Posts Tagged ‘ toddler ’

Avoid Toddlers Falling from Hotel Balconies By Childproofing Your Room

Friday, April 22nd, 2011

If you’re traveling with a baby or toddler and need to stay for a few nights at a hotel, always look into childproofing the room.

A 16-month-old girl, Jah-Nea Myles, fell from the fourth floor balcony of a hotel in Orlando yesterday before being caught by Helen Beard, a 44-year-old woman visiting from England.  Jah-Nea’s mother had left her in the care of friends who didn’t notice when the toddler left the room and then managed to slip through the balcony rails. 

MyFox Orlando reported hat Beard saw the child dangling from the balcony and ran to a location underneath the child before she fell.  The toddler struck the third floor balcony before being caught by Beard.  The child still slipped through Beard’s arms and landed on the ground, but didn’t suffer any injuries.  The local hospital determined the child to be in good health and the sheriff’s captain deemed Jah-Nea’s rescue to be miraculous.

When taking a trip with your child, Parents suggests calling the hotel beforehand to ask questions and determine if it’s kid-friendly location.  Ask about  renting a crib or stroller, the hotel’s crib safety requirements, and any available child-friendly activities, pools, and playgrounds. Most hotels also offer free childproofing kits or will childproof the room for you upon request.  Just make sure to ask.  Once you’re at the hotel, look for any possible dangers such as open balconies, stairs, and railings, uncovered outlets, sharp furniture, fragile objects, loose curtain or electrical cords, and unlocked cabinets. Above all, keep your child safe no matter where you stay.

Read more about childproofing your hotel room:

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Monday Morning Boost

Monday, March 28th, 2011

Want to shake the Monday blues? Watch this three-year-old recount the plot of Star Wars:

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Daily News Roundup

Friday, March 11th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupUnder Pressure, Firm Shutters Line That Made Tainted Wipes
A Wisconsin medical supplier that made millions of recalled alcohol prep products now blamed for serious infections and at least one death is shutting down the line that produces the wipes — at least for now. But the parents of two children harmed by infections blamed on contaminated Triad products said the move is too little, too late, and raises more questions about why government regulators haven’t taken stronger action against the firm. [MSNBC]

Coffee May Reduce Stroke Risk
Women in the study who drank more than a cup of coffee a day had a 22% to 25% lower risk of stroke than those who drank less, according to findings reported Thursday in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the USA, behind heart disease and cancer. The findings add to the growing body of research showing coffee appears to have hidden health perks. A study done by Larsson in 2008 on men who drank coffee or tea had similar results. One of the most popular drinks in the world, coffee contains large amounts of antioxidants that improve health. Other research has suggested coffee can help prevent cognitive decline and can boost vision and heart health. It is also associated with a reduced risk of liver cancer. [USA Today]

Dog Kisses: Is  It Safe to Smooch with a Pet?
According to an article in WebMd, not even doctors and veterinarians agree about kissing a dog on the lips or vice versa. Thinking that dog’s tongue is clean is off base, says veterinarian William Craig, but don’t stop there. “Dog spit isn’t chemically cleansing. It turns out that it’s the dog’s rough tongue that helps to physically remove contaminants from an open wound” and likely the reason why many wounds do not get infected,” he told Pawnation. Craig adds “people tend to brush their teeth regularly and rinse with mouthwash. Dogs tend to lick themselves and eat things off the ground.” “Humans and dogs have different bacteria in their mouths,” explains Nelle Wyatt, a veterinary technician at the University of Tennessee Veterinary Medical Center. “Not all of the bacteria are capable of causing disease in the other species.” [USA Today]

Boy Toddlers Need Extra Help Dealing With Negative Emotions, Experts Urge
The way you react to your two-year-old’s temper tantrums or clinginess may lead to anxiety, withdrawal and behavior problems down the road, and the effect is more pronounced if the child is a boy who often displays such negative emotions as anger and social fearfulness, reports a new University of Illinois study. [Science Daily]

Passive Smoking Increases Risk of Stillbirth and Birth Defects, Study Suggests
Pregnant non-smokers who breathe in the second-hand smoke of other people are at an increased risk of delivering stillborn babies or babies with defects, a study led by researchers at The University of Nottingham has found. [Science Daily]

Teacher Who Twice Threw a Chair at 7th-Grader Tries to Clear Her Name
A longtime teacher at a Joliet junior high who last year “snapped” and twice threw a chair at a seventh-grade boy, striking him once in the head, is trying to clear her record so she can teach again. After Filak tried to get the boy to do his work, he instead told her to “leave me alone, fool,” witnesses said, according to a judge’s ruling that found the chair-throwing incident was child abuse. [Chicago Tribune]

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Daily News Roundup

Thursday, March 10th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupToddler Landon Schultz Eats Only 5 Foods or Goes Into Shock
Fallon Schultz, a 28-year-old clinical social worker from Howell, N.J., has known since her son Landon was two weeks old that something was wrong. He had horrible eczema and would scream day and night, projectile vomiting after feeding as if he were allergic to her own breast milk. [ABC News]

Bullying Issue Reaches White House Stage
In the wake of increased national attention to the problem of bullying President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama are hosting the first ever White House conference on the issue Thursday. [Field Notes-MSNBC]

European Cereal Boxes Linked to Cancer Not a Danger for U.S. Consumers
A few of the brands implicated in the new study, which was conducted by toxicologists in Switzerland, also sell in the United States. This raises an urgent question: Could cereal boxes give you or your children cancer? [Yahoo News]

Happiest in Hawaii: Aloha State Tops Well-Being List
Sun and waves might be good for the soul, according to a new national survey naming Hawaii as tops in well-being among U.S. states — but the sunshine doesn’t necessarily elbow out Northern Lights and snow, as Alaska also made the top 10 happiest states list. [Yahoo News]

Pretty In Pink: ‘Mom Prom’ High School Fashions Extravaganza Benefits Charity
Forget fashion week. The coolest catwalk may not be in Paris or Milan. In Canton, Mich., women were strutting their stuff from the best of Mom Prom 2011, sashaying down aisle in their prom best. [ABC News]

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Bret Baier of FoxNews on Congenital Heart Defects

Monday, February 21st, 2011

bret-baier-paulFebruary is also American Heart Month and Fox News anchor Bret Baier of Special Report with Bret Baier spoke to Parents.com recently about parenting a son with congenital heart disease.  At 3-years-old, Paul was born with five congenital heart defects and has already underwent two surgeries.    Even though congenital heart defects are a common birth defect, they are rarely detected.  Read excerpts from Baier’s interview below:

Congenital heart disease isn’t necessarily inherited — what are some methods of early detection? What are signs of a congenital heart defect? Are there ways to prevent it?

When you start talking about congenital heart defects, it’s amazing how common they are. I think one in 150 children has some sort of congenital heart defect and, out of those, half of them need surgery in the first year. Now, a lot of this can be detected by measuring the oxygen level of your blood. If there were a mandated check at hospitals when babies are born, this could be detected early.

What advice do you have for parents who need support in raising children with life-threatening conditions, defects or diseases? What suggestions do you have for promoting awareness of this issue?

Congenital heart defects are under the radar, unfortunately, especially regarding children. There is no awareness about how prevalent it is. Just the other day, the president signed the American Heart Month proclamation, and it does good things concerning heart disease, but it doesn’t deal with heart defects. The key thing is to work with your doctor, have confidence in what’s happening, and have family and friends rally around you. We got through our experience because of all the people that helped out. You realize how important family and friends can be.

Read the full interview with Bret Baier

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Children with Self-Control May Become Successful Adults

Tuesday, February 1st, 2011

disciplineIf your 3-year-old shows remarkable self-control, congratulations: Your child will most likely become a successful adult.

A New Zealand study recently published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences involved scientists following 1,000 children from birth to adulthood.  The study analyzed the children’s “health, wealth, family and criminal status when the participants reached age 32, then looked for correlations between the self-control score and these outcomes, correcting, for I.Q. and socioeconomic status” (MSNBC.com)

The study revealed that children who displayed self-control at 3-years-old made less bad judgments when they were teens, such as smoking cigarettes, taking drugs, dropping out of school, and getting pregnant.  According to ScienceDaily, self-control was defined by factors such as a child’s threshold for tolerance, persistence in sticking with and executing goals, ability to think before acting, and patience in waiting.  Children who either learned or grew up teaching themselves discipline and self-control had a better future that didn’t include credit card debts, substance abuse, or low self-esteem. 

So instead of just natural intelligence, self-control can be important in propeling children to success.

Does your child have good self-control? What parenting tips do you have to help your kids to be more disciplined?

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Perfecting the Art of Potty Training?

Monday, January 31st, 2011

potty-training-toiletsShould a child be banned from preschool for having too many potty accidents?

At a preschool in Arlington, VA, a 3-year-old named Zoe was recently suspended for failing to comply with the school’s potty training policy.  Even though Zoe had already been potty trained, the new preschool schedule changed Zoe’s potty dynamics.  Since she began having too many accidents in a short amount of time at preschool, she was reproached by the school and asked to leave for one month. Eventually, her mom found another preschool (one without a potty training policy) willing to enroll Zoe, and she has not had any accidents since starting her new preschool.

News about this suspension worries parents who are already feeling the pressure to speed up their children’s education from an early age, from enrolling toddlers in sports to getting preschoolers to read chapter books. Since some preschools now accept only students who will be less hands-on in the potty department, parents are feeling the need to potty train their kids even if they’re not ready for it. There is also a social stigma that if a child is falling behind in developing certain behavioral or language skills, the child is delaying his achievements.

However, as expert Elizabeth Page pointed out in The Washington Post, potty training is considered a motor skill that depends on a child’s own pace, much like other milestones such as walking, talking, and reading.  Adults shouldn’t force kids to potty train before they are ready or shame and embarass them if they aren’t progressing as fast as other children.  Potty training can take time and even those who are potty trained could still have accidents.  In short, children should be allowed to progress on their own terms to potty training success.

Get potty training tips on Parents.com:

As a parent, are you worried about potty training your child?  What potty training techniques and tips would you recommend?

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Poll: Should Toddlers Be Sued?

Thursday, November 11th, 2010

After an elderly woman sued two bicycle-riding toddlers for crashing into her on a New York City sidewalk, a New York State Supreme Court judge ruled that toddlers can be sued for negligence.

Even though the toddlers’ parents argued their kids were too young to be held accountable for negligence, the judge maintained their age (4-years-old) was enough to prove they were mentally developed and mature.  The judge also dismissed adult supervision as a weak reason against negligence: “A parent’s presence alone does not give a reasonable child carte blanche to engage in risky behavior such as running across a street.” (NYTimes.com)

After reading the full story at NYTimes.com, take our poll and share your opinion in the Comments section below.

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