Posts Tagged ‘ students ’

Daily News Roundup

Friday, October 22nd, 2010

GoodBlog imageParents: How to raise a creative genius: Exposure to creative pursuits early in life is key to helping children get motivated to do creative things themselves, said Shelley Carson, a psychologist at Harvard University and author of “Your Creative Brain: Seven Steps to Maximize Imagination, Productivity, and Innovation in Your Life.” [CNN]

Recall of contaminated celery may expand: Texas health officials shut down the SanGar Produce & Processing Co. plant in San Antonio and ordered a recall of all of the produce that had passed through the plant since January. The plant is linked to contaminated celery that sickened at least six people this year, four of whom died. [MSNBC]

Teachers, students and Facebook, a toxic mix: The New York Post reported this week that three New York City teachers are accused of inappropriate “friending” — and worse. One teacher left comments like, “This is sexy,” under girls’ pictures, school officials told the paper.  Others made lewder comments, and some even used Facebook to initiate real-life relationships with students, it said. All three have been fired. [MSNBC]

A mother’s suicide, more than a father’s, predicts her offspring’s likelihood of attempting suicide: In the life of a child or adolescent, a parent’s sudden death is an event so psychologically devastating, it’s hard to imagine it could get any worse. But when that sudden death is self-inflicted, the psychological fallout definitely does mount, possibly compounded by the effects of genes and a parent’s behavior in the years leading up to his or her suicide. And when the suicidal parent was Mom, there’s an even greater likelihood a child will go on to make a similar attempt than when Dad was the one to kill himself. [Chicago Tribune]

Prosecutor proposes jail time for parents who miss teacher conferences: A county prosecutor in Michigan is proposing a law that could punish parents with jail time for repeatedly missing their children’s parent-teacher conferences. [CNN]

Is that right? Scarrots for trick-or-treaters?: As part of a multi-million-dollar “Eat ‘Em Like Junk Food” campaign, and just in time for Halloween, the carrot farmers — identified as “A Bunch of Carrot Farmers” and led by the big Michigan grower Bolthouse Farms — have packaged baby carrots in multi-bag packages that are purposely reminiscent of trick-or-treat candy packs. These “Scarrots” are available at stores such as Walmart. [Washington Post]

Study: Young people less empathetic [MSNBC]

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Pop Quiz: Is Testing Good for Kids?

Tuesday, October 19th, 2010

The next time your child asks why we need tests and quizzes, explain testing is like eating veggies—he may not love it, but it’ll be good for him!

A new research published in this month’s Science magazine explains students not only learn from testing, they also improve their memory. Simply studying without follow-up testing doesn’t help students retain necessary information.

Science magazine’s October issue focuses on a new research that tested undergraduates on their studying, memorizing, and testing abilities.   Students were given a list of Swahili words with English translations and asked to think of helpful ways to associate them.  The students were then divided into two groups—one group was left alone to study without tests while the other group was told to study and given a series of tests. 

At the end of the study, both groups were given a final test—the group that did better was the one given regular practice tests to help sharpen minds and memorization skills.  Quizzing students regularly helped them spend more time trying to understand difficult concepts.

Researchers hope this information can provide students with helpful studying tips.  So start encouraging kids to love (or at least tolerate) the benefits of studying!

Do you agree or disagree with this research?

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