have sex with their spouses. 

Another key finding? The majority of those surveyed would be willing to trade in a higher paycheck for less responsibility at work. A quarter of working parents (25%) reported that they would leave their current jobs for less or considerably less money if that would provide more flexibility in their lives.

Results go on to show the issue of childcare as a major stress-inducer. With more than a third (34%) of parents relying on their nannies or babysitters to make their lives run smoothly, 62% find that it is stressful to extremely stressful when a childcare crisis, such as a sick nanny or babysitter or a school closing occurs.  And while more than half (58%) of parents have a childcare back-up plan, only ten percent rely on their employers to provide emergency back-up care as a benefit.

Still, the greatest source of stress for the working parents proved to be the difficult task of managing work-life balance.  More than a third of parents – (35 percent) cited work-life as most stressful while a quarter of parents (24%) felt that finding a trusted care provider for their child is more stressful than keeping their relationship with their spouse happy (18.4%) and excelling at their jobs (11.3%).

“While the White House recently announced the great strides of women in the workplace, this survey shows that the work-life balance for so many working parents remains elusive,” said Wendy Sachs, Editor-in-Chief of Care.com.

 “This survey finds that despite successful careers, our work is impacting our personal lives in unhealthy ways.  Working moms, particularly those with young children, are exhausted and stressed by a workday that for many never ends because we are tethered to technology 24/7,” Sachs said.   “It’s no surprise that moms who are toting buzzing BlackBerries in their bags chock full of work emails, can feel tapped out and not eager for sex. Stress kills the libido.”  

What are your thoughts on this survey? Share your opinions along with the biggest sources of stress in your life and how they relate to being a working or stay-at-home parent (SAHP’s should also be considered a ‘working parents’ in my opinion!). 

Note: The Care.com survey was conducted via an online survey at Care.com among 600 adult parents 18 years of age from February 22 – March 1, 2011.

Add a Comment

White House Supports Working Mothers Who Breastfeed

Tuesday, December 21st, 2010

Mothers who want to breastfeed their children at work find that office spaces are rarely conducive to privacy and support.  To make it easier for mothers to transition back to the workplace while maintaining a bond with their babies, the White House Council on Women and Girls announced yesterday that new efforts will be made to support the Affordable Care Act. 

Signed by President Obama on March 23, 2010, the Affordable Care Act requires that employers  provide a private place (other than a bathroom) and a reasonable break time for new moms who need to express milk and nurse their babies for up to one year.

Under the new amendment, the Wage and Hour Division at the Department of Labor will be improving on three things to enforce the ACA:

1- Releasing a Frequently Asked Questions document and a Request for Information.  The former will provide guidelines on how companies can comply with the law while the latter will allow for public comment on the law. 

2- Delegating responsibility to the Director of the Office of Personnel Management to make sure federal agencies are enforcing the Affordable Care Act in companies.

3- Providing a new online breastfeeding resource that will help nursing mothers understand the new amendments to the Affordable Care Act. Visit www.dol.gov/whd/nursingmothers/

The White House would like to encourage companies to support breastfeeding moms because the benefits of breastfeeding include increased workplace productivity, increased company brand reputation and recruitment, increased health benefits for mom and baby (reduced risk of infection, breast cancer, obesity, diabetes, etc.), decreased absenteeism and employee turnover, and increased cost savings on company healthcare.

Read more information about the Affordable Care Act:

Add a Comment