Posts Tagged ‘ studies ’

Daily News Roundup

Friday, October 22nd, 2010

GoodBlog imageParents: How to raise a creative genius: Exposure to creative pursuits early in life is key to helping children get motivated to do creative things themselves, said Shelley Carson, a psychologist at Harvard University and author of “Your Creative Brain: Seven Steps to Maximize Imagination, Productivity, and Innovation in Your Life.” [CNN]

Recall of contaminated celery may expand: Texas health officials shut down the SanGar Produce & Processing Co. plant in San Antonio and ordered a recall of all of the produce that had passed through the plant since January. The plant is linked to contaminated celery that sickened at least six people this year, four of whom died. [MSNBC]

Teachers, students and Facebook, a toxic mix: The New York Post reported this week that three New York City teachers are accused of inappropriate “friending” — and worse. One teacher left comments like, “This is sexy,” under girls’ pictures, school officials told the paper.  Others made lewder comments, and some even used Facebook to initiate real-life relationships with students, it said. All three have been fired. [MSNBC]

A mother’s suicide, more than a father’s, predicts her offspring’s likelihood of attempting suicide: In the life of a child or adolescent, a parent’s sudden death is an event so psychologically devastating, it’s hard to imagine it could get any worse. But when that sudden death is self-inflicted, the psychological fallout definitely does mount, possibly compounded by the effects of genes and a parent’s behavior in the years leading up to his or her suicide. And when the suicidal parent was Mom, there’s an even greater likelihood a child will go on to make a similar attempt than when Dad was the one to kill himself. [Chicago Tribune]

Prosecutor proposes jail time for parents who miss teacher conferences: A county prosecutor in Michigan is proposing a law that could punish parents with jail time for repeatedly missing their children’s parent-teacher conferences. [CNN]

Is that right? Scarrots for trick-or-treaters?: As part of a multi-million-dollar “Eat ‘Em Like Junk Food” campaign, and just in time for Halloween, the carrot farmers — identified as “A Bunch of Carrot Farmers” and led by the big Michigan grower Bolthouse Farms — have packaged baby carrots in multi-bag packages that are purposely reminiscent of trick-or-treat candy packs. These “Scarrots” are available at stores such as Walmart. [Washington Post]

Study: Young people less empathetic [MSNBC]

Add a Comment
Back To GoodyBlog

Pop Quiz: Is Testing Good for Kids?

Tuesday, October 19th, 2010

The next time your child asks why we need tests and quizzes, explain testing is like eating veggies—he may not love it, but it’ll be good for him!

A new research published in this month’s Science magazine explains students not only learn from testing, they also improve their memory. Simply studying without follow-up testing doesn’t help students retain necessary information.

Science magazine’s October issue focuses on a new research that tested undergraduates on their studying, memorizing, and testing abilities.   Students were given a list of Swahili words with English translations and asked to think of helpful ways to associate them.  The students were then divided into two groups—one group was left alone to study without tests while the other group was told to study and given a series of tests. 

At the end of the study, both groups were given a final test—the group that did better was the one given regular practice tests to help sharpen minds and memorization skills.  Quizzing students regularly helped them spend more time trying to understand difficult concepts.

Researchers hope this information can provide students with helpful studying tips.  So start encouraging kids to love (or at least tolerate) the benefits of studying!

Do you agree or disagree with this research?

Add a Comment
Back To GoodyBlog

Daily News Roundup

Thursday, October 14th, 2010

One in five children meets criteria for a mental disorder across their lifetime, national U.S. study shows: Mental disorders in children are often difficult to identify due to the myriad of changes that occur during the normal course of maturation. For the first time, researchers at the National Institute of Mental Health have reported on the prevalence data on a broad range of mental disorders in a nationally representative sample of U.S. adolescents, which show that approximately one in five children in the U.S. meet the criteria for a mental disorder severe enough to disrupt their daily lives. [Science Daily]

AAP updates guidance to help families make positive media choices: Today, with the ubiquitous nature of media in multiple formats, the definition of media use has been expanded, and kids are now spending more than 7 hours per day on average using televisions, computers, phones and other electronic devices for entertainment. The increasing availability of media, including access to inappropriate content that is not easily supervised, creates an urgent need for parents, pediatricians and educators to understand the various ways that media use affects children and teens. [Medical News Today]

Children’s health insurance coverage varies widely according to U of M researchers: Children’s health insurance coverage still varies significantly at both the state and national levels, according to researchers at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health (SPH). In particular, researchers found gaps in coverage that vary across states by age, race/ethnicity and income. [Medical News Today]

Safe Kids USA launches new national initiative to reduce sports injuries in kids: Safe Kids USA has announced the launch of a new educational effort aimed at helping parents, coaches and athletes reduce the more than 3.5 million injuries that occur in youth sports every year in the United States.[i] The nationwide initiative is the latest focus area for Safe Kids USA and its 600 coalitions, which also works to prevent unintentional childhood injury in other areas including drowning, car accidents and poison prevention. [Medical News Today]

India home to 42% of world’s underweight children: “India is home to 42 percent of the world’s underweight children and 31 percent of its stunted children”, according to “2010 Global Hunger Index” report. [Medical News Today]

Nurses critical in assuring health needs of LGBTIQ youth: Five American teenagers, all bullied because they were gay, have committed suicide over the past few weeks. The deaths have caused a media storm and raised a critical question: Did the social or healthcare system fail these adolescents? “Absolutely,” says Concordia University Professor Deborah Dysart-Gale. “Bullying and such resulting suicides are avoidable. Healthcare workers have tools that can help queer teens – no one needs to die because of their sexual orientation.” [Medical News Today]

Add a Comment
Back To GoodyBlog

Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, October 12th, 2010

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupAlienated youths are more likely to lash out: Researchers in the Netherlands found that some children are more likely than others to lash out in response to acute peer rejection: children who already feel like outcasts. [Medical News Today]

Education program developed for preventing antisocial behavior in 3-year-old children:
University of Granada researchers have developed a pioneer intervention program aimed at 3-year-old children that helps in preventing antisocial behavior in adulthood. In its first year of implementation, the program – named Aprender a convivir – achieved that 90% of participating children interacted more actively with their peers, and that 86% reduced symptoms such as anxiety/depression, somatization, poor emotional reactivity, shyness, and social isolation. [Medical News Today]

Young people with mental health problems at risk of falling through ‘gap’ in care services: Many young people with mental health problems are at risk of falling through a huge gap in provision when they move from adolescent to adult care services, according to new research from the University of Warwick. [Science Daily]

Taking time: Children pay price for underemployment: Crazy work schedules, children in need of tutoring, and dinner in need of cooking, all plague the overworked and underemployed parent of today. In searching to find balance among their work schedules, financial obligations and family, many underemployed parents must juggle these responsibilities and find time for their children. [Anniston Star]

Mammography, vaccines still raise questions in consumers’ minds: “One from Norway found a much smaller effect of mammography than earlier studies, even among older women who usually benefit more. Authors say mammography may reduce the breast cancer death rate by only 2 percent. Another study from Denmark found mammography screening had no effect in reducing breast cancer deaths. A third study out of Sweden is the most relevant to the U.S. debate over mammography for women under 50. It concludes that regular screening reduces breast cancer deaths by as much as 29 percent – nearly twice as much as the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force calculates. So mammography studies are still all over the place” (Knox, 10/11). [Medical News Today]

Add a Comment
Back To GoodyBlog

Daily News Roundup

Monday, October 11th, 2010

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupA father’s story: Mourning the baby we never had: It started perfectly. A rocking romance, magical wedding, and a decadent honeymoon. My wife stomps out of the bathroom, half-smiling, half-accusatory, holding a plastic stick with a plus sign and yelling, “Ian, you got me pregnant!” Thirteen weeks later, we see the color flee from the face of our ob-gyn, and he tells us that this being was not meant to be. [CNN]

Too much screen time can psychologically harm kids: More than two hours a day spent watching television or playing computer games could put a child at greater risk for psychological problems, suggests a new study. [MSNBC]

Autism linked to jaundice in newborns, study finds: Full-term babies born between 1994 and 2004 who were diagnosed with jaundice were 67 percent more likely to develop autism than those without jaundice, according to the study published in the latest issue of the journal Pediatrics. [MSNBC]

Baby born from 20-year-old frozen egg: A healthy baby boy has been born from an embryo frozen for almost 20 years. The baby’s mother, who is 42 and lives in the United States, underwent treatment for infertility for 10 years before she was given the embryo last year. She gave birth in May. [Fox News]

Autistic children are not good at covering up their lies, study shows: Children with autism will tell white lies to protect other people’s feelings and they are not very good at covering up their lies, according to a Queen’s University study. [Science Daily]

Add a Comment
Back To GoodyBlog