Posts Tagged ‘ teachers ’

Parents Goody Giveaway: Enter for a Chance to Win a $100 Target Gift Card Courtesy of Yoobi

Tuesday, July 8th, 2014

Yoobi school supplies

By Caitlin Ultimo

One school supply company wants to make more of an impact this fall. Yoobi, a brand that will also be exclusively at Target stores, not only wants to offer up fun designs including pretzel erasers, mini and jumbo highlighters, and neon-colored ballpoint pens, but it wants your purchase to benefit students nationwide.

Research shows that teachers spend $1.6 billion annually on school supplies out of their own pocket, so Yoobi wants to help. Teaming up with a national nonprofit, the Kids In Need Foundation, Yoobi identified U.S. schools with students who have the greatest need for supplies, focusing first on younger classrooms (K-3rd grade). For every Yoobi item you purchase, the company will distribute an item to a classroom in need (think Tom Shoes, but for school supplies). Plus, everything Yoobi sells is affordable (everything is under $10).

“With Yoobi, our goal is to make school supplies phenomenal, while solving an important problem along the way: Providing fundamental access to those in need,” says co-founder Ido Leffler. “We want to provide tools that engage kids and make them eager to learn, while also instilling the values of community and giving back. I’m proud of our goal, but I know it’s just the beginning of what we can accomplish.” Yoobi aims to change the lives of more than 750,000 students by 2015.

Target is giving away one $100 gift certificate to celebrate the Yoobi launch! To enter, leave a comment below, up to one a day between today and the end of the day on Monday, July 14. More Qs about our giveaway? Here are the official rules. Be sure to check back on July 15 and scroll to the bottom of the post to see who won. We reach out to winners via Facebook message (it goes into your “other” message folder on Facebook), so if you win, look for us there as well. Goody luck!

Head over to Yoobi.com to stock up on school supplies or visit your local Target. Watch a video below to learn more about Yoobi:

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Skype in the classroom forges student connections

Thursday, May 29th, 2014

If you or your kids have friends or relatives in far away places, it’s likely that you’ve used Skype or another video-conferencing program to connect and catch up from the comfort of your computer. Maybe you’ve even done a virtual job interview or met a potential roommate this way at some point in your life–seeing someone face-to-face can really say it all.

With Skype in the classroom, students and teachers from around the world have been able to connect with one another to learn about each other’s backgrounds, discuss current events, form friendships, and more–all during a normal school day. Teachers can share lesson plans and collaborate using the Skype in the classroom website, and they can also arrange for students to chat with guest speakers representing various fields who can provide job advice and insight to the next generation.

In a fun twist, classes can also chose to “Mystery Skype” by playing a version of 20 questions in which they take turns trying to determine each other’s geographic location. When students wish to chat with peers who would be difficult to reach because of time zone differences, they can leave a video message for the far away class to watch the next day.

In an age of Snapchats and video games, it’s refreshing to see students enjoy technology that’s not only fun but educational. Teachers: do you want to become a part of Skype in the classroom? Get started here!

Is your kid changing schools next year? Here’s how to help him transition.

School Transitions
School Transitions
School Transitions

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, April 18th, 2013

Infant mortality rate in US drops again 
The infant mortality rate in the United States declined again in recent years after reaching a plateau in the early part of this century, according to a new government report. (via Fox News)

Texas School Evacuated As Precaution After February Planned Burn At Plant
A school near the Texas fertilizer plant that was leveled by an explosion says it wasn’t warned about a controlled fire at the plant in February and evacuated its students to another school as a precaution. (via Huffington Post)

Harms of Harsh Discipline Are Softened by a Loving Mother
A new study published in the journal Parenting: Science and Practice suggests that painful effects of harsh discipline can be moderated by the child’s feelings of being loved by their mother. (via Science Daily)

Warstler Elementary School In Ohio Shuts Down Mindfulness Program Due To Parent Complaints
Recent research may tout the benefits of mindfulness programs in schools — including improved test scores and decreased stress — but some parents aren’t convinced. (via Huffington Post)

Chicago Teachers Union Political Activity Hones In On Ousting Rahm And Shaking Up School Board
The Chicago Teachers Union has said Mayor Rahm Emanuel is destroying their jobs in the wake of a massive proposed closing, so now the union is gunning for his. (via Huffington Post)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, February 21st, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Teacher Survey Shows Record Low Job Satisfaction in 2012
As school districts continued to cut budgets, increase class sizes, and implement teacher performance evaluations, teachers’ job satisfaction plummeted in 2012, reaching an all-time low, according to a survey released Thursday. (via Huffington Post)

Standardized Test Boycotts, Protests Gain Momentum Around U.S.
High school students and teachers in cities around the U.S. have decided they hate standardized tests so much, they’re just not going to take them, according to news reports.
(via Huffington Post)

Lasting Legacy of Childhood Bullying: Psychiatric Problems in Adulthood
It’s not just the victims of bullying that experience long-term consequences; bullies themselves are also at risk of mental health issues later in life. (via TIME)

Adults Cut Back Fast Food, but U.S. Kids Still Eat Too Much Fat-CDC
American adults have made a little progress in recent years in cutting back on calories from fast food, but children are still consuming too much fat, U.S. health researchers say. (via Reuters)

Caffeine Linked to Low Birth Weight In Babies
One cup of fresh coffee a day significantly increases the chances of giving birth to an underweight baby, a study has found. The new findings from a large Scandinavian study suggest current guidelines on caffeine consumption during pregnancy may not go far enough. (via Fox News)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, January 17th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Teachers With Poor Ratings Clustered In NYC, Charter School Quality: Ed Today
The New York Daily News takes another look at the StudentsFirstNY teacher distribution report and finds something stunning: 20 percent of teachers are “bad” teachers in each of 14 Brooklyn schools. (via Huffington Post)

Light Exposure During Pregnancy Key to Normal Eye Development
New research in Nature concludes the eye — which depends on light to see — also needs light to develop normally during pregnancy. (via Science Daily)

Wow—Obese Kids’ Health Is Much Worse Than We Thought
The research looked at over 43,000 kids ages 10 to 17 around the country and asked about kids’ health issues like asthma, diabetes, and pain, as well as developmental and behavioral issues. (via TakePart)

Kids at Center Stage in Emotional Gun Debate
“Dear President Obama,” began a letter from 8-year-old Grant Fritz, with the shaky printing — missed words, spelling errors — of someone just learning how to put thoughts down on paper. (via Reuters)

Flu Vaccine Not Linked to Fetal Death
Getting the flu vaccine while pregnant does not increase the odds that the fetus will die in the womb, according to a new study of tens of thousands of women in Norway. (via Reuters)

Can Children ‘Grow Out’ of Autism?
New research has found that some children diagnosed with autism actually ‘grow out’ of their symptoms – as well as their diagnosis. (via Fox News)

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Exclusive Survey: Are You Happy With Your Child’s School?

Friday, September 21st, 2012

A couple of weeks into the new school year, how are you feeling about your child’s teacher and classes? Compare your thoughts to the answers 500 moms gave Parents in our exclusive partnership with the research firm Quester. While the majority of moms reported that they were satisfied with their child’s teacher, many also said that their child’s curriculum could be more creative. Study our school report card, and then tell us in the comments how your kid’s class would do. And for great ideas about how to make your child’s classes more inspiring, check out our story on 10 Innovative Elementary Schools. Working the arts into every subject, teaching math in Greek, and running a classroom business are just a few of the cool approaches these schools used to engage kids.

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School’s Out?

Friday, August 10th, 2012

While cramming your child’s backpack with freshly sharpened pencils, unopened glue sticks, and clean notebooks in preparation for the starting school year, you can’t help but be giddy thinking of all the potential knowledge and useful life skills he’s going to gain soon. Meanwhile, he’s squirming in anticipation (and maybe anxiety) at the thought of new friendships, test prep, and recess.

portrait of a dreaming schoolboy in a classroom

However, the rest of the country isn’t up to par on education enthusiasm; a recent poll found that confidence in U.S. schools is at a new low. According to the survey, only 29 percent of Americans expressed “a great deal” or “quite a lot” of confidence in our public schools. A startling 30 percent said they have very little or no confidence in public schools at all.

Why such a gloomy outlook? It could be because of new reports that find the U.S. education system has ineffectively prepared kids for economic prosperity and global competition. Or, perhaps, the fact that general dissatisfaction in U.S. institutions is a common theme as of late, according to recent Gallup polls.

To guarantee your kid is getting the most out of his school year, take a peek behind the schoolhouse doors and into the minds of the real crusaders of classroom victory: teachers and school staff. Their confidential pearls of wisdom will pave the way to academic excellence — for students and parents.

Image: Portrait of a dreaming schoolboy in a classroom via Shutterstock

 

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, July 30th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

To Earn Classroom Certification, More Teaching and Less Testing
New York and up to 25 other states are moving toward changing the way they grant licenses to teachers, de-emphasizing tests and written essays in favor of a more demanding approach that requires aspiring teachers to prove themselves through lesson plans, homework assignments, and videotaped instruction sessions. (via NY Times)

Does Impulsiveness Give Boys Math Edge?
A new study suggests boys’ impulsive approach to math problems in the classroom may help them get ahead of girls in the long-run. The research claims girls may tend to favor a slow and accurate approach — often computing the answer by counting — while boys may take a faster, but more error-prone tack, calling out the answer from memory. (via Live Science)

Burned-Out Nurses Linked to More Infections in Patients
For every extra patient added to a nurse’s workload, there was roughly one additional hospital-acquired infection logged per 1,000 patients, according to a new study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. (via NBC News)

Psychological Abuse: More Common and Equally Devastating as Other Child Maltreatment
A new study suggests psychological abuse — possibly one of the most common forms of child abuse — may be just as devastating as other forms of child abuse. Psychological maltreatment can include terrorizing, belittling, or neglecting a child, the study’s authors say. (via TIME)

Mysterious Nodding Disease Afflicts Young Ugandans
More than 300 young Ugandans have died as a result of nodding syndrome, a mysterious illness that stunts children’s growth and destroys their cognition, rendering them unable to perform small tasks. Uganda officials say some 3,000 children in the East African country suffer from the affliction. (via Associated Press)

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