Posts Tagged ‘ vision problems ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, March 6th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

The Rise of Tablets as Textbooks
Well before the cleanup from Superstorm Sandy was in full swing, students could read about the weather system that slammed the East Coast in their textbooks. Welcome to the new digital bookcase, where traditional ink-and-paper textbooks have given way to iPads and book bags are getting lighter. (via Huffington Post)

CPS Sex Education: Nation’s Third Largest District Extending Lessons to Kindergarteners (VIDEO)
Is five years old too young to begin receiving sex education lessons? Last week, Chicago Public Schools’ Board of Education approved expanding expanding sexual education in their schools as a means of addressing the high rates of gonorrhea and Chlamydia cases among the city’s teens, as well as a teen HIV rate that has risen 43 percent since 2000, DNAinfo Chicago reports. (via Huffington Post)

New Video Game Detects Vision Problems in Children
Technology is changing the way we view the world, and the American education system is no exception. With as many as one in four children living with undiagnosed vision disorders that may be affecting their performance in school, it’s more important than ever for kids to get screened early. (via Fox News)

New Allergy Guidelines Advises Giving Babies Peanuts Earlier
An article in Tuesday’s Wall Street Journal highlights a new approach to combating food allergies: Introducing allergenic foods like peanut butter and eggs to babies as young as 4 to 6 months old, according to a study in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice. (via Fox News)

Parents to Congress: Police No Solution to Mental Illness
Liza Long’s son first went into the juvenile justice system at 11. He’s mentally ill, but the woman who wrote the viral Internet essay “I am Adam Lanza’s mother” told Congress the police are often the only authorities who can help deal with violent, mentally ill children. (via NBC News)

Rate of Caesarean Deliveries Varies Widely Across U.S.
The rate of Caesarean deliveries, the most common operating-room procedure performed in the United States, varies drastically among hospitals across the country, a new study has found, ranging from 7 percent of all births at the hospital with the lowest share of Caesarean deliveries to 70 percent at the hospital with the highest rate. (via New York Times)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, November 12th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Study Tentatively Links Flu in Pregnancy and Autism
Kids whose mothers had the flu while pregnant were slightly more likely to be diagnosed with “infantile autism” before age three in a new study. But the children’s overall risk for the developmental disorder was not higher than that of other kids. (via Reuters)

Next-Day Discharge After C-Section May Be Okay: Study
Some women who deliver their babies by cesarean section may be able to check out of the hospital the next day without raising their risk of problems, according to a new study. (via Reuters)

Children’s Headaches Rarely Linked to Vision Problems
If your child gets recurring headaches and you think they might need glasses, you may be mistaken – a new study says children’s headaches are rarely triggered by vision problems. (via CNN)

Early Stress May Sensitize Girls’ Brains for Later Anxiety
High levels of family stress in infancy are linked to differences in everyday brain function and anxiety in teenage girls, according to new results of a long-running population study. (via ScienceDaily)

Cell Phone Use In Schools A Possibility With ‘Bring Your Own Technology’ Initiative
As schools try to add more technology during a time when they are receiving less funding, many will begin to consider allowing students to use devices they already own. That will include cellphones and electronic tablets like iPads. (via Huffington Post)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, October 6th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

You Got Your Sperm Where?
In lifting the fog around infertility, doctors have moved nature’s most intimate act deeper into the lab, and created a population of prospective parents—straight, gay, single, and married—who crave a more human connection. That need is now being met by sites like the Free Sperm Donor Registry (FSDR), which joins a global boom in the exchange of free, fresh sperm between strangers.

iPads May Help Kids with Severe Vision Impairments
The iPad has the potential to increase communication skills in kids living with severe vision problems and become a “life-changing therapy” tool, according to research conducted at the University of Kansas.

Can Banning Hand-Raising Promote a Calmer Classroom?
Another school in the U.K. is jumping on the ‘banned’-wagon, eliminating a very basic classroom tradition: raising your hand.

Are TV Shows Making Girls Mean?
It seems one of television’s favorite tropes, that of women behaving badly, may actually affect the young girls who tune in to see all of the outrageous acts.

Online Textbooks Moving Into Washington Area Schools
Online books are seeping into schools. Starting this fall, almost all Fairfax middle and high school students are using online textbooks in social studies.

Do Thin Parents Pass On Skinny Genes?
People with thin parents are more likely to be thin themselves, a new study has found. But don’t go chalking up weight woes to bad genes just yet.

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All Clear!

Monday, April 25th, 2011

So here’s Lila with her new glasses. (I shared the story of how we learned she needs them here.) I have to thank all of you again for being so supportive and for providing so many helpful tips. I printed everything out, pored over all the great advice, and headed to the optometrist feeling confident. Lila really surprised us by being very patient while trying on nearly a dozen frames, and then cried when we had to leave without any glasses. (Can’t blame the girl for not getting the concept of ordering lenses and waiting for them to arrive.) In the end we went with plastic frames (several of you mentioned that the nose pieces on metal frames can bother some kids), transitional lenses (nearly doubling the price but at least setting Lila up to succeed in the sun), and no strap in the back (the optometrist said it tends to be more trouble than it’s worth).

Last Thursday night we picked up her new specs and she seemed to like them just fine. She only had to wear them for a little while before it was bedtime. Friday morning I pulled her bangs back with a barrette (another big change), put on her glasses, and brought her into the bathroom. I saw a flicker of disappointment cross her face when she looked in the mirror. “Don’t you look so pretty?” I asked. She shook her head and in a very quiet voice, she said, “No.” Gulp.

That brought up an interesting question: We were having lots of family over on Sunday for Easter. Should we all make a fuss over Lila’s new look, or downplay it? Before I went too far down that road of thinking, I decided not to micromanage this. Our loved ones could react however they want.

And by yesterday, she was already used to her glasses. She keeps them on for surprisingly long stretches of time, though at one point yesterday my nephew walked into the kitchen with Lila’s glasses, saying, “She chucked these and ran away.” She’s definitely discovered the power these little spectacles hold, so I need to work on dialing down my reaction when she takes them off. (I remember at least one of you suggesting simply putting them back on with a smile. I have to keep that in mind!) But all in all, so far so good.

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Didn’t See This One Coming

Tuesday, April 12th, 2011

In the middle of all the excitement of potty training, Lila had her 2 1/2 year checkup last week. It was actually kind of fun. Our pediatrician called Lila “awesome” when she told the doctor, unprompted, “I am happy.” And she called her “amazing” when Lila got not one but two shots without so much as flinching. (It was pretty amazing.)

But the doctor didn’t love how the eye exam went down. When I helped by covering one of Lila’s eyes while she identified pictures on the vision chart, she kept pushing my hand away. Then she correctly identified the bird in the top row, but then when the doctor pointed to a bird a few rows down, Lila said “Two birds.” “You see two birds?” the doctor asked, but I knew what Lila meant: She saw one bird up top, and this was the second. “But most kids wouldn’t say ‘two birds,’” the doctor explained. “They’d usually say ‘another bird.’” We tried again to put my hand in front of her right eye but Lila squirmed away. I told the doctor that I really thought Lila simply didn’t want my hand there, and she said, “I’m inclined to believe that, too, but let’s have her checked by an ophthalmologist just to be sure.” I couldn’t have been less concerned. I knew exactly why Lila reacted the way she did during the exam. In fact, when my husband made the appointment for yesterday at 5 p.m., it didn’t even cross my mind to leave work early to join them.

So it was shocking—and way more upsetting than I anticipated—when my husband called to tell me that Lila needs glasses. She’s farsighted in her left eye, and her right eye has been compensating (probably since birth, the ophthalmologist told me this morning). He praised our pediatrician for being “clever enough” to pick up on this, because without that eye exam, it’s not something that we would have figured out on our own. I’m so grateful to our doctor for catching this when Lila is so young. I also can’t help but feel a little disappointed that my instincts were off. I was so sure I was reading my daughter’s behavior correctly. Looking back, of course a doctor who performs pediatric eye exams every day would recognize a potentially problematic one when she sees it.

So on Saturday we’ll go get Lila glasses. One of the great things about my job is that within five minutes of hanging up with my husband yesterday, I had a small pile of all the vision stories we’ve done here at Parents over the past few years. I’m pretty sure I know the right material (titanium), frame shape (squarish), lens type (polycarbonate with reflective coating), and extras (spring hinges). But for all of you parents of little ones with glasses out there, I’d love to know any tips you want to share. What brand do you like? What features are a must for a toddler? How did you convince your child to keep his/her glasses on? (I have a kid who won’t even let me keep a barrette in her hair.) Is a strap better than covered earpieces? Thanks for any advice! And I’ll be back with an update once Lila’s an official glasses-wearer.

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