Posts Tagged ‘ statistics ’

Daily News Roundup

Thursday, November 4th, 2010

GoodBlog imageDoes adolescent stress lead to mood disorders in adulthood?: “What is especially alarming is that depression in young people is increasing in successive generations. People are suffering from depression earlier in life and more people are getting it. We want to know why and how. We believe that stress is a major contributor.” Researchers are particularly interested in the link between childhood stress and the development of clinical depression and bipolar disorder. His team is evaluating the stress of children who are living in families where one parent is affected by a mood disorder. [Science Daily]

Do babies learn vocabulary from baby media? Study says no: We all want our children to be smart. Why else would parents spend millions of dollars on videos and DVDS designed and marketed specifically for infants and very young children every year? But do they work? NBC’s ‘Today’ show recently suggested that claims from the manufacturers of baby media products may be overblown, and now a new study published in Psychological Science presents empirical evidence that infants who watched an unidentified baby video did not actually learn the words that the video purported to teach. [Medical News Today]

Poor women often gain too many pregnancy pounds: A new study finds that young, low-income women often gain too much weight during pregnancy, raising concerns about the potential long-term impact on their obesity risk.Nearly two-thirds of 427 pregnant women, mostly black or Hispanic, seen at two U.S. medical clinics put on more than the recommended weight during pregnancy. And a year after giving birth, about half had retained at least 10 of their pregnancy pounds. [MSNBC]

Happy Meal ban won’t stop kid obesity: The decision of San Francisco city officials Tuesday to crack down on restaurant meals that include free toys unless they meet particular nutritional guidelines is — depending on whom you ask — either taking away a parents’ right to choose what to feed their children, as some msnbc.com readers have commented, or a gift to frazzled parents up against a massive marketing machine. [MSNBC]

Therapy for women prone to miscarriage questioned: Blood-thinning treatments for pregnant women with an inherited condition that makes them susceptible to blood clots may do more harm than good, Danish researchers report. Their study was designed to investigate the cause of repeat miscarriages in women with hereditary thrombophilia, a tendency to form blood clots,  not the safety of particular treatments. Nevertheless, in the course of that work they found little difference between women with or without the known gene mutations that cause thrombophilia, except for a higher likelihood of excessive bleeding during delivery among women carrying the mutations. The researchers attribute that heavy bleeding to the “standard practice” of administering blood thinners to pregnant women with thrombophilia. [MSNBC]

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Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupSF supervisors pass ‘Happy Meal’ regulations:
City lawmakers on Tuesday approved legislation that they hope will force fast-food chains such as McDonald’s to make their children’s meals healthier or stop selling them with toys. [MSNBC]

Study: Half of teens who recover from depression relapse: Researchers have found that most depressed adolescents and teenagers who get treatment with drugs, therapy or both get some relief, but half will relapse withing five years. [MSNBC]

Fussy newborns may have more troubles later on: At just 1 month old, infants show signs of temperament troubles that can turn into mood and behavior problems later in life, a new study suggests. [MSNBC]

How to raise the men we’d want to marry: Until I had a son, I thought, well, naturally you want to raise your child — boy or girl — to have a full emotional life. Then I tried to. And I discovered that there’s a big difference between believing a boy should show his feelings freely and actually having a boy who does. [CNN]

At English-Mandarin public school, high test scores, but also strife: The school is the target of nine city investigations stemming from allegations that it compelled families to pay for after-school instruction, tampered with the city enrollment process, mismanaged its finances and manipulated surveys on parents’ satisfaction with the school. In addition, a series of anonymous, threatening letters directed at the principal and parent leaders prompted the parents association to budget $20,000 for legal assistance and stepped-up security. [New York Times]

Speaking to the identity of Chinese children in U.S.: Abby Newell’s adoptive parents have been preparing for her “birth tour” for years. They have attended Chinese culture camp in Silver Spring, decorated their Fairfax home like a Shanghai apartment and – most important, they say – enrolled Abby in Mandarin classes on the weekend. [Washington Post]

Montgomery County mom takes a poke at her peeps: Last year, out of her house in the Montgomery County town of Kensington, Sullivan launched a blog and a clothing line called Snoburbia to comment on the absurdities of the place she calls home. Though really, it could be Anyplace, USA – so long as Anyplace has elite lacrosse teams and e-mail discussion groups loaded with bragging parents. “Everywhere there are proud overachievers,” Sullivan says, “there is Snoburbia.” [Washington Post]

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Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, November 2nd, 2010

Kids’ use of electronic media at night linked to problems: More than half of children who use electronic media before bedtime may have mood or learning problems during the day, a preliminary study of 40 young people suggests. The kids in the study, average age 14, were all treated at the JFK Medical Center Sleep Laboratory in Edison, N.J. About 77% had trouble falling asleep; others had daytime sleepiness. [USA Today]

High-calorie beverages still widely available in elementary schools: “The U.S. Department of Agriculture National School Lunch Program has a broad reach, serving meals to more than 31 million students in 2008,” the authors write as background information in the article. However, “different regulations address meals and competitive foods,” such as those found in vending machines and snack bars, in today’s schools and “because children spend many hours in school, changes are needed to make the school environment healthier by limiting the availability of high-calorie beverages.” The Institute of Science and Medicine also recommends that competitive venues like vending machines and snack bars be allowed to sell only bottled water, 100 percent juice and nonfat or 1-percent milk. [Science Daily]

Anti-obesity program for low-income kids shows promise: An approach that attempted to prevent childhood obesity in African-American girls produced beneficial changes in cholesterol, diabetes risk and depressive symptoms but had little effect on youths’ weight, in a trial conducted by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. [Medical News Today]

Protecting a child’s sleep leads to better quality of life: We all know that pulling all-nighters, being overly caffeinated and overly stimulated have become a part of college life, but the reality is that even as school-age children are dealing with these scenarios. In fact, approximately 70 percent of children under the age of 10 have difficulty falling asleep or have sleep problems that diminish their quality of sleep. This means that children are a large part of the 70 million Americans who suffer from sleep deprivation. [Medical News Today]

Parents’ effort key to child’s educational performance: A new study by researchers at the University of Leicester and University of Leeds has concluded that parents’ efforts towards their child’s educational achievement is crucial – playing a more significant role than that of the school or child. [Medical News Today]

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Could Your Guy’s Diet Be Harming His Sperm?

Wednesday, October 27th, 2010

Yesterday, we told you about Edward Nejat’s research that suggests type O blood may be a possible barrier to fertility in women.

Well, another day – another study. And this time, we’ve got something for the guys.

Today, researchers are reporting from the American Society of Reproductive Medicine conference in Denver that men who consume high levels of saturated fats may produce fewer sperm. A study, helmed by experts from Harvard Medical School, monitored dietary patterns in 91 men seeking fertility treatment and found “men in the highest third of saturated fat intake had 41% fewer sperm than those in the lowest third.”

As for the reason for the link between fat intake and sperm count, additional research is required, but according to Dr. Tony Rutherford of the British Fertility Society, these findings should encourage people to eat healthily. [The Independent]

Tell us: Will this news affect your family as you try to get pregnant, or is a healthy lifestyle a no-brainer?  Let us know in the comments below!

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Is Your Toddler Loading Up on Junk Food?

Monday, October 25th, 2010

Since 2002, Nestlé — the world’s largest food company and not-so-coincidental manufacturer of Gerber products — has led studies in infant-feeding practices. The goal of this research? To find out if we’re feeding our infants, babies, and toddlers the stuff they need to grow and develop into healthy kids.

Well, the latest results are in, and although things are looking up for infants (“33% of mothers are breastfeeding nine- to 11-month-old children compared to 21% in 2002”), it appears that many of our toddlers are still eating junk food a little too often. The Atlantic listed these surprising statistics:

  • One-third of toddlers and 50% of preschoolers eat fast food at least once a week.
  • One-quarter of families eat dinner together four or fewer nights each week.
  • 25% of older infants, toddlers, and preschoolers do not eat even one serving of fruit on a given day, and 30% do not eat a single serving of vegetables.
  • French fries are still the most popular vegetable among toddlers and preschoolers.

We want to know – what do you think about these findings? Are you okay with feeding your kids junk, or do you always put the food pyramid first? Share your thoughts and advice for healthy eating in the comments!

See more coverage of kids’ nutrition at Parents.com:

toddlers are still eating junk food (keep hotlink) a little too often.  The Atlantic (hotlink) listed these surprising statistics
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Daily News Roundup

Thursday, October 14th, 2010

One in five children meets criteria for a mental disorder across their lifetime, national U.S. study shows: Mental disorders in children are often difficult to identify due to the myriad of changes that occur during the normal course of maturation. For the first time, researchers at the National Institute of Mental Health have reported on the prevalence data on a broad range of mental disorders in a nationally representative sample of U.S. adolescents, which show that approximately one in five children in the U.S. meet the criteria for a mental disorder severe enough to disrupt their daily lives. [Science Daily]

AAP updates guidance to help families make positive media choices: Today, with the ubiquitous nature of media in multiple formats, the definition of media use has been expanded, and kids are now spending more than 7 hours per day on average using televisions, computers, phones and other electronic devices for entertainment. The increasing availability of media, including access to inappropriate content that is not easily supervised, creates an urgent need for parents, pediatricians and educators to understand the various ways that media use affects children and teens. [Medical News Today]

Children’s health insurance coverage varies widely according to U of M researchers: Children’s health insurance coverage still varies significantly at both the state and national levels, according to researchers at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health (SPH). In particular, researchers found gaps in coverage that vary across states by age, race/ethnicity and income. [Medical News Today]

Safe Kids USA launches new national initiative to reduce sports injuries in kids: Safe Kids USA has announced the launch of a new educational effort aimed at helping parents, coaches and athletes reduce the more than 3.5 million injuries that occur in youth sports every year in the United States.[i] The nationwide initiative is the latest focus area for Safe Kids USA and its 600 coalitions, which also works to prevent unintentional childhood injury in other areas including drowning, car accidents and poison prevention. [Medical News Today]

India home to 42% of world’s underweight children: “India is home to 42 percent of the world’s underweight children and 31 percent of its stunted children”, according to “2010 Global Hunger Index” report. [Medical News Today]

Nurses critical in assuring health needs of LGBTIQ youth: Five American teenagers, all bullied because they were gay, have committed suicide over the past few weeks. The deaths have caused a media storm and raised a critical question: Did the social or healthcare system fail these adolescents? “Absolutely,” says Concordia University Professor Deborah Dysart-Gale. “Bullying and such resulting suicides are avoidable. Healthcare workers have tools that can help queer teens – no one needs to die because of their sexual orientation.” [Medical News Today]

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Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, October 12th, 2010

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupAlienated youths are more likely to lash out: Researchers in the Netherlands found that some children are more likely than others to lash out in response to acute peer rejection: children who already feel like outcasts. [Medical News Today]

Education program developed for preventing antisocial behavior in 3-year-old children:
University of Granada researchers have developed a pioneer intervention program aimed at 3-year-old children that helps in preventing antisocial behavior in adulthood. In its first year of implementation, the program – named Aprender a convivir – achieved that 90% of participating children interacted more actively with their peers, and that 86% reduced symptoms such as anxiety/depression, somatization, poor emotional reactivity, shyness, and social isolation. [Medical News Today]

Young people with mental health problems at risk of falling through ‘gap’ in care services: Many young people with mental health problems are at risk of falling through a huge gap in provision when they move from adolescent to adult care services, according to new research from the University of Warwick. [Science Daily]

Taking time: Children pay price for underemployment: Crazy work schedules, children in need of tutoring, and dinner in need of cooking, all plague the overworked and underemployed parent of today. In searching to find balance among their work schedules, financial obligations and family, many underemployed parents must juggle these responsibilities and find time for their children. [Anniston Star]

Mammography, vaccines still raise questions in consumers’ minds: “One from Norway found a much smaller effect of mammography than earlier studies, even among older women who usually benefit more. Authors say mammography may reduce the breast cancer death rate by only 2 percent. Another study from Denmark found mammography screening had no effect in reducing breast cancer deaths. A third study out of Sweden is the most relevant to the U.S. debate over mammography for women under 50. It concludes that regular screening reduces breast cancer deaths by as much as 29 percent – nearly twice as much as the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force calculates. So mammography studies are still all over the place” (Knox, 10/11). [Medical News Today]

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Daily News Roundup

Monday, October 11th, 2010

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupA father’s story: Mourning the baby we never had: It started perfectly. A rocking romance, magical wedding, and a decadent honeymoon. My wife stomps out of the bathroom, half-smiling, half-accusatory, holding a plastic stick with a plus sign and yelling, “Ian, you got me pregnant!” Thirteen weeks later, we see the color flee from the face of our ob-gyn, and he tells us that this being was not meant to be. [CNN]

Too much screen time can psychologically harm kids: More than two hours a day spent watching television or playing computer games could put a child at greater risk for psychological problems, suggests a new study. [MSNBC]

Autism linked to jaundice in newborns, study finds: Full-term babies born between 1994 and 2004 who were diagnosed with jaundice were 67 percent more likely to develop autism than those without jaundice, according to the study published in the latest issue of the journal Pediatrics. [MSNBC]

Baby born from 20-year-old frozen egg: A healthy baby boy has been born from an embryo frozen for almost 20 years. The baby’s mother, who is 42 and lives in the United States, underwent treatment for infertility for 10 years before she was given the embryo last year. She gave birth in May. [Fox News]

Autistic children are not good at covering up their lies, study shows: Children with autism will tell white lies to protect other people’s feelings and they are not very good at covering up their lies, according to a Queen’s University study. [Science Daily]

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