Posts Tagged ‘ tests ’

No Child Left Inside

Friday, May 24th, 2013

Should kids get an hour of gym every day? 

With physical activity as a proven brain booster, the Institute of Medicine is recommending that schools provide opportunities for at least 60 minutes of physical activity each day for students.

Since the passage of the No Child Left Behind law in 2001, 44 percent of school administrators report slashing big chunks of time from physical education, arts, and recess in order to boost classroom time for reading and math. Mandatory PE classes can help lower our nation’s childhood obesity rates, increase brain power, and add a healthy dose of fun to our kids’ school day, experts say.

A recent study by the Delaware Department of Education and the nonprofit Nemours Health & Prevention Services analyzed the records of more than 80,000 Delaware public-school students. It found that the kids who were more physically fit generally performed better on reading and math tests than their less-active peers.

Another study done by researchers at the University of Rome found that the test scores of 8-11 year olds improved by an average of 10 percent when they exercised right before an exam.

The Institute of Medicine recommends that PE be adopted as a core subject.

Do you think PE should be a core requirement?

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Daily News Roundup

Friday, July 8th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Curbing Kids’ Screen Time is Hard: Study
Interventions designed to help kids lose weight by cutting back on the time they spend watching TV or playing video games are so far largely unsuccessful, according to a new report.

New Study Recommends “Obese-Proofing” Your Home
Whether or not your child becomes obese could greatly depend on parental behavior and the home environment, a new study reports.

Systematic Cheating is Found in Atlanta’s School System
A state investigation released Tuesday showed rampant, systematic cheating on test scores in this city’s long-troubled public schools, ending two years of increasing skepticism over remarkable improvements touted by school leaders.

Urban, Low-Income Kids More Likely to Walk or Bike to School
Children who live in low-income homes, with single parents and in cities are more likely than other children to walk or cycle to school, according to a new study.

Maryland Officials Scrap New Sunscreen Restrictions
Less than a day after dermatologists and parents said Maryland’s new policy on sunscreen at summer camps would make it far more likely that children would suffer skin damage, the state health department Saturday scrapped all of the restrictions it had imposed just three weeks ago.

As Budgets are Trimmed, Time in Class is Shortened
After several years of state and local budget cuts, thousands of school districts across the nation are gutting summer-school programs, cramming classes into four-day weeks or lopping days off the school year, even though virtually everyone involved in education agrees that American students need more instruction time.

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Pop Quiz: Is Testing Good for Kids?

Tuesday, October 19th, 2010

The next time your child asks why we need tests and quizzes, explain testing is like eating veggies—he may not love it, but it’ll be good for him!

A new research published in this month’s Science magazine explains students not only learn from testing, they also improve their memory. Simply studying without follow-up testing doesn’t help students retain necessary information.

Science magazine’s October issue focuses on a new research that tested undergraduates on their studying, memorizing, and testing abilities.   Students were given a list of Swahili words with English translations and asked to think of helpful ways to associate them.  The students were then divided into two groups—one group was left alone to study without tests while the other group was told to study and given a series of tests. 

At the end of the study, both groups were given a final test—the group that did better was the one given regular practice tests to help sharpen minds and memorization skills.  Quizzing students regularly helped them spend more time trying to understand difficult concepts.

Researchers hope this information can provide students with helpful studying tips.  So start encouraging kids to love (or at least tolerate) the benefits of studying!

Do you agree or disagree with this research?

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