Posts Tagged ‘ students ’

Skype in the classroom forges student connections

Thursday, May 29th, 2014

If you or your kids have friends or relatives in far away places, it’s likely that you’ve used Skype or another video-conferencing program to connect and catch up from the comfort of your computer. Maybe you’ve even done a virtual job interview or met a potential roommate this way at some point in your life–seeing someone face-to-face can really say it all.

With Skype in the classroom, students and teachers from around the world have been able to connect with one another to learn about each other’s backgrounds, discuss current events, form friendships, and more–all during a normal school day. Teachers can share lesson plans and collaborate using the Skype in the classroom website, and they can also arrange for students to chat with guest speakers representing various fields who can provide job advice and insight to the next generation.

In a fun twist, classes can also chose to “Mystery Skype” by playing a version of 20 questions in which they take turns trying to determine each other’s geographic location. When students wish to chat with peers who would be difficult to reach because of time zone differences, they can leave a video message for the far away class to watch the next day.

In an age of Snapchats and video games, it’s refreshing to see students enjoy technology that’s not only fun but educational. Teachers: do you want to become a part of Skype in the classroom? Get started here!

Is your kid changing schools next year? Here’s how to help him transition.

School Transitions
School Transitions
School Transitions

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, December 11th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

U.S. Students Still Lag Globally in Math and Science, Tests Show
Fourth- and eighth-grade students in the United States continue to lag behind students in several East Asian countries and some European nations in math and science, although American fourth graders are closer to the top performers in reading, according to test results released on Tuesday. (via New York Times)

Obesity in Young Is Seen as Falling in Several Cities
After decades of rising childhood obesity rates, several American cities are reporting their first declines. The trend has emerged in big cities like New York and Los Angeles, as well as smaller places like Anchorage, Alaska, and Kearney, Neb. The state of Mississippi has also registered a drop, but only among white students. (via New York Times)

Vermont Tops Lists of Healthiest States
The annual America’s Health Rankings list is out, pitting U.S. states against each other in a no-holds-barred contest of health. For the fourth year in a row, Vermont takes the top spot as healthiest state. How did your state fare? (via ABC Health)

Overeating in Children may be Linked to Drug Use
Do bad nutrition habits like overeating or binge eating lead to smoking pot? Some health experts think they might, according to a study published Monday. (via CNN Health)

D Is for Divorce: Sesame Street Tackles Another Touchy Topic
In early 1992, a census report predicted that 40% of children would soon live in divorced homes. As one of the most famous children’s-television programs in the world, Sesame Street was determined to take on a topic most kids shows wouldn’t touch. (via Time)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, October 26th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Good Bacteria During Pregnancy May Ward Off Eczema
Babies were less likely to get an itchy skin rash when their mothers took probiotics during pregnancy and while breastfeeding, according to a new study. (via Reuters)

Parents Who Argue Over Money Connected to Overspending by Kids
In a new study, students who specifically responded that “my parents usually argued about finances” were twice as likely to have more than two credit cards than those who said their parents didn’t argue over money, and three times as likely to have a large amount of debt. (via Time)

Texas Schools Begin Tracking Students With Computer Chips in ID Cards
Two schools in San Antonio have begun tracking students using radio-enabled computer chips embedded in their ID cards, allowing administrators to know the precise whereabouts of their charges on campus. (via NBC News)

Why Fertile Women Are More Aloof
According to a new study, ladies who settled down with Mr. Stable over Mr. Steamy are less likely to be sexually attracted to their partner during their most fertile period than women who paired up with sexually-desirable men. (via Time)

Pregnant Mothers on Anti-Depressants Are Putting Babies At Risk, Warn Scientists
Thousands of women who take anti-depressants during pregnancy are endangering their unborn babies, researchers have warned. (via Daily Mail)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, September 4th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Asthma Drug May Stunt Growth Permanently
An inhaled drug commonly used to treat children with asthma cuts about half an inch off their height permanently, researchers reported. (via NBC)

Organic Food No More Nutritious Than Non-Organic, Study Finds
Organic produce and meat typically isn’t any better for you than conventional varieties when it comes to vitamin and nutrient content, according to a new review of the evidence. (via Reuters)

Students Who Skip School Don’t Get the Consequences, Study Says
Teens who skip school are less likely to graduate and attend college, but they don’t see it that way. (via Time)

Harvard Students in Cheating Scandal Say Collaboration Was Accepted
Harvard students suspected in a major cheating scandal said on Friday that many of the accusations are based on innocent — or at least tolerated — collaboration among students, and with help from graduate-student teachers who sometimes gave them answers to test questions. (via New York Times)

Preventing Pain from Heavy Backpacks
Dr. Jeff Goldstein, director of The Spine Service Division at New York University Medical Center, said parents would be surprised by the average weight of backpacks. (via Fox News)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, August 29th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Doing The Math Behind Homeschooling
A growing number of Americans are choosing not to send their children off to school, opting instead to educate them at home. (via CNN)

New Code Aims to Ease Suspensions of Students
New York City public-school students can no longer be suspended for one-time, low-level infractions, and the youngest pupils can be suspended only for 5 days for midlevel offenses, down from 10, according to new disciplinary rules posted by the Education Department this week. (via New York Times)

Genes May Determine How We Vote
New genetic studies find that nature may be playing as significant a role as nurture when it comes to political traits (via ABC)

Evidence Weak That Vocational Programs Help Young Adults with Autism
A new study finds there’s little science to backup the efficacy of current methods used to help young adults with these neurodevelopmental disorders segue into the workforce. (via CNN)

Normal Tot or Problem Child? Tantrums May Hold Clue
It’s common for young children to have a temper tantrum from time to time, but daily tantrums are uncommon enough to be a possible sign of worrisome behavior problems, a new study finds. (via Today)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, August 21st, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

J&J to Remove Harsh Chemicals from Baby Products
Johnson & Johnson plans to remove potentially cancer-causing and other dangerous chemicals from nearly all its adult toiletries and cosmetic products worldwide within 3 1/2 years. (via MSNBC)

Early Anesthesia Tied to Language Problems in Kids
Babies and toddlers who went under anesthesia during surgery ended up having slightly worse scores on language and reasoning tests as 10-year-olds, in a new study. (via Reuters)

Chickenpox Down 80 Percent Since 2000
Signaling the retreat of a childhood rite of passage, the incidence of chickenpox in the United States fell by 80 percent from 2000 to 2010, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported last week. (via New York Times)

As Circumcision Rates Drop, Costs Increase: Study
As gaps in insurance coverage lead to fewer male babies being circumcised in the United States, related health costs could end up increasing by millions of dollars every year, a new study suggests. (via Reuters)

Cramming May Hurt Kids’ Grades, Study Suggests
High school students who choose to sacrifice their sleep to get extra studying time in may fare worse academically the next day compared with their well-rested peers, new research suggests. (via ABC)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, August 8th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Suspensions Are Higher for Disabled Students, Federal Data Indicate
Students with disabilities are almost twice as likely to be suspended from school as nondisabled students, with the highest rates among black children with disabilities. (via NY Times)

Chalk Wars: Mom Ticketed for Child’s Chalk Drawing in Public Park
A Virginia mom has been ordered by a judge to perform community service after allowing her daughter to do chalk drawings in a public park. Last Tuesday, Susan Mortensen appeared in a Richmond, Va. court and agreed to serve 50 hours of community service by January 3, or return to court for sentencing and possibly a $2500 fine. (via MSNBC)

School’s Policy Requires Girls to Take Pregnancy Tests
Calling a charter school’s policy on pregnant students illegal, Louisiana education officials will require the Delhi Charter School to drop its classroom ban on pregnant students and the ability to mandate pregnancy tests for students suspected of being pregnant. (via Today.com)

Among Diabetes Patients, the Obese Outlive the Trim
People with Type 2 diabetes who are relatively trim may not live as long as people with the condition who carry extra weight, a new study finds. (via NBC)

Kids’ Cholesterol Down; Fewer Trans Fats Cited
A big government study shows that in the past decade, the proportion of children who have high cholesterol has fallen. (via Associated Press)

Why Aren’t Hoarders Bothered by all That Junk? Scientists Find a Clue
Scientists may have uncovered an important clue that could help explain why hoarders can live surrounded by mounds of clutter: A brain network that helps us decide whether something should be kept or thrown away may be malfunctioning. (via NBC)

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Daily News Roundup

Monday, October 25th, 2010

British kids log on and learn math- in Punjab:
Three state schools in London outsource part of their teaching to India via the Internet through new online-based company BrightSpark.  Students can now have a one on one tutoring experience at half the price that a British tutor would charge. [New York Times]

Kids’ docs urged to screen new moms for depression: The Pediatrics Academy says that over 400,000 babies are born to depressed mothers each year, and that their conditions can affect their babies as well. Research shows developmental and social delays occur often in babies with depressed moms. [MSNBC]

Raisinets recalled over peanut risk: Nestle has recalled has recalled 10 oz. “fun size” bags sold to Target, Shoprite, and Don Quixote stores because they may contain peanuts. Nestle says the recall only applies to candy with the 02015748 production code and UPC number of 2800010255. [MSNBC]

40,000 drop-side cribs recalled for safety risk: The recalled Ethan Allen, Angel Line, and Victory Land Heritage Collection 3-in-1 cribs have drop-sides that can detach due to faulty hardware or wear and tear, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission. This can create a gap where young children can be trapped or suffocated. In the past five years more than 9 million drop-side cribs have been recalled and caused at least 32 infant deaths since 2000. [CBS News]

First four months critical to new babies sleep habits: A new study in the journal Pediatrics finds that most babies will sleep five to eight hours per night by their fourth month of life. Many babies will sleep while the rest of the family is sleeping–50 percent of babies at age five months. [Paging Dr. Gupta/CNN]

Celery recall plant awaits results from FDA: The FDA linked four deaths to contaminated celery from a Texas plant. The state health department traced six of 10 known cases of listeriosis during an eight-month period to celery processed at the SanGar plant. On Wednesday the agency shut down the plant and ordered the company to recall all the produce that has passed through the plant since January. [MSNBC]

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