Posts Tagged ‘ trauma ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, February 11th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Cantor: Children of Illegal Immigrants Should Get U.S. Citizenship
A top U.S. Republican lawmaker said on Sunday he would support granting citizenship to children who are in the country illegally in a sign that conservatives who oppose immigration amnesty will be playing defense as Congress takes on immigration reform in the coming months. (via Reuters)

Joe Arpaio, Steven Seagal Train Posses To Guard Schools
The self-proclaimed “America’s Toughest Sheriff” joined forces this weekend with action movie star Steven Seagal to train volunteer armed posse members to defend Phoenix-area schools against gunmen. (via Huffington Post)

Boys’ Classroom Behavior Impacts Grades, Study Finds
When your elementary school-aged son gets in trouble for acting up in class or playing too rough with another student, you might not be surprised if the teacher keeps him in from recess. But what if acting up was hurting his math grade? (via Today)

What Heals Traumatized Kids? Answers are Lacking
Shootings and other traumatic events involving children are not rare events, but there’s a startling lack of scientific evidence on the best ways to help young survivors and witnesses heal, a government-funded analysis found. (via Associated Press)

Bobby Jindal Shills For Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell’s Education Reforms; Warriors Vs. Worriors: Ed Today
As Gov. Bob McDonnell (R) continued his push for education reforms in Virginia, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal (R) stopped by for a little nudge in the right direction, reports the Associated Press. (via Huffington Post)

Striking New York City School Bus Drivers Hold Rally
Thousands of striking school bus drivers and their supporters staged a protest Sunday, calling New York’s mayor “heartless” a day before the city opens competitive bidding for new contracts. (via ABC News)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, November 28th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Kids’ Risk of Whopping Cough Rises After Final Shot
Children’s risk of contracting whooping cough increases over the years following their final scheduled vaccination, a new study says. (via NBC)

Being Bullied Can Cause Trauma Symptoms
Problems caused by bullying do not necessarily cease when the abuse stops. Recent research shows that victims may need long-term support. (via ScienceDaily)

One Child Mothers With Pre-Eclampsia at Higher Risk of Heart Problems
Women who develop pre-eclampsia during their first pregnancy (known as preterm pre-eclampsia) — and who don’t go on to have any more children — are at greater risk of dying from heart disease in later life than women who have subsequent children. (via ScienceDaily)

Researchers Study Cry Acoustics to Determine Risk for Autism
Understanding the importance of early diagnosis, researchers have been studying the cry acoustics of 6-month-old infants. (via ScienceDaily)

Legislation Proposed To Help Pregnant Women Working In NYC
The Pregnant Workers Fairness Act would require employers to provide what the bill calls “reasonable accommodations” to pregnant employees whose health care providers say they are necessary, unless they would be an undue hardship on the employer. (via CBS New York)

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How to Help Kids–And Adults–Process Traumatic Events

Friday, November 2nd, 2012

Yesterday, our blogger Rosie Pope wrote a great post about talking to her kids about Hurricane Sandy. The devastating storm inspired them to reflect on the things that are really important, like the safety of the people they love. Even though the storm can help us put things in perspective and re-evaluate our priorities, it’s a stressful time for the millions of families impacted by it. You may feel overwhelmed by the news coverage–not to mention the lingering power outages, property damages, and transportation delays. New York City’s Department of Health has created some great resources to help families reduce and cope with disaster-related stress. To make this scary time easier for kids, limit their exposure to news coverage, and be sure to talk to them about the footage that they do see. Hopefully these tips will help the people in Sandy’s wake stay a little calmer as we rebuild.

Image: Family talk via Shutterstock

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10 Things I Learned From Pediatricians

Thursday, October 25th, 2012

I was in New Orleans for the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) annual conference this past weekend, where roughly 8,000 pediatricians convened to share the latest research and policies surrounding kids’ health. If you’ve been following the news (or our blogs) this week, you’ve probably already heard about some of the big stories to come out of the meeting, including research showing that boys are experiencing puberty at earlier ages and the AAP’s conclusion that there’s no evidence showing that organic food improves health or lowers risk of disease. Beyond that, these are among the takeaways that stuck with me:

1. In a presentation by one of our advisors, Wendy Sue Swanson, M.D., a pediatrician at Seattle Children’s Hospital and author of the must-be-bookmarked blog Seattle Mama Doc, Dr. Swanson noted that that more and more parents are confusing experience for expertise. Though she didn’t single out this person, you can consider Jenny McCarthy a perfect example: Her experience with her son’s autism is clearly being confused by some as having an expertise in autism.

2. Another doctor spoke about the importance of a pediatrician getting a family history from patients. It’s not easy, since lots of families don’t necessarily know their health history. In fact, one study showed that only 1/3 of people have ever tried to gather and organize their family’s health history. Have you? It’s most helpful for docs to have info on three generations: yours, your parents’, and your grandparents’ (and, of course, your partner’s parents and grandparents).

3. Along those lines, it’s really important to let your pediatrician know if anyone in your family (or your partner’s family) has died suddenly, or if there’s a new family history of cancer. Your child’s doctor can use this information to consider recommending certain health screenings, either now or down the line.

4. Firearm safety was a big focus at this year’s meeting. Did you know that when you look at the rate of deaths in children up to age 14 in 23 high-income countries, 87% of them occur in the United States?

5. The AAP’s position has not changed: The safest home for a child is one without guns. The next-best option is a home where guns are stored safely (as in locked up), unloaded and separate from the ammunition.

6. Pediatricians are noticing a disturbing trend in the country, where they may find themselves limited by the kinds of information they can share with patients. One example is asking parents whether they have a gun in their home–and then talking to them about gun safety. You may remember the controversial Florida law that passed in 2011 restricting pediatricians from having this conversation. The law was determined to be unconstitutional and was overturned, but Florida’s governor is appealing it.

7. Sexual abuse was the subject of a crowded session. One doctor shared this stat: When a child decides to share that she has been abused, she’s more likely to tell a peer than anyone else. (Abused children tell their peers 53% of the time; an adult relative 32% of the time; a non-related adult 10% of the time, and school personnel 3% of the time. 2% of kids tell someone who falls into an “other” category.) This means, said the expert, that there’s an “underground railroad” of kids who know about other kids being abused. She made a point that we didn’t address in our recent story about sexual abuse: We have to teach our children that if a friend tells them that he’s been abused, they should try and help this friend tell an adult who can do something about it.

8. Several sessions dealt with trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)–more than I can remember from past conferences. It’s encouraging to know that 70% of those children who experience trauma have no lasting symptoms. Of the 30% who do have lasting symptoms, though, half recover, and half have a chronic form of PTSD. So it’s important to make sure a child who has suffered a trauma–whether that’s abuse, a car accident, witnessing a violent episode, among other examples–gets help.

9. For everyone with a child who has a food allergy, or diabetes, or asthma, or a similar chronic disease: Emergency medical bracelets are always a good idea, especially if your child goes to a day care center or school. Your child’s usual caregiver or teacher may be very well aware of his condition and how to manage or treat it, but new caregivers or substitute teachers can definitely benefit from the info.

10. Last week, a report came out noting that three major health organizations around the world recommend that kids under 6 get three hours a day of physical activity instead of the one hour that’s currently suggested by groups like the AAP. For those of us who have a child younger than 6, this can feel daunting. (And by younger than 6 we’re not talking about, say, newborns–this guideline is meant for kids who are awake at least 12 hours each day.) But a professor who gave an interesting talk called “The Reluctant Athlete: How To Get the Sedentary Child Off the Sofa” put it into context. The one-hour recommendation is for “moderate to vigorous” activity–and that’s just hard for a young child to pull off–so changing it to three hours gives kids more time to be active. It works out to about 15 minutes per hour, which seems doable.

 

Image: Female pediatrician checking cute baby with stethoscope via Shutterstock.

 

 

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, April 9th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Autism May Be Linked to Obesity During Pregnancy
Obesity during pregnancy may increase chances for having a child with autism, provocative new research suggests.

Apps Helping Autistic Children Communicate
Children with autism typically have difficulty communicating and interacting with others. Manuel Gallegus reports on one school in New Jersey that is using iPhone and iPad apps to change all that.

Colombian Girl, 10, Gives Birth to Daughter
Young mother, a member of the indigenous Wayuu tribe, delivered by C-section.

Emotional Trauma May Hurt Toddlers’ Later Learning
Suffering emotional trauma such as witnessing domestic violence or being abused early in life may inhibit children’s intellectual development, according to a new study.

Fertility Clinic Founder May Have Fathered Up to 600 Children
A pioneering British scientist who set up a controversial London fertility clinic with his wife in the 1940s may have fathered up to 600 children, according to research from two men who have discovered they are his biological sons.

Will High Gas Prices Bring On Another Summer of the ‘Staycation’?
Remember the “staycation“? In 2009, when recession concerns reached their peak, the term came into widespread use, referring to the practice of staying home (or close to home) as a money-saving alternative to the traditional vacation involving a flight or long road trip. Rising gas prices may bring on a staycation sequel in 2012.

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Talking to Kids About Tragedies and Disasters

Friday, March 11th, 2011

parent-child-talkThe 8.9 earthquake that hit Japan and caused a tsunami calls to mind other large-scale natural disasters from past years, such as the Indian Ocean tsunami and earthquake in 2004, Hurricane Katrina in 2005, and the Haiti earthquake in 2010. 

Oftentimes, talking about tragedies–whether worldwide or personal ones–can be difficult.  It involves explaining how and why bad things can happen to good people in the world, cultivating your child’s empathy and compassion, and making sure your child understands serious events without being too upset, scared or traumatized.

In light of this recent event, here are some guidelines to help you explain natural disasters and catastrophes to kids.

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