Posts Tagged ‘ vitamins ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, August 3rd, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Breast Cancer Charity Overstated Screening Benefits, Researchers Say
Researchers say Susan G. Komen for the Cure overstated the benefit mammograms have on survival rates of women with breast cancer. Komen’s messages stated 98 percent of women who get the screening tests survive at least five years, while 23 percent who do not get mammograms survive that long — a difference of 75 percentage points. (via NBC News)

New Pets May Help Autistic Kids Socially
Getting a pet may help children with autism to develop their social skills, if the furry friend is brought into the home when the child is about 5 years old, according to a new French study. The researchers discovered the children showed improvement in their abilities to share with others and to offer comfort. (via Fox News)

Hidden Dangers in Vitamins & Supplements?
According to a new report in Consumer Reports, vitamins and supplements could do more harm than good in some cases. Between 2007 and mid-April 2012, the FDA received more than 6,300 reports of serious adverse events linked to dietary supplements, including vitamins and herbs. (via CNN)

Disharmony in the Land of Nod
A new study suggests that even moderate levels of household conflict can alter basic brain function in infants, leaving them hypersensitive to negative emotions. Researchers found chronic family conflict made infants more likely to have abnormal brain responses to angry speech. (via Huffington Post)

Chile Bans Marketing of Toys in Children’s Food
A new law in Chile aims to take some fun out of fast-food by forcing McDonald’s, Burger King, KFC, and other restaurants to stop including toys and other goodies with children’s meals. The complaint also targets makers of cereal, popsicles, and other products that attract children with toys, crayons, or stickers. (via Associated Press)

Speaking Multiple Languages Can Influence Children’s Emotional Development
Researchers are investigating how using different languages to discuss and express emotions in a multilingual family might play an important role in children’s emotional development. They propose the particular language used when discussing and expressing emotion can have significant impacts on children’s emotional understanding, experience, and regulation. (via Science Daily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, October 3rd, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Small Fixes — Micronutrient Vitamin Powders for Children
Babies cannot swallow vitamin pills, but in the developing world, there are many who need the nutritional boost that vitamins can provide.

Eating Sweets Early in Pregnancy Can Mean Obese Baby
Expectant mothers who consumed more sweets and sugar-sweetened beverages during the first trimester of their pregnancies were more likely to have obese babies than those whose intake was lower, a new study shows.

CDC: Sleepy Teens More Likely to Have Risky Behavior
Most teens don’t get enough sleep, putting then at risk for a slew of unhealthy behaviors, from physical inactivity to fighting, according to a new U.S. study.

Parents Delaying, Skipping Recommended Vaccines
Researchers worry that more parents may be refusing vaccines in the future, raising the risk that diseases like measles and whooping cough will spread in schools and communities.

‘Autistic’ Mice Help Researchers Study Disorder
Researchers have engineered a new type of mouse that models autism and could aid in the development of treatments for the disorder, a new study says.

Early To Bed, Early To Rise Keeps Kids Lean, Study Says
Kids who go to bed early and get up early are less likely to become obese than those who do not, according to an Australian study released Friday.

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Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupVitamin D Helps Kids’ Breathing, Study Says: Are Supplements Smart?
Strong bones aren’t the only benefit of vitamin D. A new study suggests that the “sunshine vitamin” helps prevent breathing problems in infants and young children.”Our data suggest that the association between vitamin D and wheezing, which can be a symptom of many respiratory diseases and not just asthma, is largely due to respiratory infections,” study leader Dr. Carlos Camargo, associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, said in a written statement. [CBS News]

Madonna Plays Santa for Malawi Children
Madonna wasn’t able to visit Malawi this Christmas, but she let the children in the six orphanages she funds there know they were very much on her mind this holiday season.  Boxes of toys, chocolate, other sweets and clothes were shipped with a handwritten note from the star, which read, “To my Malawi children on Christmas and Boxing Day. I wish I was with you. See you soon M.” Inside the goodie boxes were miniature Christmas cards signed by Madonna, Lourdes and Rocco. [CNN]

Teacher Effort Is Linked To Difficult Students’ Inherited Traits
Challenging students take up more of their teachers’ time – and the difference between a tougher student and an easier one appears to be genetic, according to a new study published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The study looked at young twins in the U.K. and asked their teachers how much of a handful they are. [Medical News Today]

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Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, November 9th, 2010

Low blood levels of Vitamin D linked to chubbier kids, faster weight gain - Kids who are deficient in vitamin D accumulated fat around the waist and gained weight more rapidly than kids who got enough vitamin D, a new University of Michigan study suggests. [Science Daily]

Fearless children show less empathy, more aggression - Preschool-aged children who demonstrate fearless behavior also reveal less empathy and more aggression towards their peers. This has been shown in a new study that was carried out at the University of Haifa’s Faculty of Education. “The results of this study show that fearless behavior in children can be identified and is related to neurological and genetic predisposition. This type of behavior has less correlation at least in infancy with standards of educational processes or parenting practice,” says Dr. Inbal Kivenson-Baron, who carried out the study. [Medical News Today]

Breastfeeding moms don’t get less or worse sleep than moms who use formula, study finds - Breastfed infants are reported to awaken more often and to sleep less. But does that mean breastfeeding mothers get less sleep, too? Not necessarily, according to the study, “Infant Feeding Methods and Maternal Sleep and Daytime Functioning,” in the December issue of Pediatrics. [Medical News Today]

New research highlights importance of parent-child communication to combat obesity - As part of its proprietary survey program, Student ViewPOINT™, ARAMARK Education, a leading provider of school food and nutrition services, surveyed almost 40,000 middle school and high school students across the country. The research revealed that parent-child communication has a significant influence on the nutrition habits of children. [The Medical News]

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Daily News Roundup

Monday, November 8th, 2010

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupMany breast-fed babies lack Vitamin D - Although breast milk may be the best source of nutrition for babies it is low in Vitamin D. Newborn babies need 400 international units of Vitamin D a day, and can not get that from breast milk alone. Mothers who have breastfed should also give their child a Vitamin D droplet.  This is a simple solution however, only five to thirteen percent of breastfed babies receive these supplements according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.  [MSNBC]
 
Cute naked photos of tots pose dilemma for parents - It seems that the days when parents could take photos of their baby taking a bath are now over.  They have the potential of getting arrested themselves for the exploitation of a minor if they post the nude shots online or in public. [MSNBC]
 
Kids get an eyeful of fast food marketing – According to researchers from Yale University’s Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity there has been a substantial increase in fast food adds bombarding child audiences, and it seems to be working. Forty percent of children ages 2 to 11 ask their parents to take them to McDonald’s at least once a week, and 15 percent of preschoolers ask to go every single day. [Washington Post]
 
Mental health visits rise as parent deploys – As multiple deployments become a norm there is a need to investigate their effects on military families as a whole.  A new study, published in the Journal of Pediatrics including more than half a million children, released information suggesting that it is harder on their psyche than anticipated. Visits for mental health concerns, like anxiety and acting out at school, were the only kind to increase during deployment; complaints for all physical problems declined, the study found. [The New York Times]
 
In efforts to end bullying, some see agenda – Angry parents and religious critics agree that schoolyard harassment should be stopped, but are charging liberals and gay rights groups as using the anti-bullying banner to pursue a hidden “homosexual agenda.” [The New York Times]

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