Posts Tagged ‘ vaccine ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, April 13th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Combined Vaccine Not Tied to Seizures in Older Kids
Although the combined vaccine against measles, mumps and chickenpox comes with a small risk of fever-related seizures in toddlers, a new study suggests that’s not true in older children.

State Media: Argentine ‘Miracle’ Baby in ‘Very Serious’ Condition
A premature baby who survived hours in a morgue refrigerator in Argentina was in “very serious” condition after doctors detected an infection, state media reported.

Arizona Governor Signs Law Banning Most Late-Term Abortions
Arizona Republican Governor Jan Brewer signed into law on Thursday a controversial bill that bans most abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy, giving Republicans a win in ongoing national efforts to impose greater restrictions on abortion.

Even Toddlers Succumb to Peer Pressure, Study Says
Toddlers are more likely to pick up a behavior if they see most other toddlers doing it, a new study shows.

School Bus Driver Who Passed Out Behind Wheel Dies
The Washington state school bus driver who passed out, prompting a 13-year-old student to get behind the wheel, has died, NBC affiliate KING5 reported Thursday, citing his family.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, February 2nd, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

3 Changes to Children’s Vaccine Recommendations Announced
The nation’s largest pediatrician group today released its new schedule of recommended childhood vaccinations. It made three major changes to its previous recommendations, after a federal advisory panel of experts reviewed recent evidence from vaccine studies. The biggest change is the new recommendation that boys should be vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV).

Can Anesthesia Raise the Risk of ADHD?
A new study finds that children who have multiple surgeries early on have a higher risk of learning disabilities later.

Home-Birth Advocate Dies in Childbirth
With home births growing more popular in the U.S., the death of a home birth advocate who went into cardiac arrest during childbirth brings renewed attention to the debate over the safety of giving birth at home.

Should Sugar Be Regulated Like Alcohol and Tobacco?
Sugar poses enough health risks that it should be considered a controlled substance just like alcohol and tobacco, contend a team of researchers from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF).

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, January 25th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Exposure to Common Chemicals May Weaken Vaccine Response
A study finds disturbing evidence that chemicals found in furniture, fast-food packaging and microwave popcorn bags may compromise children’s immune systems.

Government Requires More Fruits, Veggies for School Lunches
Today the government is releasing new nutrition standards for school meals that spell out dramatic changes, including slashing sodium, limiting calories and offering students a wider variety and larger portions of fruits and vegetables.

Top 10 States to Raise Your Child
If you want a great place to raise kids, the Garden State ranks tops. So says the Foundation for Child Development, which put out its annual Child Well Being Index (CWI), a state-by-state comparison of quality of life for kids.

Heartburn Drugs Don’t Aid Children’s Asthma
An acid reflux drug often used for hard-to-treat asthma doesn’t help children with the breathing disease and may cause side effects, a study in 300 children found.

Calif. Cuts Whooping Cough Deaths to Zero
For the first time in two decades, no one in California died from whooping cough last year, a public health victory that followed the deaths of 10 babies in 2010.

Olympics’ Baby-Seat Policy Prompts Wails of Protest
Some parents were gobsmacked this week to learn that babes-in-arms would be required to have their own tickets for Olympic events.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, December 28th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Affluent Children Are More Physically Fit Than Poor Ones
Elementary schools in affluent districts have far more physical education specialists than those in poor ones.

Controversy Grows Over Pro-Spanking Book After Abuse Deaths
Michael Pearl’s book “To Train Up a Child” is coming under fire after the caretakers in three separate deadly child abuse cases reportedly owned the book.

Mother-Toddler Bond Linked to Teen Obesity
Toddlers who have poor relationships with their moms are more likely to pack on extra pounds as they grow up, a new U.S. study shows.

Doctors Split on Vaccine Strategy to Shield Babies
A large group of U.S. doctors on Monday gave the green light for pediatricians to offer vaccines to close family members of babies who are too young to get shots themselves.

The Nurse-In: Why Breast-Feeding Moms Are Mad at Target
Nursing mothers intend to turn out en masse from Maine to Oregon to breast-feed their babies while wandering through after-Christmas markdowns or sipping a latte in the in-house Starbucks — it’s a maternal twist on civil disobedience: the nurse-in.

On Tape: Baby Puts Fingers in President’s Mouth
President Obama got a Christmas Day surprise when a baby put his hand in the president’s mouth.

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National Influenza Vaccination Week (Dec. 4-10)

Thursday, December 8th, 2011

Cold and flu season is upon us, and this week’s spotlight on influenza vaccinations is a perfect reminder to take your child to the pediatrician for a flu vaccine (if you haven’t done so already).  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the 2011-2012 flu vaccine will safeguard against three viruses: influenza A (H1N1), influenza A (H2N2), and influenza B. 

Getting the flu vaccine will protect your family and loved ones from worse symptoms.  Read more about the importance of getting a flu vaccine below.

Parents.com Resources

Here are more resources recommended by Shot of Prevention, a community blog that brings you the latest news and guidelines about immunizations, which recently hosted a conference call (sponsored by Every Child by Two and Families Fighting Flu) to raise awareness about flu vaccines.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, October 19th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Early Results: A First-Ever Malaria Vaccine Protects Children
A first-ever malaria vaccine tested in children in sub-Saharan Africa cut the risk of infection with malaria by about half, researchers announced in a teleconference on Tuesday.

Senate Saves the Potato on School Lunch Menus
The Senate moved to block an Obama administration proposal to limit the amount of potatoes and other starchy vegetables that can be served in school lunches.

No Proven IVF-Cancer Link, Doctors Say
Dr. George Sledge, co-director of breast cancer treatment at Indiana University’s Simon Cancer Center, says there are no good data to show that IVF accelerates breast cancer.

Parents Urged Again to Limit TV for Youngest
Parents of infants and toddlers should limit the time their children spend in front of televisions, computers, self-described educational games and even grown-up shows playing in the background, the American Academy of Pediatrics warned on Tuesday.

Kids, Teachers Easily Mistake Medicine for Candy
When it comes to telling the difference between candy and some medications, teachers are almost as likely to make an error as kindergartners, according to new research conducted by two enterprising elementary schoolers.

Out With Textbooks, in With Laptops for an Indiana School District
In Munster, Ind., a school system turned to laptops and interactive computer programs in a million-dollar digital makeover that included a rental laptop for every student.

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UN Foundation Announces Shot@Life Campaign to Expand Access to Vaccines

Monday, September 19th, 2011

Shot@Life

Earlier today, the United Nations Foundation announced Shot@Life, a campaign to expand access to vaccines for children in developing countries. “Every 20 seconds, a child dies from a disease that could have been prevented by a vaccine,” said Peg Willingham, Executive Director of Shot@Life.

The campaign hopes to teach Americans about the success of childhood vaccines as a cost-effective way to save lives and, in return, have them advocate for and donate vaccines to children in need.

Each year, 1.7 million children under the age of 5 die from vaccine-preventable diseases, according to the World Health Organization. But vaccines have already proven successful in drastically decreasing the number of deaths from measles and polio. Increased education about and accessibility to vaccines can save the lives of millions of more children.

For more information about Shot@Life, visit ShotatLife.org.

Read more about vaccines on Parents.com:

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August Is National Immunization Awareness Month

Monday, August 15th, 2011

vaccinations-needles-shotsAs your child heads to school, make an appointment with the pediatrician to have her receive the necessary immunizations required by your state.  Vaccines guard your child against illnesses and diseases that may be encountered outside the home.   Parents.com consulted Dr. Daniel McGee of Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital in Grand Rapids, MI to find out what parents should know about immunizations.

Why are immunizations and vaccinations necessary and still important?

The illnesses that are included in the vaccines are real, not just something that occurred in grandma’s day.  According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), there have been more 150 cases of measles in the United States this year, as well as thousands of cases of whooping cough.  Measles outbreaks are occurring more frequently than in previous years. 

What are some diseases easily preventable by vaccinations?  How effective are  vaccinations against these diseases?

Measles, chicken pox, whooping cough as well as certain types of pneumonia and meningitis are the most common vaccine preventable diseases.  Immunized children who come down with an illness will usually have a less severe sickness.

Are there any vaccinations parents or adults should get to protect their family?

The only way to prevent whooping cough in children, particularly those under six months of age, is to make sure everyone who will come in contact with them is immunized.  This is a concept known as “cocooning.”  In fact, 75 percent of the time when an infant comes down with whooping cough, it comes from a parent, sibling, or grandparent.

As kids head to school, are there any new immunization protocols?  What should parents be aware of?

Immunization schedules change each year. Although not a new shot, there is a new recommendation that adolescents receive a booster dose of the meningitis vaccine if they received their first dose before age 16.  Every person aged 6 months and up should also receive the flu vaccine. 

What are the vaccinations all schools require?  What are the vaccinations children should always get?

This varies from state to state.  The best thing to do is follow the Centers for Disease Control guidelines which are endorsed by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Family Physicians. With the exception of the HPV vaccine, almost all of the shots recommended by the AAP are required for school.

More About Immunizations and Vaccinations

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