Posts Tagged ‘ stem ’

Don’t Miss the Premiere of PEG + CAT on PBS!

Friday, October 4th, 2013

Math just got a little more fun with PEG + CAT, the new animated series from PBS KIDS. The show premieres this Monday, October 7, and promises to make problem-solving skills a breeze for your preschooler.

In each 30-minute episode, Peg and her lovable sidekick Cat encounter dilemmas that require some big thinking. Whether they’re trying a hand at adding and subtracting or learning broader concepts like size and geometry, the pair never back down from a number challenge (or a catchy learning tune). With backdrops like a pirate island or futuristic planet, the program proves math can be exciting and happen in the most unexpected places.

PEG + CAT comes at a vital time when children’s math skills are in dire need. National assessments have shown that 60 percent of students are performing below proficient levels in math by the fourth grade, according to the 2011 National Assessment of Education Progress Report.

Another inspiring element of the show: The main character is a young girl. While women make up 48 percent of the workforce, only 23 percent are in STEM fields (science, technology, engineering and math). Let’s hope a character as spirited and outspoken as Peg will be inspiration for boys AND girls everywhere to get their brains calculating.

Beyond math, PEG + CAT shows young ones the process of trial and error, such as figuring out multiple ways to move 100 chickens back to their coop. She may not get it right the first time, but Peg eventually learns from her mistakes and seeks help from friends along the way, both awesome life skills for the real world as well.

Want to get a sneak peek this weekend? Visit the show’s interactive website pbskids.org/peg, where you can also find local listings for the show, or download the PET + CAT Big Gig app for games and learning resources now.

Check out the video below to see how PEG + CAT was created!

Add a Comment

The White House: Committed to Transforming and Elevating America’s Educational Standards

Wednesday, June 20th, 2012

White HouseSecretary of Education Arne Duncan introduced the first White House Online Summit on Education yesterday morning, to talk about the current state of America’s education and the improvements the Obama Administration is making.

The summit took place on White House grounds, and I had the opportunity to be part of a diverse group of online media outlets that focused parenting, education, financial, and current news.

Secretary Duncan kicked off his speech with some sobering statistics: The U.S. currently ranks #16 in college education rates around the world (down from #1), and our country has a 25% college drop-out rate, with more than 1 million kids leaving school with no employable skills to find a job.  And these lack of skills is increasingly a bigger crisis than our job crisis, impeding young adults from finding and keeping good jobs.

To help with the skills crisis, there is increased investment in long-term early childhood education, especially on K-12 reform for the next 15-20 years.  Launching and investing $600 million behind the Race to the Top initiative has been one solution to help a future generation learn basic skills, such as reading, before reaching kindergarten.  Also, 46 states have chosen to raise their educational standards, and more support been given to the bottom 5% of schools in the U.S., which has increased reading and math skills and decreased violence and discipline problems.

The Secretary also acknowledged that the No Child Left Behind Act is essentially “broken” and has caused states to “dumb down” academic standards during the past few years.  The the White House is now partnering with 20 states to provide waivers and “empower” them to be more innovative with educational plans.  Another goal is to train and retain talented teachers, to “elevate and strengthen” 1 million new professionals in the next 4-6 years.  All this will work toward a challenge President Obama has set: to have the U.S. be the world leader in higher education by 2020.

After Secretary Duncan’s brief, we had a few more policy briefings by other staff members from the U.S. Dept. of Education and the White House Domestic Policy Council.  Some interesting facts:

  • The starting age of the education gap is 3 years old.
  • It’ll take at least two years to overhaul No Child Left Behind and redirect focus on Race to the Top.
  • At this year’s second annual White House Science Fair, a marshmallow projector by 14-year-old Joey Hudy stole the show.

For parents concerned about the education of their school-age kids, look out for more progress to be made on the Race to the Top initiative and the Educate to Innovate campaign that focuses on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics). Watch a video with Secretary Duncan from yesterday’s summit:

Add a Comment